Trump-O-Meter

Replace J-1 Visa with Inner City Resume Bank

"The J-1 visa jobs program for foreign youth will be terminated and replaced with a resume bank for inner city youth provided to all corporate subscribers to the J-1 visa program."


Updates

President Donald Trump stalls on promise to eliminate J-1 visa program

President Donald Trump, in an outline of his immigration plan during the presidential campaign, said he would get rid of a visa program that brings in foreign youth and replace it with a résumé bank for American inner-city youth.

So far, the J-1 visa jobs program remains in effect. The White House did not respond to our queries on whether a résumé bank had been set up to replace the visa program, or if American businesses had access to such résumé bank.

The J-1 visa program, or exchange visitor program, allows young people from other countries to come to the United States for educational and cultural exchanges. There are 15 different categories under the program and 13 include private programs, according to the State Department.

Young people who come to the United States are able to improve their English language abilities, sharpen skills and learn more about the United States and its people. They can study, engage in research, teach and receive on-the-job training for weeks or several years, the State Department said.

About 300,000 people come to the United States per year under the J-1 visa program, and 86 percent of them are 30 years old or younger.

The State Department said there has been no change in procedures for handling applications for J-1 visas. J-1 visas continue to be issued under approved guidelines and at the same levels from past few years, the State Department said.

We'll continue to monitor this proposal. But without any steps so far, we rate this promise Stalled.

Sources:

Internet Archive, Donald J. Trump campaign website, immigration plan, snapshot from May 11, 2016

Email interview, State Department press office, Oct. 6, 2017

State Department, J-1 visa program common questions, facts and figures, accessed Oct. 6, 2017