Jacobson

Louis Jacobson is the senior correspondent for PolitiFact and a staff writer for the Tampa Bay Times. He has served as deputy editor of Roll Call and as founding editor of its legislative wire service, CongressNow. Earlier, he spent more than a decade covering politics, policy and lobbying for National Journal magazine. Since 2002, he has handicapped political races, including state legislatures, governors, congressional seats, state attorneys general and the electoral college, currently for Governing. He is senior author of The Almanac of American Politics 2016 and The Almanac of American Politics 2018 and also contributed to the 2000 and 2004 editions. In 2004, Jacobson originated the “Out There” column on politics in the states, which ran in Roll Call and later in Stateline.org and which won five annual awards from Capitolbeat, the association of state capitol reporters and editors. He received the Weidenbaum Center Award for Evidence-Based Journalism from Washington University in St. Louis in 2014, and in 2017, the Society of American Business Editors and Writers gave him a Best in Business award for his economics coverage.

The latest Truth-O-Meter items from Louis Jacobson

Recent stories from Louis Jacobson

Why economists are skeptical that U.S. can grow by 3 percent

When President Donald Trump’s budget director, Mick Mulvaney, released the administration’s budget proposal on May 23, he emphasized that the administration believes that three percent annual growth is a reachable goal. But economists are skeptical.

Obstruction of justice, presidential immunity, impeachment: What you need to know

We wanted to examine three key questions surrounding Trump’s legal situation. First, does the information revealed so far offer a plausible case that Trump committed obstruction of justice? Second, can a sitting president even be criminally prosecuted? And third, what does all this mean for possible impeachment proceedings?

Reports say Trump shared highly classified intel with Russian diplomats: What we know so far

Several major news outlets reported Monday that President Donald Trump shared highly classified information with Russian diplomats in a meeting last week. Here’s what we know about the situation so far, as well as some background to put the current situation in context.

Can presidents secretly record White House conversations? Yes

On the morning of May 12, 2017, President Donald Trump tweeted, "James Comey better hope that there are no "tapes" of our conversations before he starts leaking to the press!" Already primed to look at the parallels between Trump’s presidency and Richard Nixon’s, observers jumped on the suggestion that Trump could be following Nixon’s lead in secretly taping conversations in the White House. We wondered: Would it be within Trump’s legal rights to conduct secret taping in the White House?

How similar are the Saturday Night Massacre and the Comey firing?

For many political observers, President Donald Trump’s sudden firing of FBI Director James Comey immediately called to mind President Richard Nixon’s Saturday Night Massacre. That night back in 1973, Nixon fired Watergate special prosecutor Archibald Cox, even as his top two Justice Department officials resigned in protest rather than carry out Nixon’s order.

What’s in the House health care bill?

We looked at the particulars in The American Health Care Act passed by the House May 4.

What's up with Donald Trump and Andrew Jackson?

If it were possible to have a bromance across the centuries, Presidents Andrew Jackson and Donald Trump would almost certainly qualify.

Fact-checking Donald Trump's 100-days campaign ad

In a sign that it’s never too early to start planning for one’s reelection, President Donald Trump’s campaign released an ad on May 1 -- approximately 1,360 days before the 2020 election --  to tout the accomplishments of his first 100 days in office.

Fact-checking Marco Rubio’s statements about the Iran nuclear deal

The Republican U.S. senator from Florida said that the 2015 agreement will not prevent a nuclear Iran.

Sorting through Trump's shift on releasing White House visitor logs

The Trump administration met widespread opposition from advocates of government transparency when it announced that it would not be publicizing the logs of White House visitors -- as the Obama White House generally had done.