Statements about Civil Rights

"The governor does not have any power to veto a referendum [on same-sex marriage] that would be a constitutional amendment."

On same-sex marriage

Three thousand felons voted in Rhode Island in 2008.

Says 40 years ago, the U.S. placed Texas under Voting Rights Act for failing to print ballots in Spanish.

Says recent studies indicate that nationally, only 8 percent of white voting-age citizens but 25 percent of African-American voting-age citizens lack government-issued photo IDs.

Says, "Less than half of all states have legal protections on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity, despite the fact that LGBT Americans report employment discrimination and unemployment at much higher rates than the U.S. average."

"When these [undocumented] students graduate from college, they're still illegal aliens. They cannot get a job."

On support for gay marriage.

Says Mitt Romney "has refused to say whether he would have vetoed or signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act."

The Wisconsin law repealed by Republicans, which allowed discriminated workers to sue in state court, "was kind of a gravy train" for lawyers.

Says Wisconsin women facing pay discrimination can't "do something about it" under bill passed by Republicans.

Says Wisconsin Assembly Republicans voted to repeal a law that ensures "that women cannot get paid less than a man for doing the same job."

"Martin Luther King was a Republican."

"[The] ACLU and atheists in Denver are demanding the NFL stop [Tim Tebow] from praying on the sidelines."

"In 1958, there were 16 states in this country that prohibited -- prohibited -- an African-American and a Caucasian from being married."

When Georgia tightened its voter identification laws, the state sent a van and photographer to the homes of people who needed photo IDs and made them for free. 

"After filing a lawsuit in Rhode Island, we reached an agreement with state agencies that resulted in more voters being registered in the first full month after our lawsuit than in the entire previous two-year reporting period."

Says the Department of Defense changed its definitions of al-Qaeda and the Taliban making it so almost anybody can be loosely associated with the groups.

Says that Sen. Sherrod Brown is "out there egging on a lot of these protesters who are spitting on policemen and going to the bathroom on policemen’s cars at these protests on Wall Street and other places." 

Under a Wisconsin bill, "minor offenses such as violating pet leash laws, seat belt laws, parking infractions, etc., would now be arrestable offenses."

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