Thursday, October 30th, 2014

Articles from December, 2013

Obamacare claims rarely get clean bill of health

If you wanted to ignite an argument in Georgia, and the rest of the nation, in 2013, you just had to say one word: Obamacare. The Affordable Care Act -- its official name -- became a lightning rod of controversy and a springboard for political pontificating. President Barack Obama’s assurance that if you like your health care plan you can keep it was named PolitiFact’s "Lie of the Year" by PolitiFact editors. PolitiFact readers also selected it as their "Lie of the Year" with 59 percent of the vote. It was a landslide. The next highest vote total went to Republican U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas for his contention that Congress is exempt from the health care law. But that only got 8 percent of the vote. Summaries of a few of our favorite Obamacare fact checks from 2013 can be found below. To comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own, go to our Facebook page  (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). You can also follow us on Twitter through our Twitter handle @politifactga. Full versions, including full coverage of the Lie of the Year, can be found at  www.politifact.com/georgia/.

Our scorecard of stadium fact-checks

The Atlanta Braves and Falcons were big news off the playing field in 2013. Both teams were victorious in their quests to win local approval to build new, high-priced sports facilities, but there was vigorous public debate and countless claims to sway metro Atlantans for or against the plans. PolitiFact Georgia tried to play referee throughout the year to determine the accuracy of some of these claims. Most of the statements had some truth in them, but there was typically some missing context. Below are some of our fact checks and findings. To comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own, go to our Facebook page  (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). You can also follow us on Twitter through our Twitter handle @politifactga. Full versions, including full coverage of the Lie of the Year, can be found at  www.politifact.com/georgia/.

Who knew? A round up of fact-checks that proved true

PolitiFact attempts to parse political truth from political fiction. We find plenty of fiction. But it’s important to remember that PolitiFact Georgia also discovers that politicians and power brokers sometimes hit the nail squarely on the head. PolitiFact Georgia published more than 240 fact checks in 2013,and 37 of those rated True on the AJC Truth-O-Meter. That compared with 26 that were rated False and 17 that earned our lowest designation, Pants On Fire. The remainder fell in the Mostly True, Half True and Mostly False categories. Today we look at our favorite fact checks of 2013 where the politicians got it right. To comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own, go to our Facebook page  (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). Full versions of the fact checks can be found at: www.politifact.com/georgia/. You can also find us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga) or @politifactga.

Oops! My statement was wrong.

Oops. My bad. I was wrong. Mea culpa. Over the course of 2013, PolitiFact Georgia has unearthed information that directly contradicts a claim we’ve attempted to fact-check. In some instances, the speaker has admitted the error of the original claim. PolitiFact Georgia decided to revisit some of our best fact checks in which someone, or an organization, corrected a statement when pressed by PolitiFact Georgia. Summaries of a few of our favorites of the year can be found below. To comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own, go to our Facebook page  (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). You can also follow us on Twitter through our Twitter handle @politifactga. Full versions, including full coverage of the Lie of the Year, can be found at:  www.politifact.com/georgia/.

A roundup of false comments that still burn

There’s not much worse  for the political class than a trip to the fiery regions courtesy of PolitiFact Georgia and the AJC Truth-O-Meter. This year PolitiFact Georgia published more than 240 fact checks. Of those, 17 had the distinction of being awarded a Pants On Fire rating. Not only were these statements judged to be untrue, but they were found to be ridiculously so. Here are summaries of a few of our favorite incendiary ratings of the year. Today’s roundup kicks off a weeklong review of some of the best of PolitiFact Georgia from 2013. To comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own, go to our Facebook page  (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). Full versions of the fact checks can be found at www.politifact.com/georgia/. You can also find us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga).

PolitiFact names its 2013 Lie of the Year

PolitiFact National has chosen the most significant falsehood of the year: President Barack Obama's repeated statement, "If you like your health care plan, you can keep it."