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    "results": [
        {
            "id": 18283,
            "slug": "it-has-not-been-confirmed-joe-exotic-has-covid-19",
            "speaker": {
                "slug": "blog-posting",
                "full_name": "Bloggers",
                "first_name": "",
                "last_name": "Bloggers"
            },
            "targets": [],
            "statement": "“Joe Exotic tests positive for coronavirus in prison. It’s been confirmed.”",
            "ruling_slug": "false",
            "publication_date": "2020-04-03T17:38:51-04:00",
            "ruling_comments": "<p>New routines have emerged for Americans living under quarantine. Some have started making their own sourdough. Many others have settled into their couches and binge-watched &quot;<a href=\"https://www.netflix.com/title/81115994\">Tiger King</a>,&quot; the Netflix documentary about a former big cat breeder, Joseph Maldonado-Passage, aka Joe Exotic.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>In January, Maldonado-Passage <a href=\"https://www.nbcnews.com/news/animal-news/wildlife-park-owner-joe-exotic-sentenced-22-years-plot-kill-n1120566\">was sentenced to 22 years in prison</a> after he was found guilty in a murder-for-hire scheme.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>Now, some people are saying he&rsquo;s contracted COVID-19 in custody.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>&quot;Joe Exotic tests positive for coronavirus in prison,&quot; reads the headline of <a href=\"https://web.archive.org/web/20200403193213/https://www.studentproblems.com/joe-exotic-tests-positive-for-coronavirus-in-prison/?fbclid=IwAR0ESpsVVazd5sHhfzvhKIrL87u81g66uwt7-XEf3lswGpmK9xPvGeAD8ho\">an April 3 blog post</a> on studentproblems.com. &quot;It&rsquo;s been confirmed.&quot;&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>The story goes on to say that &quot;the Tiger King has been moved to a prison hospital for treatment.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>This post was flagged as part of Facebook&rsquo;s efforts to combat false news and misinformation on its News Feed. (Read more about our <a href=\"https://www.facebook.com/help/1952307158131536?helpref=related\">partnership with Facebook</a>.)&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>Maldonado-Passage is <a href=\"https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/joe-exotic-netflix-s-tiger-king-coronavirus-quarantine-his-husband-n1174406\">in self-isolation</a>, according to his husband, Dillon Passage. But that&rsquo;s because other inmates at a jail where he was held tested positive for COVID-19, according to an April 1 NBC News story.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>Vanity Fair <a href=\"https://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2020/04/joe-exotic-coronavirus-tiger-king\">reported on April 3</a> that Maldonado-Passage was placed under quarantine after moving to a new detention facility.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>The New York Post <a href=\"https://nypost.com/2020/04/02/joe-exotic-transferred-to-prison-medical-center-from-coronavirus-isolation/\">reported on April 2</a> that Maldonado-Passage was transferred from coronavirus isolation to a prison medical center in Fort Worth, Texas. The medical center told the Post that Maldonado-Passage&rsquo;s condition &quot;is not public.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>&quot;We speak, like, three to five times every day, but since he&rsquo;s been moved to this new facility, they are putting him on COVID-19 isolation because of the previous jail he was at, there were cases,&quot; Passage <a href=\"https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R7CEN_iaYC0&amp;feature=youtu.be\">told Andy Cohen on a SiriusXM show</a>.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>Initial reports from British tabloids said that Maldonado-Passage had contracted COVID-19 in prison, according to Vanity Fair, but the publication says &quot;that rumor has not yet been proven.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>An Oklahoma City Fox News affiliate <a href=\"https://okcfox.com/news/local/tiger-king-joe-exotic-under-coronavirus-quarantine-in-fort-worth-tx\">reported on April 2</a> that a post on Maldonado-Passage&rsquo;s Facebook page claims he does not have the disease.</p>\n\n<p>&quot;Joe DOES NOT have the COVID-19 virus,&quot; <a href=\"https://www.facebook.com/joejschreibvogel/posts/1514569812045150\">the Facebook post says</a>. &quot;He&rsquo;s in a 14-day quarantine because he was transferred from another facility.&quot;&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>We rate this blog post False.</p>\n\n<div>&nbsp;</div>",
            "sources": "<p>Studentproblems.com, <a href=\"https://web.archive.org/web/20200403193213/https://www.studentproblems.com/joe-exotic-tests-positive-for-coronavirus-in-prison/?fbclid=IwAR0ESpsVVazd5sHhfzvhKIrL87u81g66uwt7-XEf3lswGpmK9xPvGeAD8ho\">Joe Exotic tests positive for coronavirus in prison</a>, April 3, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Netflix, &quot;<a href=\"https://www.netflix.com/title/81115994\">Tiger King</a>,&quot; visited April 3, 2020</p>\n\n<p>NBC News, <a href=\"https://www.nbcnews.com/news/animal-news/wildlife-park-owner-joe-exotic-sentenced-22-years-plot-kill-n1120566\">Wildlife park owner &lsquo;Joe Exotic&rsquo; sentenced to 22 years in plot to kill animal rights activist</a>, Jan. 20, 2020</p>\n\n<p>NBC News, <a href=\"https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/joe-exotic-netflix-s-tiger-king-coronavirus-quarantine-his-husband-n1174406\">Joe Exotic from Netflix&rsquo;s &lsquo;Tiger King&rsquo; is in coronavirus quarantine</a>, his husband says, April 1, 2020</p>\n\n<p>YouTube, <a href=\"https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R7CEN_iaYC0&amp;feature=youtu.be\">Andy Cohen talks exclusively with &quot;Tiger King&quot; Joe Exotic&rsquo;s husband Dillon Passage</a>, April 1, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Vanity Fair, <a href=\"https://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2020/04/joe-exotic-coronavirus-tiger-king\">Yes, Tiger King&rsquo;s Joe Exotic is under quarantine amid coronavirus concerns</a>, April 3, 2020</p>\n\n<p>New York Post, <a href=\"https://nypost.com/2020/04/02/joe-exotic-transferred-to-prison-medical-center-from-coronavirus-isolation/\">Joe Exotic transferred from coronavirus isolation to prison medical center</a>, April 3, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Joseph A. Maldonado-Passage Facebook <a href=\"https://www.facebook.com/joejschreibvogel/posts/1514569812045150\">post</a>, April 2, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Fox 25, &lsquo;Tiger King&rsquo; <a href=\"https://okcfox.com/news/local/tiger-king-joe-exotic-under-coronavirus-quarantine-in-fort-worth-tx\">Joe Exotic charging for email, letters under coronavirus quarantine</a>, April 2, 2020</p>\n\n<div>&nbsp;</div>"
        },
        {
            "id": 18282,
            "slug": "fact-checking-conspiracy-theory-about-5g-and-coron",
            "speaker": {
                "slug": "facebook-posts",
                "full_name": "Facebook posts",
                "first_name": "",
                "last_name": "Facebook posts"
            },
            "targets": [],
            "statement": "Says a “5G LAW PASSED while everyone was distracted” with the coronavirus pandemic and lists 20 symptoms associated with 5G exposure.",
            "ruling_slug": "barely-true",
            "publication_date": "2020-04-03T17:28:39-04:00",
            "ruling_comments": "<p>A conspiracy theory with roots in a Russian propaganda campaign is getting new life amid the coronavirus pandemic.</p>\n\n<p>In <a href=\"http://archive.is/JVPlN\">a March 28 post</a>, a Facebook user refers to Public Law No. 116-129 and claims the government is taking advantage of the COVID-19 pandemic to distract from the installation of 5G cellular data towers. The technology is the latest upgrade to speed up wireless internet connections.</p>\n\n<p>&quot;5G LAW PASSED while everyone was distracted,&quot; the post reads. &quot;Signed into law 116-129 on 3-23-2020, that will speed up the installation of 5G and protect profits! Children had to be out of schools for the covert installation. Parents are you seeing what&#39;s happening?&quot;</p>\n\n<p>The post also lists 20 purported symptoms of 5G exposure, including shortness of breath and fever &mdash;&nbsp;symptoms <a href=\"https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html\">similar to those</a> of COVID-19.</p>\n\n<p>The posts were flagged as part of Facebook&rsquo;s efforts to combat false news and misinformation on its News Feed. (Read more about our <a href=\"https://www.facebook.com/help/1952307158131536?helpref=related\">partnership with Facebook</a>.)</p>\n\n<div class=\"artembed\">See Figure 1 on PolitiFact.com</div>\n\n<p><em>(Screenshot from Facebook)</em></p>\n\n<p><a href=\"https://www.politifact.com/factchecks/2020/mar/09/facebook-posts/no-evidence-coronavirus-was-faked-cover-5g-syndrom/\">We&rsquo;ve fact-checked</a> other conspiracy theories that falsely connect the coronavirus outbreak to the development of 5G, so we wanted to look into this one, too.