Thursday, December 18th, 2014

Articles from October, 2010

Final days of election: Dynamite!

We're in the election's final stretch, and politicians have dynamite in their hands. As our sister site PolitiFact National noted in an analysis of this election season's claims, "campaigns often begin with a kernel of truth. But then they stretch it, twist it and blow it up." In Georgia, politicians went nuclear with claims on jobs, legislation on child abuse and ethics violations. This week's wreckage could have been far worse. We ruled Mostly True on a claim by Democratic candidate for governor Roy Barnes. But our overall analysis of the gubernatorial campaign shows that if we had a Nastymeter, it would have spun like the Wheelie ride at Six Flags Over Georgia. Don't try this on an empty stomach, ladies and gentlemen. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for our latest updates.

Labor commissioner hopeful Butler accused of trying to "bully" educators

We've heard a lot of name-calling and accusations this political season. Democrat Darryl Hicks added a word to the lexicon in a recent commercial about his main rival, Republican Mark Butler, in the race for Georgia labor commissioner. Bully. "Mark Butler has tried to bully Georgia educators and now he's trying to bully Georgia voters," Hicks said. So what is Hicks talking about? Hicks has accused Butler, a former state representative, of trying to "strong-arm" University of West Georgia officials into rehiring a woman he dated.

As election approaches, Truth-o-Meter whirls

With only days to go until Election Day, candidates kept the Truth-O-Meter whirling last week. Our trusty meter ventured overseas and back again for claims on Mexican workers, Chinese wind turbines and Washington health care. Homegrown controversies over political TV ads on the rape shield law and education funding were also up for inspection.  No one fared well. All our rulings were Half True or worse. Election Day is Nov. 2. Want to comment? Try us on Facebook or Twitter.

Truth-O-Meter stuck on Half True

The Truth-O-Meter spent much of the past week stuck on Half True. Hope as we might that politicians and pundits would be beacons of truth, they struggled to get things right on everything from mammograms to the federal budget. In one case, both Democrats and Republicans fumbled on the same issue: foreign money in U.S. elections. And in one case -- taxes -- a Republican got it mostly right. Want to comment on our rulings? Try us on Facebook or Twitter. Here's how things went down: 

Truth-O-Meter spent week detecting exaggerations

This week's AJC PolitiFact Georgia was brought to you by the word "exaggeration." Politicians exaggerated their successes, stated remote possibilities as fact, overreached with their logic, and in one case, overstated the lengths of other nations' school years by a couple of weeks.  Politicians of all levels of renown diverged from the truth. This week, the Truth-O-Meter tested Nobel Peace Prize winner and former President Jimmy Carter, President Barack Obama, U.S. House Rep. Phil Gingrey and state House Rep. Jill Chambers.   Want to tell us we're wrong? Comment on our Facebook page or Twitter feed. Here's how the politicians fared last week:

Obama exaggerates his record on campaign promises

The president says he's kept 70 percent. We check his claim on our Obameter and find it's actually only 24 percent.

They flipped. They flopped. We wrote.

The Flip-O-Meter spun like a top last week. And once the Truth-O-Meter burned. We owe this to the State Road and Tollway Authority, which voted to extend the toll on Ga. 400 to 2020. And Democrat candidate for governor Roy Barnes, who mentioned he'd like to run a "civil and polite" campaign to win back his old job. And there's House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., whose office took a quote out of context. Hence the smoke. Others fared better. Citizens of the Republic, a group run by veterans of President Ronald Reagan's administration, stuck to the facts. And a Libertarian candidate for U.S. Senate got things half right. We invite you to join our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter. You keep reading, and we'll keep the old Truth-O-Meter churning. Here's how we ruled last week: