Thursday, July 30th, 2015

Jim Denery

Word editor

Jim Denery is Word editor at The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Email: jdenery@ajc.com

The latest Truth-O-Meter items from Jim Denery

True

"Look again" has to be motto for children's sake

False

A day is not a day in the General Assembly

True

House took charge of boundaries after advocates failed to reach deal

Pants on Fire!

Ingredient also not part of childhood vaccines

Mostly False

Images don't tell whole story

Recent stories from Jim Denery

Walker wants to build on early positives

Editor’s note: This is part of an occasional series from PolitiFact Georgia on the 2016 presidential candidates that appears on Mondays. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker entered the crowded Republican race for president July 13 with an edge over some of his competitors: a national conservative following built around his efforts against public employee unions. In his announcement speech, Walker, 47, said he will run for president as a Washington outsider who will cut taxes and reduce the size of the federal government.   Walker was first elected to a four-year term as governor of Wisconsin in 2010. But he was forced to face state voters again in 2012 after Democrats and organized labor collected enough signatures to force a recall election. They were upset by Walker's controversial plan to strip most public workers of union rights. Walker survived the recall election and was re-elected in 2014. "My record shows that I know how to fight," he said in a 45-minute speech announcing his candidacy for president. "And I know now, more than ever, that Americans need a president who can fight and win for America." PolitiFact has checked numerous statements by Walker in his tenure as governor and in the months that he has traveled the country in anticipation of entering the presidential race. As of last week, PolitiFact has fact-checked 145 statements by Walker, rating 16, or 11 percent, True; 32, or 22 percent, Mostly True; 27, or 19 percent, Half True; 22, or 15 percent, Mostly False; 38, or 26 percent, False; and 10, or 7 percent, Pants on Fire.

PolitiFact at 5: True-rated fact-checks

What better way to close out our celebration of PolitiFact Georgia’s five-year anniversary than to look at claims that we researched and found were true. Just as the claims we’ve rated False or Pants On Fire point out when politicians got it wrong or played it fast and loose with the facts, the True-rated fact checks highlight when they did their homework and were right. That was the aim five years and more than 1,000 fact checks ago when The Atlanta Journal-Constitution launched PolitiFact Georgia, a unique journalistic attempt to parse political truth from political fiction. Summaries of a few of our True fact checks through the years are below. To comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own, go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). You can also follow us on Twitter through our Twitter handle @politifactga.  

PolitiFact Georgia at 5 shares some favorite claims

PolitiFact Georgia continues celebrating its fifth anniversary today by showcasing some head-turning claims we’ve fact-checked over the years from politicians, newsmakers and social media. Some of the hard-to-believe claims proved to be true, and those easy to accept were sometimes shown to be rather outlandish. But all of them provided interesting fodder for our fact-checkers. Summaries of a few of our favorites are below. To comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own, go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). You can also follow us on Twitter through our Twitter handle @politifactga.    

Revving up on claims about Mercedes' move

PolitiFact Georgia has taken the wheel before on claims about Mercedes-Benz USA's move to metro Atlanta. With the luxury automaker again in the headlines following the 2015 Legislative session, we revisit some of our fact checks on claims about the relocation and what it means for Georgia.  

About those claims from the General Assembly

The hallways under the Gold Dome are quiet now. But the 2015 Legislature session kept reporters and fact checkers alike busy during a 40-day session filled with truths, falsehoods and some claims that fell in between.  

Our favorites that popped up in your newsfeed in 2014

It's not always a statement by a politician that spins the Truth-O-Meter into action. There are plenty of claims going viral via social media that drew the attention and scrutiny of PolitiFact Georgia in 2014. Below are some of our favorite memes of the year.  

How the claims stacked up in 2014

The scribes at PolitiFact Georgia are finishing up another year of fact checks. Here's a look at the year, by the numbers.

Truth be told, some newsmakers got it right

The fact-checking scribes at PolitiFact Georgia are often viewed as heartless Grinches, callously outing falsehoods by politicians and other powerbrokers. Truth be told -- and that’s our mission -- the folks we fact-check often turn out to be correct. So in the spirit of the season, as 2014 winds down, we look back at some of our favorite True ratings for the year. Want to to comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own? Just go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). You can also follow us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga). Abbreviated versions of our fact checks are below. Full versions can be found at www.politifact.com/georgia/.  

A sampling of Mostly True statements in 2014

There are times when a little additional context or clarification can add to the accuracy of a statement. PolitiFact calls those claims Mostly True. Below is a sampling of some of 2014's top Mostly True statements from Georgia politicians.

A post-mortem on Georgia's midterm elections

Tuesday's midterm elections will have repercussions for months and years to come. PolitiFact Georgia takes a moment to look back at key issues in the two big races, for governor and U.S. Senate.