</p>\n\n<p>There is no evidence that the new law was deliberately passed during the COVID-19 pandemic. And while some experts have speculated that 5G&rsquo;s high-frequency radio waves could have some adverse health effects, such as neurological disorders, other reports say the fear is overblown.</p>\n\n<div class=\"pf_subheadline\">Trump signs law to protect 5G systems</div>\n\n<p>On March 23, President Donald Trump <a href=\"https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/senate-bill/893\">signed a law</a> that requires the president to work with federal agencies to &quot;secure and protect&quot; 5G infrastructure in the United States.</p>\n\n<p>&quot;The Act requires the President to develop and implement a strategy for the adoption of secure wireless communications technology in the United States and abroad,&quot; Trump said in <a href=\"https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/statement-by-the-president-36/\">a White House statement</a>. &quot;The strategy will protect the American people from security threats to telecommunications networks and 5G technology.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>The Secure 5G and Beyond Act contains a provision to &quot;protect the competitiveness of United States companies,&quot; but it says nothing about the &quot;covert installation&quot; of 5G towers, as the Facebook post claims. The legislation is not specifically focused on speeding up the implementation of 5G.</p>\n\n<p>By March 23, the coronavirus crisis was well underway in the U.S. The World Health Organization <a href=\"https://www.who.int/docs/default-source/coronaviruse/situation-reports/20200323-sitrep-63-covid-19.pdf?sfvrsn=b617302d_4\">reported</a> 31,573 confirmed cases across the country, and Trump said <a href=\"https://www.c-span.org/video/?470599-1/president-trump-coronavirus-task-force-hold-briefing-white-house\">during a press briefing</a> that the numbers &quot;are going to increase with time.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>However, there is no evidence that Congress waited to pass the 5G law during the coronavirus outbreak. Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, introduced the legislation last spring, and the Senate Commerce Committee finalized it in December. The full Senate passed the bill on March 4.</p>\n\n<div class=\"pf_subheadline\">Is 5G dangerous?</div>\n\n<p>The second part of the Facebook post lists a slew of symptoms purportedly associated with exposure to 5G networks. While some experts are concerned about the potential health effects of 5G, there is no evidence to support the flu-like effects listed in the post.</p>\n\n<p>Joel Moskowitz, director of the Center for Family and Community Health in the School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley, supports a moratorium on 5G development. He <a href=\"https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/we-have-no-reason-to-believe-5g-is-safe/\">wrote</a> in Scientific American that there could be health effects and that research needs to be funded.</p>\n\n<p>&quot;The latest cellular technology, 5G, will employ millimeter waves for the first time in addition to microwaves that have been in use for older cellular technologies, 2G through 4G,&quot; he wrote. &quot;Given limited reach, 5G will require cell antennas every 100 to 200 meters, exposing many people to millimeter wave radiation.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>Short-term exposure to millimeter waves can cause physiological effects in the nervous system, immune system and cardiovascular system, while long-term exposure could lead to conditions like melanoma and sterility, according to Moskowitz. However, he also wrote that there is no research to confirm a correlation between 5G exposure and those broad health conditions, much less the very specific symptoms listed in the Facebook post.</p>\n\n<p><strong><em>RELATED:</em> <a href=\"https://www.politifact.com/factchecks/2020/mar/09/facebook-posts/no-evidence-coronavirus-was-faked-cover-5g-syndrom/\">No evidence that coronavirus was faked to cover up &lsquo;5G Syndrome&rsquo;</a></strong></p>\n\n<p>And other reports say the fears of 5G exposure are overblown:</p>\n\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t<p>&quot;The vast majority of evidence says there&rsquo;s no reason to pause deployments.&quot; &mdash; Rod Waterhouse, an electrical engineer, wireless-communications entrepreneur and editor of a report on 5G, <a href=\"https://spectrum.ieee.org/news-from-around-ieee/the-institute/ieee-member-news/will-5g-be-bad-for-our-health\">speaking</a> to the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers</p>\n\t</li>\n\t<li>\n\t<p>&quot;There&rsquo;s little reason to think 5G frequencies are any more harmful than other types of electromagnetic radiation, like visible light.&quot; &mdash; <a href=\"https://www.wired.com/story/worried-5g-health-effects-dont-be/\">Wired</a> magazine</p>\n\t</li>\n\t<li>\n\t<p>&quot;The 5G Health Hazard That Isn&rsquo;t &mdash; How one scientist and his inaccurate chart led to unwarranted fears of wireless technology.&quot; &mdash; New York Times <a href=\"https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/16/science/5g-cellphones-wireless-cancer.html\">headline</a></p>\n\t</li>\n</ul>\n\n<div class=\"pf_subheadline\">5G falsehoods echo Russian propaganda</div>\n\n<p>False and misleading social media posts about 5G and coronavirus are similar to a Russian propaganda campaign that&rsquo;s aimed at delegitimizing the technology&rsquo;s implementation in the U.S.</p>\n\n<p>In May 2019, the New York Times <a href=\"https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/12/science/5g-phone-safety-health-russia.html\">reported</a> that Russian network RT America was airing unsubstantiated reports linking 5G exposure to brain cancer, infertility and autism.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>&quot;It&rsquo;s economic warfare,&quot; Ryan Fox, chief operating officer of technology firm New Knowledge, told the New York Times. &quot;Russia doesn&rsquo;t have a good 5G play, so it tries to undermine and discredit ours.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>Hundreds of blogs and websites have republished RT&rsquo;s dubious claims about 5G, according to the newspaper. And over the past week, we&rsquo;ve seen dozens of Facebook and Instagram posts build on that misinformation by baselessly linking the coronavirus pandemic to the development of 5G.</p>\n\n<div class=\"artembed\">See Figure 2 on PolitiFact.com</div>\n\n<p><em>(Screenshot from Instagram)</em></p>\n\n<p>The conspiracies are particularly popular among anti-vaccine and alternative-health Facebook groups and Instagram accounts.</p>\n\n<p>In <a href=\"http://archive.is/3uvk6\">a March 30 Instagram post</a>, which has more than 146,000 likes, Robert F. Kennedy Jr. promoted a conspiracy theory about 5G and the coronavirus. Kennedy, the nephew of former President John F. Kennedy, is <a href=\"https://arstechnica.com/science/2019/11/robert-f-kennedy-jr-is-the-single-leading-source-of-anti-vax-ads-on-facebook/\">among the biggest sources</a> of anti-vaccine advertisements on Facebook.</p>\n\n<p>&quot;The quarantine has facilitated the unobstructed #5G rollout,&quot; Kennedy said in his post, which echoes the claims made in the March 28 Facebook post.</p>\n\n<p>According to Google Trends, search queries for &quot;coronavirus 5G&quot; have spiked since early March.</p>\n\n<div class=\"artembed\">See Figure 3 on PolitiFact.com</div>\n\n<div class=\"pf_subheadline\">Our ruling</div>\n\n<p>A Facebook post claimed that the government used the coronavirus pandemic to distract from the passage of a 5G law.</p>\n\n<p>Trump signed a law March 23 that aims to &quot;secure and protect&quot; 5G infrastructure in the U.S. The legislation has a provision to protect American companies, but it says nothing about installing more 5G towers.</p>\n\n<p>While some experts have said there could be adverse health effects associated with 5G, other reports say the fears are overblown. Misinformation about 5G and the coronavirus can be traced to a Russian propaganda campaign that seeks to delegitimize the implementation of 5G.</p>\n\n<p>The Facebook post contains an element of truth but ignores critical facts that would give a different impression. We rate it Mostly False.</p>",
