Statements about State Finances

Gov. Scott Walker bought "80 new, brand-new vehicles" for the state that "we probably don’t need."

Greg Abbott defended more than $5 billion in public school funding cuts in fighting hundreds of school districts in court.

Even after collective bargaining reforms, most Wisconsin public employees "are still paying about 12 to 13 percent" of their health insurance premiums, while most state residents who work in the private sector "pay 20 to 25 percent."  

"Only 25 percent of what people buy is subject to Rhode Island’s sales tax."

"The state budget has actually grown by $4.6 billion under" Gov. Scott Walker’s actions.

"You've seen where we're now going from a $700 million surplus to getting into the next biennium with almost a $750 million deficit."

Rhode Island's unemployment insurance system "is the most expensive such system in the country."

"The $3.6 billion deficit we inherited has turned into more than a half-billion-dollar surplus."

Says Alex Sink supported "a $5.2 billion increase in Florida's debt."

"The Legislature passed Gov. Walker’s so-called property tax relief bill," but the Republicans "are still raising your property taxes."  

"Providence has more of its pension fund invested in hedge funds and is less transparent" about it than the state.

$6 billion water bond program voters passed in 2011 "has yet to be tapped."

Says Barbara Buono "voted to raise her own pay 40 percent."

Wendy Davis is "threatening to raise taxes up to $35 billion."

Any state tax law has to start in the House and the renewal of the state hospital bed tax this year started in the Senate, which is unconstitutional.

"Thanks to (Rick) Perry's bad budgeting, the (Texas) highway department has to convert some modern paved state roads back to gravel."

Tuition at Rutgers has increased 10 percent since Gov. Chris Christie took office because he "cut funding for higher education."

"We’ve used (generally accepted accounting principles) here in this building the last two years."

Says he would be first CPA to serve as Texas comptroller.

"Trenton politicians cut $1.3 billion from education."

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