Friday, October 24th, 2014

Articles from November, 2011

Fact-checking the Republican debate in Michigan

Republican presidential candidates clashed over the economy Wednesday night on on CNBC — and we're checking the facts.

U.S. Rep. Ron Paul remix

(Editor’s note: With the Iowa caucuses only two months away, PolitiFact Georgia will dedicate this week to summaries of key fact-checks on the leading GOP candidates as well as President Barack Obama’s performance on his 500 campaign promises. Today we look at Ron Paul.) Want to comment on our findings? Visit us on Facebook. Every month since 9/11, there have been as many suicide attacks against the United States and its allies as there were in all the years leading up to 9/11. Paul made this remark Sept. 30 at a forum in Manchester, N.H., to criticize the U.S. for playing "policeman of the world." Whether Paul meant al-Qaida suicide attacks only or all groups who have executed suicide campaigns against the U.S. and its allies was unclear. Either way, the number of suicide attacks against the U.S. and its allies since 9/11 is not "equivalent" to the total before 9/11. The average number each month is actually greater than the total number that predated that day, so Paul is actually understating the magnitude. And the data support his underlying point that the number of attacks since Sept. 11, 2001, has grown. We rate Paul's claim Mostly True.

Herman Cain's golden oldies

(Editor’s note: With the Iowa caucuses only two months away, PolitiFact Georgia will dedicate this week to summaries of key fact-checks on the leading GOP candidates as well as President Barack Obama’s performance on his 500 campaign promises. Today we look at Herman Cain.) Want to comment on our findings? Visit us on Facebook. The 9-9-9 plan "does not raise taxes on those that are making the least." Herman Cain made this claim to defend his tax plan against accusations it would raise taxes on the middle class and poor during the Oct. 18 Republican presidential primary debate in Las Vegas. His plan includes a 9 percent income tax, a 9 percent sales tax and a 9 percent business tax. Based on what Cain’s campaign has said about the plan, the only exemptions on the income tax will be for charitable deductions and for undefined "empowerment" zones that would encourage development in inner cities. The 9 percent sales tax would exclude used goods. Payroll taxes on workers would go away. The Tax Policy Center, an independent policy group that includes tax analysts who have worked in both Democratic and Republican administrations, found that high percentages of lower-income tax filers would see tax increases. Cain’s campaign may release more details on his plan that could change this picture, but knowing what we know now, his claim is False.  

PolitiFact Georgia reviews Gingrich's classics

(Editor’s note: With the Iowa caucuses only two months away, PolitiFact Georgia will dedicate this week to summaries of key fact-checks on the leading GOP candidates as well as President Barack Obama’s performance on his 500 campaign promises. Today we look at Newt Gingrich.) Want to comment on our findings? Visit us on Facebook.

The Best of Texas Gov. Rick Perry

Editor’s note: With the Iowa caucuses only two months away, PolitiFact Georgia will dedicate this week to summaries of key fact-checks on the leading GOP candidates as well as President Barack Obama’s performance on his 500 campaign promises. Today we look at Texas Gov. Rick Perry. Want to comment on our findings? Visit us on Facebook.  "We cut property taxes by one-third in the state of Texas while I’ve been governor." On the campaign trail in New Hampshire Oct. 1, Perry repeated this common battle cry in his campaign for the Republican nomination. He’s referring to House Bill 1, which he signed into law in 2006. It’s intended to reduce property taxes paid to local school districts. The overhaul effectively lowered the maintenance and operation segment of the school tax, from $1.50 to $1.00 per $100 of assessed property value, or about one-third. But it didn’t translate to 33 percent lower bills for taxpayers. If you look at total property tax revenue, Texans paid about the same amount in 2010 as they did in 2005. If you adjust for inflation, he's closer (it's about 9 percent less), but it's still far short of one-third. We find his claim Mostly False.