            "sources": "<p>Ars Technica, &quot;<a href=\"https://arstechnica.com/science/2019/11/robert-f-kennedy-jr-is-the-single-leading-source-of-anti-vax-ads-on-facebook/\">Robert F. Kennedy Jr. is the single leading source of anti-vax ads on Facebook</a>,&quot; Nov. 14, 2019</p>\n\n<p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, <a href=\"https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html\">Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19): Symptoms of Coronavirus</a>, accessed April 3, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Congress.gov, <a href=\"https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/senate-bill/893\">S.893 - Secure 5G and Beyond Act of 2020</a>, accessed April 3, 2020</p>\n\n<p>CrowdTangle, accessed April 3, 2020</p>\n\n<p>C-SPAN, &quot;<a href=\"https://www.c-span.org/video/?470599-1/president-trump-coronavirus-task-force-hold-briefing-white-house\">President Trump Holds Coronavirus Task Force Briefing</a>,&quot; March 23, 2020</p>\n\n<p><a href=\"http://archive.is/JVPlN#selection-1425.49-1425.87\">Facebook post</a>, March 29, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Google Trends, accessed April 3, 2020</p>\n\n<p><a href=\"http://archive.is/3uvk6\">Instagram post</a> from Robert F. Kennedy Jr., March 30, 2020</p>\n\n<p>The New York Times, &quot;<a href=\"https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/07/world/europe/russias-rt-the-network-implicated-in-us-election-meddling.html\">Russia&rsquo;s RT: The Network Implicated in U.S. Election Meddling</a>,&quot; Jan. 7, 2017</p>\n\n<p>The New York Times, &quot;<a href=\"https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/12/science/5g-phone-safety-health-russia.html\">Your 5G Phone Won&rsquo;t Hurt You. But Russia Wants You to Think Otherwise.</a>&quot; May 12, 2019</p>\n\n<p>PolitiFact, &quot;<a href=\"https://www.politifact.com/factchecks/2020/mar/09/facebook-posts/no-evidence-coronavirus-was-faked-cover-5g-syndrom/\">No evidence that coronavirus was faked to cover up &lsquo;5G Syndrome</a>,&rsquo;&quot; March 9, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Scientific American, &quot;<a href=\"https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/we-have-no-reason-to-believe-5g-is-safe/\">We Have No Reason to Believe 5G Is Safe</a>,&quot; Oct. 17, 2019</p>\n\n<p>The White House, &quot;<a href=\"https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/statement-by-the-president-36/\">Statement by the President</a>,&quot; March 23, 2020</p>\n\n<p>World Health Organization, &quot;<a href=\"https://www.who.int/docs/default-source/coronaviruse/situation-reports/20200323-sitrep-63-covid-19.pdf?sfvrsn=b617302d_4\">Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) Situation Report &ndash; 63</a>,&quot; March 23, 2020</p>"
        },
        {
            "id": 18281,
            "slug": "letting-fever-run-fight-coronavirus-could-be-risky",
            "speaker": {
                "slug": "facebook-posts",
                "full_name": "Facebook posts",
                "first_name": "",
                "last_name": "Facebook posts"
            },
            "targets": [],
            "statement": "Says for otherwise healthy people “experiencing mild to moderate respiratory symptoms with or without a COVID-19 diagnosis … only high temperatures kill a virus, so let your fever run high,” but not over 103 or 104 degrees.",
            "ruling_slug": "barely-true",
            "publication_date": "2020-04-03T16:26:26-04:00",
            "ruling_comments": "<p>If you&rsquo;re a mostly healthy person who contracts the coronavirus, will letting your fever run high help get rid of it?</p>\n\n<p>That&rsquo;s what a post shared on Facebook suggests. It says:&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>&quot;Passing along corona advise from a retired respiratory therapist&quot; for &quot;the otherwise generally healthy population.&quot;&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>It lists eight recommendations, starting with:</p>\n\n<p>&quot;For people experiencing mild to moderate respiratory symptoms with or without a COVID-19 diagnosis. &hellip; Only high temperatures kill a virus, so let your fever run high. &hellip; Use common sense and don&#39;t let fever go over 103 or 104 if you got the guts.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>The final recommendation is: &quot;If your still dying go to ER.&quot; (Yes, it says, &quot;advise&quot; instead of &quot;advice&quot; and &quot;your&quot; instead of &quot;you&rsquo;re&quot; in the post.)&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>The <a href=\"https://www.facebook.com/jaimie.sweeten/posts/3175801195785781\">post</a> was flagged as part of Facebook&rsquo;s efforts to combat false news and misinformation on its News Feed. (Read more about our <a href=\"https://www.facebook.com/help/1952307158131536?helpref=related\">partnership</a> with Facebook.)</p>\n\n<p>We&rsquo;ll first note that it&rsquo;s best to take your medical advice from health care professionals, not from random Facebook posts.</p>\n\n<p>Doctors say it&rsquo;s true that a high temperature can help the body fight off a virus, but not enough is known about the new coronavirus to support the post&rsquo;s advice, and running a high fever could be dangerous.</p>\n\n<div class=\"pf_subheadline\">What is a fever?</div>\n\n<p>A <a href=\"https://www.cdc.gov/quarantine/air/reporting-deaths-illness/definitions-symptoms-reportable-illnesses.html\">fever</a> means you have a temperature of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit (38 degrees Celsius) or higher, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>Fevers are a common sign of illness, but they also play a key <a href=\"https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/fever/in-depth/fever/art-20050997\">role</a> in fighting infections.</p>\n\n<p>Generally speaking, a fever is &quot;basically a symptom of your immune system trying to fight the virus&quot; Richard Watanabe, a professor of preventive medicine at the University of Southern California, told PolitiFact. &quot;The higher temperature does make it more difficult for some viruses to survive.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>The Mayo Clinic offers general <a href=\"https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/fever/in-depth/fever/art-20050997\">tips</a> &mdash; for otherwise healthy people and not specifically for coronavirus &mdash; on deciding whether to treat a fever or let it run its course. For example, for adults with a temperature above 102, Mayo recommends acetaminophen (Tylenol and other brands), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB) or aspirin.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>But it says treatment decisions also depend on age, medical history, other symptoms and other factors,&nbsp; not just temperature.</p>\n\n<div class=\"pf_subheadline\">Fever and the coronavirus</div>\n\n<p>Fever, along with cough and shortness of breath, is among the <a href=\"https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/symptoms.html\">symptoms</a> of COVID-19. If you have symptoms and think you have been exposed to COVID-19, call your healthcare provider, the CDC advises.</p>\n\n<p>CDC&rsquo;s <a href=\"https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/if-you-are-sick/steps-when-sick.html\">Self-Checker</a> tool can help you make decisions about seeking medical care. Mayo Clinic also offers a <a href=\"https://www.mayoclinic.org/covid-19-self-assessment-tool\">tool</a> that helps you decide on seeking medical care and whether you need a COVID-19 test.</p>\n\n<p>If you&rsquo;ll be treating COVID-19 symptoms at home, get enough rest, stay well-hydrated, and take medications to relieve fever and aches and pains, Harvard Medical School <a href=\"https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/treatments-for-covid-19\">says</a>.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>For fever, aches and pains, the school recommends acetaminophen. But if you are taking any combination cold or flu medicine, keep track of all the ingredients and doses, and make sure not to exceed a total of 3,000 milligrams of acetaminophen per day.</p>\n\n<p>Mayo Clinic <a href=\"https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/coronavirus/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20479976\">recommends</a> rest and fluids, as well as cough medication, and pain relievers such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>There have been some claims that using ibuprofen to treat coronavirus symptoms is risky. We <a href=\"https://www.politifact.com/article/2020/mar/20/it-true-taking-ibuprofen-covid-19-could-cause-more/\">found</a> that some medical experts believe ibuprofen&rsquo;s anti-inflammatory properties could damp the immune system&rsquo;s ability to fight off COVID-19. But experts say this is just a theory and that there&rsquo;s no scientific evidence that links ibuprofen and other anti-inflammatory medications with COVID-19 complications.</p>\n\n<p>That said, there is no rule that says you need to lower a fever with over-the-counter medication if you&rsquo;re feeling only mild symptoms and are not uncomfortable, Consumer Reports <a href=\"https://www.consumerreports.org/medical-symptoms/fever-and-covid-19-what-to-know/\">says</a> in an article on COVID-19 and fevers. It lists a cold compress for sweating and blankets for chills, along with rest and liquids, as alternatives.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>The article says there is an argument for letting a fever run its course, because lowering a fever with medication might suppress your body&rsquo;s ability to fend off illness, &quot;but if your fever is running at or above 103 degrees, you should call a doctor. A high fever could lead to a seizure or brain damage.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>Dr. Myron Cohen, professor of medicine, microbiology and immunology, and epidemiology at the University of North Carolina and director of its Institute for Global Health &amp; Infectious Diseases, told PolitiFact that while there is research suggesting that fever can defend against infection, &quot;it is extremely difficult to relate the magnitude of fever to the severity of infection, or to demonstrate the benefits of fever for any given microorganism,&quot; including the COVID-19 virus.