Statements about Debt

The cost of "college education has gone up 1,200 percent since 1978."

The Senate proposal to restore emergency unemployment benefits for five months was "fully paid for."

I turned "a $110 million deficit into a $1.6 million surplus for our city."

"In Rhode Island today, 25 percent of our households either don't have a bank account at all, or they have a bank account and they're still relying on high-cost financial services like payday loans, pawn shop check cashing and so on."

"We see a quarter-billion dollars in a pension fund that needs to be funded at $1.2 billion."

The town of Cumberland has "its highest bond rating in history."

"The Congressional Budget Office, a nonpartisan office, did an analysis and said that passing comprehensive immigration reform will reduce the federal deficit by $200 billion over the next decade."

Economic Development Commission Executive Director Keith Stokes "sent me a letter and he said the taxpayers will never be on the hook for these bonds" for 38 Studios.

"The average student comes out of college hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt."

Historically, the Social Security tax has been assessed on about 90% of U.S. income. Now it captures 83% because there's been such a growth of income among the highest earners.

Of six Rhode Island tax-credit programs worth about $35 million, "three companies got 90 percent of that -- CVS and two companies not even located in the state of Rhode Island."

"There are more oil rigs in operation in the United States than the rest of the world combined."

U.S. Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse "rewarded Wall Street executives with millions in bonuses."

David Cicilline was "required to provide key information about city finances to an independent outside auditor. The deadlines were clear -- yet [he intentionally] missed them by months" until after the November 2010 election.

"The auditor [for the city of Providence] was not locked out" of access to the city's finances.

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