The Truth-O-Meter Says:
Simac

Says people who signed recall petitions against Wisconsin state Sen. Jim Holperin received "harassing phone calls from out-of-state telemarketers claiming to represent the Democratic Party and insinuating foul play by petition circulators."

Kim Simac on Friday, April 29th, 2011 in a news release

Wisconsin tea party leader says Democrat-hired telemarketer called recall petition signers

Kim Simac, a Wisconsin tea party leader, took aim at state Sen. Jim Holperin after the Conover Democrat fled to Illinois in February 2011.

Like 13 other Democratic senators, Holperin, who represents a North Woods district where Simac lives, spent three weeks in Illinois. The move delayed a vote on Republican Gov. Scott Walker’s budget-repair bill, which curtails the collective bargaining power of most state and local government employees, although the bill eventually became law.

Court challenges have kept the collective bargaining changes from taking effect. But the law, and the Democrats’ reaction to it, spurred a recall movement of historic proportions. Campaigns were launched against all 16 state senators -- eight Democrats and eight Republicans  -- who were eligible to be recalled.

Simac, vice-chairwoman of the Vilas County Republican Party and founder of Christian values group called Northwoods Patriots, headed the signature-collecting campaign to recall Holperin, a first-term senator who previously served 10 years in the state Assembly.

On April 21, 2011, Simac submitted some 23,000 signatures to the Government Accountability Board, which has not completed its review. She has announced plans to run against Holperin if a recall election is set.

Eight days after the petitions were filed, Simac issued a news release that claimed petition signers, "are being subjected to harassing phone calls from out-of-state telemarketers claiming to represent the Democratic Party and insinuating foul play by petition circulators."

Let’s see if that’s what happened.

When we asked Simac for evidence to back her claim, she asked people who received the calls to contact PolitiFact Wisconsin directly.

We received calls from 17 people and e-mails from more than 30 others. We interviewed 10 of the people who called. Here’s what we found:

  • The calls began days after the Holperin recall committee filed its petitions in Madison on April 21, 2011. Some people said they received one call, while others said they received two or more.
  • Many of the people, including five we interviewed, said the callers identified themselves as representing the Wisconsin Democratic Party.
  • Some of the people said the callers identified themselves as being from Minnesota. And one caller, when pressed by a woman he called, said he was being paid by Meyer Teleservices, a telemarketing company in St. Cloud, Minn.
  • Nearly everyone who contacted us said they were asked if they understood what they had signed. "It was questions as though, ‘Do you know what you’re doing?’ It was very irritating," said Robert Means of Eagle River. Others said the callers were polite and they didn’t feel harassed.
  • Some people said the callers told them that some people had been misled about what they were signing. "They stated the signers were lied to on what the petitions were for," said Jeff Kirschmann of Eagle River, one of five people we interviewed who signed petitions and also circulated them. "It really irritates me that they called us liars."

Those statements back the claim made by Simac.

What did Holperin and the Democrats have to say about it?

Holperin said he authorized the Wisconsin Democratic Party to call about 5,000 of the people who signed recall petitions against him.

Graeme Zielinski, spokesman for the party, said the Minnesota telemarketing firm was hired to call people who signed petitions against Holperin and against two other Democrats who are facing possible recall elections.

Holperin said he authorized the calls because, although petition circulators who worked under Simac were "earnest, honest and friendly," more than a third of the 23,000 signatures were collected by Kennedy Enterprises, a Colorado marketing and consulting firm hired by the Wisconsin Republican Party. Those petition circulators were often aggressive and misleading when they asked residents to sign petitions, Holperin said.

According to Holperin, 534 petition signers -- about 10 percent of those who were called by the Minnesota telemarketing firm -- said they were given misleading information and that they asked to have their names removed from the petitions. He said that was the basis for a complaint he filed with the Government Accountability Board challenging the petitions.

Holperin provided a script that he said the firm used in asking questions of people who signed recall petitions against him. The script shows that, among other things, callers were to: identify themselves as representing the Wisconsin Democratic Party; ask people whether they were aware their signatures appeared on a Holperin recall petition; and state that reports had been received that "out-of-state paid circulators were misleading people about what they were being asked to sign."

"So, did we ‘insinuate’ that foul play had occurred?," Holperin said. "You bet we did, and we think we offered ample evidence that backs up our claim."

Let’s wrap up.

Simac said people who signed Holperin recall petitions received "harassing phone calls from out-of-state telemarketers claiming to represent the Democratic Party and insinuating foul play by petition circulators."

Some people who received calls said they felt harassed even if they received just one call because they didn’t expect to be questioned about signing a petition. The callers were employed by an out-of-state firm, they did identify themselves as representing the Wisconsin Democratic Party and did claim that petition circulators misled signers of the petitions.

We rate Simac’s claim as True.

 

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About this statement:

Published: Wednesday, May 18th, 2011 at 9:00 a.m.

Subjects: Elections, State Budget

Sources:

Committee to Recall Jim Holperin, "Out-of-state telemarketers paid by Democratic Party harass 12th District constituents" news release, April 29, 2011

Interview, Jim Buckley of Antigo, May 12, 2011

Interview, Charlie Gullan of Eagle River, May 12, 2011

Interview, Barbara Keen of Antigo, May 14, 2011

Interview, Jeff Kirschmann of Eagle River, May 14, 2011

Interview, Robert Means of Eagle River, May 14, 2011

Interview, Pat Powell of Antigo, May 12, 2011

Interview, Pat Powell of Antigo, May 12, 2011

Interview, Dennis Van Ooyen of Antigo, May 16, 2011

Interview, Paula Visner of Eagle River, May 16, 2011

Interview, Jane Wierschem of Minocqua, May 16, 2011

Voicemail from Carl Adkins of Crivitz, May 11, 2011

Voicemail from Joan Benishek of Antigo, May 11, 2011

Voicemail from Roy Kleisch of Antigo, May 11, 2011

Voicemail from Jim Novak of Eagle River, May 11, 2011

Voicemail from Tracey Novak of Antigo, May 13, 2011

Voicemail from Ann Rozga of Eagle River, May 11, 2011

Voicemail from Bessie Steger of Antigo, May 11, 2011

Voicemail from Earl Steger of Antigo, May 11, 2011

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Recall signature drive ending Monday," May 16, 2011

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "State recall movement stands alone in U.S. history," March 12, 2011

Wisconsin Government Accountability Board, Sen. Jim Holperin complaint challenging recall petitions filed against him, May 5, 2011

Sen. Jim Holperin, script used by telemarketing firm in calling people whose names appeared on his recall petitions

E-mail interview, Sen. Jim Holperin, May 11, 2011

E-mail interview, Wisconsin Democratic Party spokesman Graeme Zielinski, May 16, 2011

Vilas County Republican Party, Kim Simac announcement that she would run against Jim Holperin, May 4, 2011

Written by: Tom Kertscher
Researched by: Tom Kertscher
Edited by: Greg Borowski

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