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>The body&rsquo;s immune response is the most important factor in killing the virus, said Dr. Wilbur Chen, an infectious disease physician-scientist at the University of Maryland. &quot;The fever response is just one of the symptoms that are experienced when the immune response is revved up when fighting the virus. It is like what smoke is to fire&mdash;the point is that you are not focusing your concern on putting out the smoke; you want to put out the fire,&quot; he said.</p>\n\n<p>Said Watanabe: &quot;The caveat here is how heat-tolerant is COVID-19? That is, as far as I am aware, an unanswered question. There are viruses that are relatively heat-tolerant, so your body&rsquo;s fever defense may not be effective.&quot;</p>\n\n<div class=\"pf_subheadline\">Our ruling</div>\n\n<p>A Facebook post advises that generally healthy people &quot;experiencing mild to moderate respiratory symptoms with or without a COVID-19 diagnosis&quot; should &quot;let your fever run high&quot; to kill a coronavirus.</p>\n\n<p>Generally speaking, a fever under 103 degrees doesn&rsquo;t necessarily need treatment. But that depends on other factors, such as age, underlying health conditions and other symptoms.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>Higher temperatures and persistent fevers are dangerous. And it isn&rsquo;t yet known whether a fever might help the body fight the novel coronavirus, as it does other viruses.</p>\n\n<p>The advice on letting a fever run high to fight the coronavirus, even with generally healthy people and mild to moderate respiratory symptoms, is too broad. We rate it Mostly False.</p>",
            "sources": "<p>Facebook, <a href=\"https://www.facebook.com/jaimie.sweeten/posts/3175801195785781\">post</a>, March 28, 2020</p>\n\n<p>U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, <a href=\"http://symptoms\">&quot;Symptoms,&quot;</a> Feb. 29, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Harvard Medical School, <a href=\"https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/treatments-for-covid-19\">&quot;Treatments for COVID-19,&quot;</a> March 2020</p>\n\n<p>Email, Dr. Wilbur Chen, infectious disease physician-scientist at the University of Maryland, April 3, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Mayo Clinic, <a href=\"https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/coronavirus/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20479976\">&quot;Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19),&quot;</a> accessed April 2, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Mayo Clinic, <a href=\"https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/fever/in-depth/fever/art-20050997\">&quot;Fever treatment: Quick guide to treating a fever,&quot;</a> accessed April 2, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Consumer Reports, <a href=\"https://www.consumerreports.org/medical-symptoms/fever-and-covid-19-what-to-know/\">&quot;What to Know About Fever and COVID-19,&quot;</a> April 2, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Email, Dr. Myron Cohen, professor of medicine, microbiology and immunology, and epidemiology at the University of North Carolina and director of its Institute for Global Health &amp; Infectious Diseases, April 3, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Johns Hopkins Medicine, <a href=\"https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/coronavirus-what-if-i-feel-sick\">&quot;Coronavirus (COVID-19): What Do I Do If I Feel Sick?&quot;</a> April 2, 2020</p>\n\n<p>PolitiFact, <a href=\"https://www.politifact.com/article/2020/mar/20/it-true-taking-ibuprofen-covid-19-could-cause-more/\">&quot;Will taking ibuprofen for COVID-19 cause more health problems? It&rsquo;s complicated,&quot;</a> March 20, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Kaiser Health News, <a href=\"https://www.nytimes.com/article/coronavirus-temperature-fever-thermometer.html\">&quot;Temperature Check: Tracking Fever, a Key Symptom of Coronavirus,&quot;</a> March 30, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Email interview, <a href=\"https://keck.usc.edu/faculty-search/richard-m-watanabe/\">Richard Watanabe</a>, professor of preventive medicine at the University of Southern California&rsquo;s Kerk School of Medicine, April 3, 2020</p>"
        },
        {
            "id": 18280,
            "slug": "hospital-beds-being-kept-empty-prepare-covid-influ",
            "speaker": {
                "slug": "facebook-posts",
                "full_name": "Facebook posts",
                "first_name": "",
                "last_name": "Facebook posts"
            },
            "targets": [],
            "statement": "Pictures and reports of “empty hospitals” prove COVID-19 spread is “fake crisis for real government planned agendas.”",
            "ruling_slug": "false",
            "publication_date": "2020-04-03T16:09:23-04:00",
            "ruling_comments": "<p>As the death toll from the coronavirus continues to climb, some <a href=\"https://twitter.com/toddstarnes/status/1243302444970520578\">conservative</a> <a href=\"https://www.mediamatters.org/coronavirus-covid-19/fox-news-contributor-i-am-seeing-videos-twitter-empty-hospital-parking-lots\">commentators</a> <a href=\"https://www.nbcnews.com/tech/social-media/coronavirus-deniers-take-aim-hospitals-pandemic-grows-n1172336\">questioned</a> how busy American hospitals actually are. On Twitter, photos and video clips purporting to show nearly empty hospital parking lots were <a href=\"https://twitter.com/hashtag/filmyourhospital?src=hashtag_click\">tagged</a> with #FilmYourHospital. More of the same on a YouTube &quot;citizen reporters&quot; <a href=\"https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DK3_6P_JPuc\">video</a>.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>And on Facebook, there were posts such as this one with dark warnings of a conspiracy:</p>\n\n<p>&quot;Nurses reporting hospitals are empty mostly. Fake crisis for real goverment (sic) planned agendas. Wait for them.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>Included were screenshots of other claims that medical professionals are saying their hospitals are empty, or at least slower than usual.</p>\n\n<p>The <a href=\"https://www.facebook.com/zainabkabbasi/posts/10158047991009449\">post</a> was flagged as part of Facebook&rsquo;s efforts to combat false news and misinformation on its News Feed. (Read more about our <a href=\"https://www.facebook.com/help/1952307158131536?helpref=related\">partnership</a> with Facebook.)</p>\n\n<p>We found some hospitals with significant numbers of empty beds. But that&rsquo;s due largely to hospitals keeping beds empty as they prepare for <a href=\"https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/covid-hospitals\">an expected influx of patients</a> who have COVID-19 disease.</p>\n\n<p>&quot;Canceled elective procedures and admissions are freeing up bed space to prepare for (the) surge,&quot; Dr. James Lawler, an infectious diseases expert and internal medicine professor at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, told PolitiFact. &quot;In regions where hospitalization rates from COVID are still relatively low, this is resulting in more empty beds &mdash; which is good. The surge is coming to them as well.&quot;&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>There is plenty of evidence showing how extensive the outbreak is and is expected to continue to be. Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the nation&rsquo;s leading infectious disease expert, <a href=\"https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/31/us/politics/coronavirus-death-toll-united-states.html\">has estimated</a> between 100,000 and 240,000 Americans could die from the pathogen even as communities adopt stronger social distancing measures.</p>\n\n<p>And an <a href=\"https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/covid-hospitals\">analysis</a> from ProPublica and the Harvard Global Health Institute found that even in a &quot;moderate case&quot; scenario &mdash; where 40% of the adult population contracts the disease over the course of a year &mdash; the country would need to more than double available hospital beds by freeing up existing beds or adding new ones.</p>\n\n<p>The report also noted that America lags behind China and Italy, where the epidemic has overwhelmed hospitals, when it comes to hospital bed capacity.</p>\n\n<p>The U.S. has 2.8 hospital beds per 1,000 people, compared with 3.2 in Italy and 4.3 in China. There are also stark regional differences in hospital capacity. Modeling suggests that hospitals in more urban communities will likely be more stressed, but&nbsp; larger hospital systems may also have more flexibility to stretch their resources if they shift patients around to free up beds.