Monday, September 22nd, 2014

All stories featuring Kasim Reed

Our scorecard of stadium fact-checks

The Atlanta Braves and Falcons were big news off the playing field in 2013. Both teams were victorious in their quests to win local approval to build new, high-priced sports facilities, but there was vigorous public debate and countless claims to sway metro Atlantans for or against the plans. PolitiFact Georgia tried to play referee throughout the year to determine the accuracy of some of these claims. Most of the statements had some truth in them, but there was typically some missing context. Below are some of our fact checks and findings. To comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own, go to our Facebook page  (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). You can also follow us on Twitter through our Twitter handle @politifactga. Full versions, including full coverage of the Lie of the Year, can be found at  www.politifact.com/georgia/.

Who knew? A round up of fact-checks that proved true

PolitiFact attempts to parse political truth from political fiction. We find plenty of fiction. But it’s important to remember that PolitiFact Georgia also discovers that politicians and power brokers sometimes hit the nail squarely on the head. PolitiFact Georgia published more than 240 fact checks in 2013,and 37 of those rated True on the AJC Truth-O-Meter. That compared with 26 that were rated False and 17 that earned our lowest designation, Pants On Fire. The remainder fell in the Mostly True, Half True and Mostly False categories. Today we look at our favorite fact checks of 2013 where the politicians got it right. To comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own, go to our Facebook page  (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). Full versions of the fact checks can be found at: www.politifact.com/georgia/. You can also find us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga) or @politifactga.

A $1 billion deal

Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed and Atlanta Falcons owner Arthur Blank announced recently they’ve agreed to the financial framework of a $1 billion stadium to replace the 20-year-old Georgia Dome. The deal must still be approved by the 15-member Atlanta City Council.  

The Transportation Tax – Truth, Lies and Gridlock

As the referendum on a tax to fund transportation projects for metro Atlanta nears, our fact check tally rises.  Your PolitiFact Georgia scribes have completed nearly two dozen fact checks on Tuesday's referendum, which has made bedfellows out of earstwhile enemies.  The Sierra Club has joined forces with members of Georgia's Tea Party to oppose the measure, while Chamber of Commerce-types have allied with sustainability advocates to rally for it. Want to comment on our findings? It's easy. Just go to our Facebook page and hit the "like" button. And you are free to express yourself, pro or con. Those for and against the one-percent tax increase say that the facts and figures are on their side. Sometimes they are. Other times they aren’t. We'll tell you who's right in this roundup of our rulings. And check back soon. We'll post more as we write new stories. Here’s how both sides have fared so far:

Transportation Tax: The Best of the Truths, Rumors and Gridlock

The road to Tuesday’s monumental transportation tax vote is paved with truths, rumors and innuendoes. Leave it to the Truth-O-Meter to inspect every bump and crack in the pavement. Since spring, PolitiFact published nearly two dozen stories checking statements about the 10-year, 1 percent sales tax, otherwise known as T-SPLOST. It could raise $8.5 billion over 10 years, after inflation. Want to comment on our transportation tax rulings? Just go to our Facebook page or find us on Twitter. Both sides got it wrong some of the time. Statements by supporters and opponents often fell short of True. And once Election Day is over, we expect the rhetoric to continue. Metro Atlantans love to gripe about traffic. Bring it on. We could go for miles and miles. Read these summaries of our transportation tax rulings below.

Truth-O-Meter rattles saber, burns britches

Last week, AJC PolitiFact Georgia's Truth-O-Meter emerged from its holiday slumber and rattled its saber.   First, it made quick work of claims on subjects including corporate tax rates, Atlanta's budget and whether DeKalb is the "greenest" county in America. Then, in honor of the Civil War's sesquicentennial, it burned some britches for a group's claim that blacks fought in droves for the Confederacy. The Truth-O-Meter takes no prisoners. Join us on Twitter and Facebook to comment and read our latest updates.

2010: The Year in Misrepresentations

The new year approaches, and your AJC PolitiFact Georgia team is growing misty-eyed.  Although we launched only six months ago, we already have cherished memories of pants we've burned, or slightly singed. As the AJC Truth-O-Meter winds down for the year, we thought we would share a few of those moments when we smelled flames. Here, in chronological order, are the summaries of some of our favorite untruths and misrepresentations of 2010: