Jacobson

Louis Jacobson is the senior correspondent for PolitiFact and a staff writer for the Tampa Bay Times. He has served as deputy editor of Roll Call and as founding editor of its legislative wire service, CongressNow. Earlier, he spent more than a decade covering politics, policy and lobbying for National Journal magazine. Since 2002, he has handicapped political races, including state legislatures, governors, congressional seats, state attorneys general and the electoral college, currently for Governing. He is senior author of The Almanac of American Politics 2016 and The Almanac of American Politics 2018 and also contributed to the 2000 and 2004 editions. In 2004, Jacobson originated the “Out There” column on politics in the states, which ran in Roll Call and later in Stateline.org and which won five annual awards from Capitolbeat, the association of state capitol reporters and editors. He received the Weidenbaum Center Award for Evidence-Based Journalism from Washington University in St. Louis in 2014, and in 2017, the Society of American Business Editors and Writers gave him a Best in Business award for his economics coverage.

The latest Truth-O-Meter items from Louis Jacobson

Pants on Fire!

From an entertainment and humor site

Recent stories from Louis Jacobson

Fact-checking 9 things Trump overstated, got wrong in his Cedar Rapids speech

His June 21, 2017, rally speech in Cedar Rapids ranged from health care to jobs to immigration to the Paris climate agreement.

Senate health care bill's two-front war: Policy and process

Now that a Senate health care bill has been unveiled, senators will be jousting over its provisions to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, President Barack Obama’s signature health care law.

Five things to watch in the Senate health care bill

Senate Republicans are soon scheduled to unveil the bill they will use to seek to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. The bill -- drafted in secret, away from even most Senate Republicans -- has prompted intense speculation about what might be included.

7 questions about the Senate health care bill and transparency

As Senate Republicans move closer to repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act, Democrats have ramped up their attacks against the secrecy Republicans have used to write the bill -- and have particularly targeted the hypocrisy of Republican lawmakers who criticized Democrats in previous years for crafting legislation in secret.

Fact-checking Donald Trump's statement withdrawing from the Paris climate agreement

President Donald Trump announced that the United States will withdraw from the Paris accord on climate change. All but two countries signed the agreement. But Trump said the deal puts the United States at a disadvantage.

Does the U.S. have a 'massive' trade deficit with Germany, as Donald Trump said?

Following tension-filled interactions at the NATO and G-7 summits, President Donald Trump and German Chancellor Angela Merkel have been engaging in something of a war of words.

Why economists are skeptical that U.S. can grow by 3 percent

When President Donald Trump’s budget director, Mick Mulvaney, released the administration’s budget proposal on May 23, he emphasized that the administration believes that three percent annual growth is a reachable goal. But economists are skeptical.

Obstruction of justice, presidential immunity, impeachment: What you need to know

We wanted to examine three key questions surrounding Trump’s legal situation. First, does the information revealed so far offer a plausible case that Trump committed obstruction of justice? Second, can a sitting president even be criminally prosecuted? And third, what does all this mean for possible impeachment proceedings?

Reports say Trump shared highly classified intel with Russian diplomats: What we know so far

Several major news outlets reported Monday that President Donald Trump shared highly classified information with Russian diplomats in a meeting last week. Here’s what we know about the situation so far, as well as some background to put the current situation in context.

Can presidents secretly record White House conversations? Yes

On the morning of May 12, 2017, President Donald Trump tweeted, "James Comey better hope that there are no "tapes" of our conversations before he starts leaking to the press!" Already primed to look at the parallels between Trump’s presidency and Richard Nixon’s, observers jumped on the suggestion that Trump could be following Nixon’s lead in secretly taping conversations in the White House. We wondered: Would it be within Trump’s legal rights to conduct secret taping in the White House?