</p>\n\n<p>Within days of the Facebook post, one U.S. Navy hospital ship had arrived in Los Angeles, and another was two days from reaching New York City, both to provide <a href=\"https://www.npr.org/sections/coronavirus-live-updates/2020/03/30/823826987/hospital-ship-usns-comfort-arrives-in-new-york-to-ease-coronavirus-pressure\">relief </a>from the coronavirus pandemic, with space for 1,000 beds each.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>Again, there are examples of hospitals with empty beds, but the key reason is that they are clearing out space to treat coronavirus patients. A few we found:</p>\n\n<ul>\n\t<li>\n\t<p>On the day of the Facebook post, only 70% of the beds at the University of Nebraska Medical Center were occupied, spokesman Taylor Wilson told PolitiFact. &quot;It&#39;s only because we&#39;ve canceled elective procedures to prepare for a surge of coronavirus patients,&quot; he said.</p>\n\t</li>\n\t<li>\n\t<p>Two days after the Facebook post, the local newspaper in Syracuse, N.Y., about 250 miles northwest of New York City &mdash; where the outbreak is worst &mdash; <a href=\"https://www.syracuse.com/coronavirus/2020/03/as-coronavirus-patients-cram-nyc-hospitals-syracuse-hospitals-still-have-300-empty-beds.html\">reported</a> that Syracuse&rsquo;s three hospitals had a total of 300 empty beds. That was attributed to cancellations of scheduled non-emergency surgeries and postponements of other hospital admissions, as well as a decline in seasonal flu activity.</p>\n\t</li>\n\t<li>\n\t<p>Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston was only about 65% occupied, well below its usual 99%, because it was preparing for a surge of coronavirus patients, WBUR radio <a href=\"https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2020/03/27/massachusetts-general-icu-empty\">reported</a> three days before the post.</p>\n\t</li>\n\t<li>\n\t<p>In West Virginia, some hospitals are having cash flow problems and at least one, Charleston Area Medical Center, has cut the hours of some employees because of fewer patients and procedures, a statewide radio network <a href=\"http://wvmetronews.com/2020/03/30/beds-empty-revenues-slowed-at-hospitals-in-west-virginia-camc-announces-hours-reduction-measures/\">reported</a>.</p>\n\t</li>\n</ul>\n\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n\n<div class=\"pf_subheadline\">Our ruling</div>\n\n<p>A Facebook post amid the surging coronavirus outbreak claimed nurses are reporting mostly empty hospitals in the United States and suggested it shows a conspiracy to exaggerate the coronavirus outbreak.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>There are hospitals with significant numbers of empty beds, but that&rsquo;s because they are canceling non-urgent surgeries and other procedures in an effort to free up bed space for an expected influx of coronavirus patients. The COVID-19 outbreak is real.</p>\n\n<p>We rate the statement False.</p>",
            "sources": "<p>Facebook, <a href=\"https://www.facebook.com/zainabkabbasi/posts/10158047991009449\">post</a>, March 28, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Email, Dr. <a href=\"https://www.unmc.edu/intmed/divisions/id/faculty/lawler.html\">James Lawler</a>, an infectious diseases expert and internal medicine professor at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and director of international programs and innovation at its Global Center for Health Security, April 1, 2020</p>\n\n<p>WBUR radio, <a href=\"https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2020/03/27/massachusetts-general-icu-empty\">&quot;With Empty Beds And An Expandable ICU, Mass. General &#39;Looks Down The Barrel&#39; Of Outbreak,&quot;</a> March 27, 2020&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>Media Matters for America, <a href=\"https://www.mediamatters.org/coronavirus-covid-19/right-wing-media-figures-spread-empty-hospitals-theory-downplay-threat\">&quot;Right-wing media figures spread &quot;empty hospitals&quot; theory to downplay the threat of coronavirus,&quot;</a> March 30, 2020</p>\n\n<p>U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, <a href=\"https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/cases-updates/cases-in-us.html#cumulative\">&quot;Cases in U.S.,&quot;</a> April 1, 2020&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>PolitiFact, <a href=\"https://www.politifact.com/factchecks/2020/apr/02/jerome-adams/hospitals-refute-surgeon-generals-claim-about-nurs/\">&quot;Hospitals refute surgeon general&rsquo;s claim about nursing furloughs,&quot;</a> April 2, 2020</p>\n\n<p>ProPublica, <a href=\"https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/covid-hospitals\">&quot;Are Hospitals Near Me Ready for Coronavirus? Here Are Nine Different Scenarios,&quot;</a> March 17, 2020</p>\n\n<p>USA Today, <a href=\"https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/health/2020/04/02/coronavirus-pandemic-jobs-us-health-care-workers-furloughed-laid-off/5102320002/\">&quot;Thousands of US medical workers furloughed, laid off as routine patient visits drop during coronavirus pandemic,&quot;</a> April 2, 2020</p>\n\n<p><br>\nWest Virginia Metro News radio network, <a href=\"http://wvmetronews.com/2020/03/30/beds-empty-revenues-slowed-at-hospitals-in-west-virginia-camc-announces-hours-reduction-measures/\">&quot;Beds empty, revenues slowed at hospitals in West Virginia; CAMC announces hours reduction measures,&quot;</a> March 30, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Email, Taylor Wilson, senior media relations coordinator, Nebraska Medicine, April 1, 2020</p>\n\n<p>YouTube, <a href=\"https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DK3_6P_JPuc\">&quot;Citizen reporters go do what the media won&#39;t! Mirror,&quot;</a> April 1, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Raw Story, <a href=\"https://www.rawstory.com/2020/03/coronavirus-truthers-caught-in-epic-lies-and-distorted-stories-about-hospitals-crisis/\">&quot;Coronavirus truthers caught in epic lies and distorted stories about hospitals crisis,&quot;</a> March 30, 2020</p>\n\n<p>PolitiFact, <a href=\"https://www.politifact.com/factchecks/2020/mar/18/sean-hannity/hannity-wrong-health-care-system-ready-coronavirus/\">&quot;Hannity wrong that health care system is ready as is for coronavirus,&quot;</a> March 18, 2020</p>\n\n<p>NBC News, <a href=\"https://www.nbcnews.com/tech/social-media/coronavirus-deniers-take-aim-hospitals-pandemic-grows-n1172336\">&quot;Coronavirus deniers take aim at hospitals as pandemic grows,&quot;</a> March 30, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Syracuse.com, <a href=\"https://www.syracuse.com/coronavirus/2020/03/as-coronavirus-patients-cram-nyc-hospitals-syracuse-hospitals-still-have-300-empty-beds.html\">&quot;As coronavirus patients cram NYC hospitals, Syracuse hospitals still have 300 empty beds,&quot;</a> March 30, 2020</p>\n\n<p>PolitiFact, <a href=\"https://www.politifact.com/factchecks/2020/mar/13/facebook-posts/leaked-documents-dont-prove-us-hospitals-preparing/\">&quot;&lsquo;Leaked documents&rsquo; don&rsquo;t prove US hospitals preparing for 96 million coronavirus cases,&quot;</a> March 13, 2020</p>"
        },
        {
            "id": 18279,
            "slug": "whats-true-whats-not-bidens-attacks-trump-and-gett",
            "speaker": {
                "slug": "joe-biden",
                "full_name": "Joe Biden",
                "first_name": "Joe",
                "last_name": "Biden"
            },
            "targets": [],
            "statement": "“There was no effort” to get American experts into China after it announced the coronavirus, and “we had one person in-country (and Trump) pulled him out of the country.”",
            "ruling_slug": "barely-true",
            "publication_date": "2020-04-03T16:00:59-04:00",
            "ruling_comments": "<p>Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden has targeted what he sees as a couple of key failures by President Donald Trump that made the coronavirus crisis worse. In a CNN virtual town hall, Biden talked about the early days as the virus spread from China.</p>\n\n<p>&quot;I said, among others, that, you know, you should get into China, get our experts there, we have the best in the world, get them in so we know what&#39;s actually happening,&quot; Biden said March 27. &quot;There was no effort to do that. He didn&#39;t put any pressure on (Chinese President) Xi. I guess because of his trade deal, which wasn&#39;t much of a deal. And in addition to that, what happened was, we had one person in-country who was working. He pulled him out of the country.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>There are two claims to sort out: that Trump made no effort to get American epidemiologists into China, and that he pulled out the one person who was working there.</p>\n\n<p>Biden&rsquo;s first claim distorts the American response, and the second skips over other changes that took place at the same time.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<div class=\"pf_subheadline\">China resisted all outsiders</div>\n\n<p>The words of Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar <a href=\"https://www.hhs.gov/about/leadership/secretary/speeches/2020-speeches/remarks-at-coronavirus-press-briefing.html\">on Jan. 28</a> undercut Biden&rsquo;s sweeping statement that &quot;there was no effort&quot; to get experts into China.</p>\n\n<p>Azar said that by Jan. 6, about a week after China confirmed the existence of a new virus, &quot;we offered to send a CDC team to China.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>&quot;I reiterated that offer when I spoke to China&#39;s Minister of Health on Monday (Jan. 27), and it was reiterated again via the World Health Organization today,&quot; Azar said. &quot;We are urging China: More cooperation and transparency are the most important steps you can take toward a more effective response.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>There is no question that China resisted the presence of outside experts.</p>\n\n<p>The World Health Organization was working its own medical diplomacy to get more visibility into the China situation. Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus met with Xi on Jan. 28 in Beijing. That was a month into the pandemic and while <a href=\"https://www.who.int/docs/default-source/coronaviruse/transcripts/who-audio-script-ncov-rresser-unog-29jan2020.pdf?sfvrsn=a7158807_4\">he won approval</a> for the deployment of a WHO team, that didn&rsquo;t happen <a href=\"https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/02/mission-impossible-who-director-fights-prevent-pandemic-without-offending-china#\">until Feb. 10</a>.</p>\n\n<p>The WHO group included some Americans, but in a statement, the Health and Human Services Departments said the Chinese &quot;limited the ability and timing for CDC staff to participate in the WHO joint mission.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>Biden&rsquo;s campaign staff said that Trump himself should have pressed the issue in his conversations with Xi. We asked the White House press office if he had and got no comment.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>Regardless, Azar, a high-ranking member of the cabinet, did tell his Chinese counterpart that the United States was ready to provide people.&nbsp; In a <a href=\"https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1221809170673958913\">Jan. 27 tweet</a>, Trump said he had broadly done&nbsp;the same.</p>\n\n<p>&quot;We have offered China and President Xi any help that is necessary. Our experts are extraordinary,&quot; Trump said.</p>\n\n<div class=\"pf_subheadline\">Removing the one person in China</div>\n\n<p>Biden said Trump pulled the &quot;one person&quot; in China &quot;who was working.&quot; This, his staff said, referred to the July 2019 departure of an American epidemiologist from the CDC&rsquo;s China office. (The CDC maintains offices in countries around the world. The one in China dates back to 2003.)</p>\n\n<p><a href=\"https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-china-cdc-exclusiv/exclusive-u-s-axed-cdc-expert-job-in-china-months-before-virus-outbreak-idUSKBN21910S\">Reuters</a> reported that the CDC epidemiologist, Linda Quick, would have been in a position to help Chinese experts respond to the emerging disease precisely because she was embedded in China&rsquo;s CDC to train Chinese specialists.</p>\n\n<p>The CDC&rsquo;s website shows that the U.S. staff in China went from eight in <a href=\"http://web.archive.org/web/20190305004537/https://www.cdc.gov/globalhealth/countries/china/default.htm\">March 2019</a> to three in <a href=\"http://web.archive.org/web/20191224095317/https://www.cdc.gov/globalhealth/countries/china/default.htm\">December 2019</a>. The change was driven by a shift in the U.S. strategy to combat HIV/AIDS, the U.S. Health and Human Services Department said.</p>\n\n<p>&quot;The President&#39;s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief under the Office of Global AIDS Coordinator moved to a regional model in this region and based on the epidemic in China to date, changes were made to the existing footprint,&quot; the department&rsquo;s statement said.</p>\n\n<p>In <a href=\"https://www.cdc.gov/globalhivtb/where-we-work/China.pdf\">July 2019</a>, the CDC said it would complete its PEPFAR-funded work in China that year.</p>\n\n<p>The department&rsquo;s statement also said that CDC began &quot;scaling up&quot; before the outbreak. That didn&rsquo;t necessarily mean additional U.S. staff. The program hires more Chinese staffers than American ones.</p>\n\n<div class=\"pf_subheadline\">Our ruling</div>\n\n<p>Biden said that Trump made &quot;no effort&quot; to get American experts into China and pulled the &quot;one person&quot; the U.S. had on the ground out of China.</p>\n\n<p>Trump&rsquo;s personal role is unclear, but his Health and Human Services secretary did make the effort to get U.S. experts inside. The department reached out to China in the first week of January, and secretary Azar asked his Chinese counterpart again in late January. China resisted outsiders, both from the U.S. and WHO.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>Biden&rsquo;s assertion that Trump pulled the &quot;one person&quot; out of China has more substance, but is not as straight-forward as he made it sound. An American CDC epidemiologist left in July and was not replaced. The overall American staff went from eight down to three. According to the Health and Human Services Department, the staff reduction was mainly driven by changes in the U.S. strategy to reduce HIV/AIDS. Biden made it sound as though everyone left, but some CDC staff remained.</p>\n\n<p>The first claim is, at best, exaggerated, and the second is murky on the details. We rate Biden&rsquo;s attack Mostly False.</p>",
            "sources": "<p>CNN, <a href=\"http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/2003/27/se.01.html\">Joe Biden Town Hall</a>, March 27, 2020</p>\n\n<p>U.S. Health and Human Services Department, <a href=\"https://www.hhs.gov/about/leadership/secretary/speeches/2020-speeches/remarks-at-coronavirus-press-briefing.html\">Remarks at Coronavirus Press Briefing</a>, Jan. 28, 2020</p>\n\n<p>World Health Organization, <a href=\"https://www.who.int/docs/default-source/coronaviruse/transcripts/who-audio-script-ncov-rresser-unog-29jan2020.pdf?sfvrsn=a7158807_4\">Novel coronavirus press conference at United Nations of Geneva</a>, Jan. 29, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Donald Trump, <a href=\"https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1221809170673958913\">tweet</a>, Jan. 27, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Institut Montaigne, <a href=\"https://www.institutmontaigne.org/en/blog/fighting-coronavirus-pandemic-chinas-influence-world-health-organization\">Fighting the Coronavirus Pandemic: China&#39;s Influence at the World Health Organization</a>, March 23, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Japan Times, <a href=\"https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2020/02/10/asia-pacific/science-health-asia-pacific/advance-team-coronavirus-finally-way-china-tedros-adhanom-ghebreyesus-tweets/#.Xoc2itNKiv4\">WHO advance team on coronavirus finally on way to China</a>, Feb. 10, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Science, <a href=\"https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/02/mission-impossible-who-director-fights-prevent-pandemic-without-offending-china#\">Mission impossible? WHO director fights to prevent a pandemic without offending China</a>, Feb. 10, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Reuters, <a href=\"https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-china-cdc-exclusiv/exclusive-u-s-slashed-cdc-staff-inside-china-prior-to-coronavirus-outbreak-idUSKBN21C3N5\">U.S. slashed CDC staff inside China prior to coronavirus outbreak</a>, March 25, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Reuters, <a href=\"https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-china-cdc-exclusiv/exclusive-u-s-axed-cdc-expert-job-in-china-months-before-virus-outbreak-idUSKBN21910S\">U.S. axed CDC expert job in China months before virus outbreak</a>, March 22, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, <a href=\"https://www.cdc.gov/globalhivtb/where-we-work/China.pdf\">Division of Global HIV and TB: China</a>, July 2019</p>\n\n<p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, <a href=\"http://web.archive.org/web/20190305004537/https://www.cdc.gov/globalhealth/countries/china/default.htm\">Global health: China</a>, March 5, 2019</p>\n\n<p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, <a href=\"http://web.archive.org/web/20191224095317/https://www.cdc.gov/globalhealth/countries/china/default.htm\">Global health: China</a>, Dec. 24, 2019</p>\n\n<p>New York Times, <a href=\"https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/07/health/cdc-coronavirus-china.html\">C.D.C. and W.H.O. Offers to Help China Have Been Ignored for Weeks</a>, Feb. 7, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Factcheck.org, <a href=\"https://www.factcheck.org/2020/04/bidens-false-claim-on-trumps-response-to-coronavirus/\">Biden&rsquo;s False Claim on Trump&rsquo;s Response to Coronavirus</a>, April 1, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Washington Post, <a href=\"https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2020/04/03/how-much-pressure-did-trump-put-china-access-concerning-coronavirus/\">How much pressure did Trump put on China for access concerning the coronavirus?</a>, April 3, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Statement, press office, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, April 3, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Interview, Michael Gwin, spokesman, Biden for President, April 2, 2020</p>\n\n<div>&nbsp;</div>"
        },
        {
            "id": 18278,
            "slug": "nancy-pelosis-daughter-isnt-kennedy-center-board",
            "speaker": {
                "slug": "facebook-posts",
                "full_name": "Facebook posts",
                "first_name": "",
                "last_name": "Facebook posts"
            },
            "targets": [
                {
                    "slug": "nancy-pelosi",
                    "full_name": "Nancy Pelosi",
                    "first_name": "Nancy",
                    "last_name": "Pelosi"
                }
            ],
            "statement": "Says Nancy Pelosi’s “daughter is on the board of the Kennedy Center so that’s why it was so important to send them all that money.”",
            "ruling_slug": "false",
            "publication_date": "2020-04-03T14:54:15-04:00",
            "ruling_comments": "<p>The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts <a href=\"https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/31/arts/kennedy-center-defends-25-million.html\">has come under fire</a> for furloughing workers even after it received $25 million in federal aid as part of a $2 trillion stimulus package to help dull the economic pain caused by the coronavirus pandemic.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>Some Republicans were already critical of funneling money to the Kennedy Center, while Democrats defended the bailout, saying it employs nearly 3,000 people.</p>\n\n<p>But on Facebook, <a href=\"https://www.facebook.com/sdroulias/posts/10219134194817420\">a widely shared post</a> suggests House Speaker Nancy Pelosi&rsquo;s motivations for supporting the line item were personal.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>&quot;So Nancy&rsquo;s daughter is on the board of the Kennedy Center,&quot; the March 30 post says, &quot;so that&rsquo;s why it was so important to send them all that money.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>This post was flagged as part of Facebook&rsquo;s efforts to combat false news and misinformation on its News Feed. (Read more about our <a href=\"https://www.facebook.com/help/1952307158131536?helpref=related\">partnership with Facebook</a>.)&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>The Kennedy Center didn&rsquo;t respond to PolitiFact&rsquo;s email asking about the Facebook post. But Drew Hammill, a spokesman for Pelosi, told us the post isn&rsquo;t true.</p>\n\n<p>None of Pelosi&rsquo;s children appear on <a href=\"https://web.archive.org/save/https://n5ti.com/italy-07099/?fbclid=IwAR2itSaDKrGRBNKGR1ql1G_sHaepNBgu_64euW5MlB0q3kJrZojqWZzhs6M\">the center&rsquo;s list of board of trustee officers</a>, members appointed by the president, honorary trustees or emeritus trustees.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>Nancy Pelosi <a href=\"https://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2006/11/07/10-things-you-didnt-know-about-nancy-pelosi\">has five children</a>: four daughters &mdash;&nbsp;<a href=\"https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/makes-going-to-work-look-easy-how-being-a-full-time-mom-prepared-nancy-pelosi-for-this-moment/2019/02/12/416cd85e-28bc-11e9-984d-9b8fba003e81_story.html?fbclid=IwAR0VXkdyUDhlOYShAIUZNlF3lSUvmEXXqOh5A_Nsc9sf_INFd5cLBDt0sWQ\">Nancy Corinne Prowda</a>, <a href=\"https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/makes-going-to-work-look-easy-how-being-a-full-time-mom-prepared-nancy-pelosi-for-this-moment/2019/02/12/416cd85e-28bc-11e9-984d-9b8fba003e81_story.html?fbclid=IwAR0VXkdyUDhlOYShAIUZNlF3lSUvmEXXqOh5A_Nsc9sf_INFd5cLBDt0sWQ\">Christine Pelosi</a>, <a href=\"https://www.lamag.com/lalifeandstyle/nancy-pelosi-necklace/\">Jacqueline Kenneally</a> and <a href=\"https://www.teenvogue.com/story/house-speaker-nancy-pelosi-daughter-said-mom-cut-off-your-head\">Alexandra Pelosi</a> &mdash;&nbsp;and one son, Paul Pelosi.</p>\n\n<p>Nancy Pelosi is an ex officio member, designated by an act of Congress, according to the Kennedy Center&rsquo;s website. So are Trump administration officials such as Education Secretary Betsy DeVos and Republican lawmakers like Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell; Rep. Kevin McCarthy, the Republican leader of the House; and Sen. Roy Blunt of Missouri. HuffPost <a href=\"https://www.huffpost.com/entry/senate-coronavirus-stimulus-economic-relief-arts-funding_n_5e7d063ac5b6cb08a92a6282\">reported</a> the original budget request for the Kennedy Center came from <a href=\"https://www.kennedy-center.org/press-releases/tracy-henke-announcement/\">a Kennedy Center staffer</a> who was formerly a top aide to Blunt.</p>\n\n<p>In <a href=\"https://checkyourfact.com/2020/03/31/fact-check-nancy-pelosi-daughter-board-kennedy-center/?fbclid=IwAR1bA3BQMrkw8AYvTOAL0rdS_QbHKQzj49Njx37Ii1JTI6c8YuDZzh2WeCk\">an email to the Daily Caller</a>, a spokeswoman for the Kennedy Center said that none of Nancy Pelosi&rsquo;s children are affiliated with the institution, according to the outlet.</p>\n\n<p>We rate this Facebook post False.</p>\n\n<div>&nbsp;</div>",
            "sources": "<p>The New York Times, <a href=\"https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/31/arts/kennedy-center-defends-25-million.html\">As furloughs grow, Kennedy Center defends use of $25 million in aid</a>, March 31, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Facebook <a href=\"https://www.facebook.com/sdroulias/posts/10219134194817420\">post</a>, March 30, 2020</p>\n\n<p>U.S. News &amp; World Report, <a href=\"https://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2006/11/07/10-things-you-didnt-know-about-nancy-pelosi\">10 things you didn&rsquo;t know about Nancy Pelosi</a>, Nov. 7, 2006</p>\n\n<p>Teen Vogue, <a href=\"https://www.teenvogue.com/story/house-speaker-nancy-pelosi-daughter-said-mom-cut-off-your-head\">House Speaker Nancy Pelosi&rsquo;s daughter said her mom will cut off your head</a>, Jan. 3, 2019</p>\n\n<p>The Washington Post, <a href=\"https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/makes-going-to-work-look-easy-how-being-a-full-time-mom-prepared-nancy-pelosi-for-this-moment/2019/02/12/416cd85e-28bc-11e9-984d-9b8fba003e81_story.html?fbclid=IwAR0VXkdyUDhlOYShAIUZNlF3lSUvmEXXqOh5A_Nsc9sf_INFd5cLBDt0sWQ\">&lsquo;Makes going to work look east&rsquo;: decades before she was House Speaker, Nancy Pelosi had an even harder job,</a> Feb. 12, 2019&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>Los Angeles Magazine, <a href=\"https://www.lamag.com/lalifeandstyle/nancy-pelosi-necklace/\">Nancy Pelosi has Donald Trump by the balls (in a manner of speaking)</a>, Oct. 16, 2019</p>\n\n<p>The Kennedy Center, <a href=\"https://www.kennedy-center.org/about-us/leadership/trustees/\">Board of Trustees</a>, visited April 2, 2020</p>\n\n<p>HuffPost, <a href=\"https://www.huffpost.com/entry/senate-coronavirus-stimulus-economic-relief-arts-funding_n_5e7d063ac5b6cb08a92a6282\">Senate Coronavirus Stimulus Includes Arts Funding Despite GOP Dismissing It As Frivolous</a>, March 26, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Check Your Fact, <a href=\"https://checkyourfact.com/2020/03/31/fact-check-nancy-pelosi-daughter-board-kennedy-center/?fbclid=IwAR1bA3BQMrkw8AYvTOAL0rdS_QbHKQzj49Njx37Ii1JTI6c8YuDZzh2WeCk\">Fact Check: Does Nancy Pelosi&rsquo;s daughter sit on the board of the Kennedy Center</a>, March 31, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Email interview with Drew Hammill, deputy chief of staff for Nancy Pelosi, April 3, 2020</p>\n\n<div>&nbsp;</div>"
        },
        {
            "id": 18277,
            "slug": "no-coronavirus-did-not-cause-death-rate-drop-chica",
            "speaker": {
                "slug": "facebook-posts",
                "full_name": "Facebook posts",
                "first_name": "",
                "last_name": "Facebook posts"
            },
            "targets": [],
            "statement": "“In Chicago, Covid-19 actually LOWERED the death rate.”",
            "ruling_slug": "false",
            "publication_date": "2020-04-03T12:13:37-04:00",
