Ben Carson's first 10 fact-checks

Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson speaks during the Values Voter Summit, held by the Family Research Council Action, Sept. 25, 2015, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson speaks during the Values Voter Summit, held by the Family Research Council Action, Sept. 25, 2015, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

With Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson rising in the polls, we wanted to take a look at how he’s performed on the Truth-O-Meter so far.

Most of the latest polls among Republican presidential hopefuls have the former pediatric neurosurgeon in second place, catching up to frontrunner Donald Trump.

We’ve fact-checked Carson, a newcomer to the political scene, 10 times so far: one Pants on Fire, four Falses, three Mostly Falses, zero Mostly Trues and zero Trues. Browse his entire record here.

We first fact-checked Carson back in March 2015. He said, "A lot of people who go into prison straight, and when they come out they’re gay." There is no evidence to back up this point, so we rated the claim False.

More recently, Carson added fuel to the anti-vaccination movement in remarks at a Sept. 16 presidential debate. He said pediatricians have cut down on the number and proximity of vaccines because they recognize there have been "too many in too short a period of time." We found that if doctors do delay vaccine schedules, it’s typically in response to parents’ requests. We rated this claim Pants on Fire.

He also said there are a "multitude" of vaccines that do not prevent deadly and crippling diseases. PolitiFact Georgia found that the diseases targeted by the vaccines recommended for children on a set schedule are nearly universally lethal. We rated the claim False.