            "ruling_comments": "<p>As the coronavirus forces people across the country to stay indoors, questions have emerged over how the pandemic is impacting crime rates.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>It&rsquo;s a debate of particular significance to cities like Chicago, which is accustomed to high levels of violent crime. As of April 1, 2020, the virus sickened <a href=\"http://www.dph.illinois.gov/topics-services/diseases-and-conditions/diseases-a-z-list/coronavirus\">over 3,000 people in Chicago</a> and killed 39 &mdash; even as Illinois officials attempt to contain the spread through a stay-at-home order.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>But a March 22, 2020, Facebook post that <a href=\"https://www.facebook.com/eternal.systems/posts/10157396417219261\">accumulated more than 2,200 shares</a> took it one step further.</p>\n\n<p>&quot;In Chicago, Covid-19 actually LOWERED the death rate,&quot; the post stated, over a background of laughing emojis.</p>\n\n<p>This post was flagged as part of Facebook&rsquo;s efforts to combat false news and misinformation on its News Feed. (Read more about our <a href=\"https://www.facebook.com/help/1952307158131536?helpref=related\">partnership with Facebook</a>.)&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>Murders in Chicago decreased in March 2020 compared to years prior, but officials have yet to attribute that shift to COVID-19.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>And overall, deaths don&rsquo;t appear to be declining.</p>\n\n<div class=\"pf_subheadline\">Death rates in Chicago</div>\n\n<p><a href=\"http://www.dph.illinois.gov/news/city-chicago-announces-first-local-patient-travel-related-case-2019-novel-coronavirus\">The first case of COVID-19 arrived in Illinois</a> in January after a 60-year-old Chicago woman returned from Wuhan, China &mdash; where the virus originated &mdash; but like many states did not see a surge in cases until March. Illinois <a href=\"http://www.dph.illinois.gov/news/public-health-officials-announce-first-illinois-coronavirus-disease-death\">reported its first death</a> on March 17, a patient who was a Chicago resident.</p>\n\n<p>The most recent available numbers on deaths in Chicago come from the Cook County Medical Examiner, which takes cases that require additional investigation to determine a cause of death. If someone was under the care of a doctor when they died, that case wouldn&rsquo;t necessarily go to the medical examiner because the doctor can sign off on their death certificate.</p>\n\n<p>So it&rsquo;s important to note that information from the medical examiner doesn&rsquo;t encompass all deaths in Chicago. But it does provide a valuable snapshot.</p>\n\n<p>The examiner&rsquo;s office handled 413 deaths in Chicago in March, <a href=\"https://datacatalog.cookcountyil.gov/Public-Safety/Medical-Examiner-Case-Archive/cjeq-bs86\">according to its case archive as of April 2</a>. At least 11 of them were tied to COVID-19, while other causes of death ranged from gunshot wounds to cardiovascular disease.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>In March 2019, by comparison, the medical examiner saw 279 deaths in Chicago. There were 301 Chicago cases in March 2018 and 306 in March 2017.</p>\n\n<p>These numbers show the virus doesn&rsquo;t appear to be decreasing deaths as the Facebook post suggested. Instead, officials say it&#39;s likely the opposite.</p>\n\n<p>&quot;The uptick you are seeing is a direct correlation to the rise in COVID-19 cases,&quot; said Natalia Derevyanny, director of communications for the Cook County Bureau of Administration.</p>\n\n<div class=\"pf_subheadline\">The homicide question</div>\n\n<p>Chicago sees high rates of gun violence largely tied to gang conflict. Given its reputation, this Facebook post implies that the virus is ultimately saving lives because people are inside and not on the streets.</p>\n\n<p>The poster did not respond to a request for comment.</p>\n\n<p>According to the Chicago Police Department, the city saw 24 homicides in March, a decrease from 35 in March of last year. But shootings and shooting victims for the month jumped roughly 6% and 5%, respectively.</p>\n\n<p>The department declined to say whether it attributes the decrease in homicides to COVID-19.</p>\n\n<p><a href=\"http://www.chicagotribune.com/coronavirus/ct-coronavirus-chicago-police-new-crime-stats-20200331-utnr2apdtbdzhagsehlzvq4lvi-story.html\">According to the Chicago Tribune</a>, Mayor Lori Lightfoot has been hesitant to draw a line between the virus and crime.</p>\n\n<p>&quot;We can&rsquo;t specifically say that the crime rate is affected by coronavirus,&quot; Lightfoot said. &quot;But obviously what we know going back many, many years and looking at data is that when large congregations of people are outside in neighborhoods where gun violence is prevalent, that increases the risk.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>A footnote: In Milwaukee &mdash; another city plagued by gun violence &mdash; there were more homicides in March 2020 than March 2019, <a href=\"https://projects.jsonline.com/apps/Milwaukee-Homicide-Database/\">according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel&rsquo;s homicide tracker</a>.</p>\n\n<div class=\"pf_subheadline\">Our ruling</div>\n\n<p>A Facebook post shared by more than 2,000 people claimed that in Chicago, COVID-19 has lowered the death rate.</p>\n\n<p>But numbers from the Cook County Medical Examiner do not indicate that deaths in Chicago decreased in March as COVID-19 started to ravage Illinois. In fact, the data suggest the opposite &mdash; more deaths, despite a decrease in murders reported by Chicago police.</p>\n\n<p>We rate the claim False.</p>\n\n<div class=\"artembed\">See Figure 1 on PolitiFact.com</div>",
            "sources": "<p><a href=\"https://www.dph.illinois.gov/topics-services/diseases-and-conditions/diseases-a-z-list/coronavirus\">Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), Illinois Department of Public Health, accessed April 1, 2020.</a></p>\n\n<p><a href=\"https://datacatalog.cookcountyil.gov/Public-Safety/Medical-Examiner-Case-Archive/cjeq-bs86\">Medical Examiner Case Archive, Cook County Government, accesses April 1, 2020.</a></p>\n\n<p><a href=\"http://www.dph.illinois.gov/news/city-chicago-announces-first-local-patient-travel-related-case-2019-novel-coronavirus\">City of Chicago Announces First Local Patient with Travel-Related Case of 2019-Novel Coronavirus, Illinois Department of Public Health, Jan. 24, 2020.</a></p>\n\n<p><a href=\"http://www.dph.illinois.gov/news/public-health-officials-announce-first-illinois-coronavirus-disease-death\">Public Health Officials Announce First Illinois Coronavirus Disease Death, Illinois Department of Public Health, March 17, 2020.</a></p>\n\n<p>Interview with Natalia Derevyanny, director of communications for the Cook County Bureau of Administration, March 31, 2020.</p>\n\n<p>CPD announces reduction in overall crime for March as department continues crime prevention efforts amid COVID-19, Chicago Police Department news release, April 1, 2020.</p>\n\n<p><a href=\"http://www.chicagotribune.com/coronavirus/ct-coronavirus-chicago-police-new-crime-stats-20200331-utnr2apdtbdzhagsehlzvq4lvi-story.html\">Newest stats show continued crime drop in Chicago during COVID-19 emergency, Chicago Tribune, March 31, 2020</a></p>\n\n<p>Email from Sgt. Rocco Alioto, Chicago Police Department, April 1, 2020.</p>\n\n<p><a href=\"https://projects.jsonline.com/apps/Milwaukee-Homicide-Database/\">Milwaukee Homicide Database, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, accessed April 2, 2020.</a></p>\n\n<p>Email from Natalia Derevyanny, director of communications for the Cook County Bureau of Administration, April 2, 2020.</p>"
        },
        {
            "id": 18276,
            "slug": "dont-let-facebook-post-scare-you-hand-sanitizer-fl",
            "speaker": {
                "slug": "facebook-posts",
                "full_name": "Facebook posts",
                "first_name": "",
                "last_name": "Facebook posts"
            },
            "targets": [],
            "statement": "“This lady here applied sanitizer to her hands/forearms &amp; went to the kitchen to cook. The moment she turned on the gas stove, her hands caught fire due to the alcohol contained in the sanitizer.”",
            "ruling_slug": "false",
            "publication_date": "2020-04-03T11:51:32-04:00",
            "ruling_comments": "<p>Public health officials say one of the best ways to avoid catching the coronavirus is to wash your hands with soap and water or, when that&rsquo;s not an option, rub them with hand sanitizer.</p>\n\n<p>But some Facebook users are sharing posts saying hand sanitizer can be dangerous.</p>\n\n<p>&quot;This lady here applied sanitizer to her hands/forearms &amp; went to the kitchen to cook,&quot; said a <a href=\"https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=2652107768355189&amp;set=a.1485300331702611&amp;type=3&amp;theater\">March 23 Facebook post</a> showing the arms of a burn victim. &quot;The moment she turned on the gas stove, her hands caught fire due to the alcohol contained in the sanitizer.&quot;&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>&quot;Y&#39;all please be careful!&quot; the post warned.</p>\n\n<p>The post was flagged as part of Facebook&rsquo;s efforts to combat false news and misinformation on its News Feed. (Read more about our <a href=\"https://www.facebook.com/help/1952307158131536?helpref=related\">partnership with Facebook</a>.)&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p><em><strong>RELATED: <a href=\"https://www.politifact.com/factchecks/2020/mar/03/facebook-posts/hand-sanitizer-can-be-used-prevent-coronavirus-inf/\">Hand sanitizer can be used to prevent coronavirus infection</a></strong></em></p>\n\n<p>We found no credible news reports detailing the incident in question, which <a href=\"https://www.indiatoday.in/fact-check/story/fact-check-viral-sanitiser-burn-1659085-2020-03-24\">fact-checkers</a> in India said was a hoax. Medical experts told us that while hand sanitizer is flammable, the fire risks largely disappear when the sanitizer is applied properly and given time to dry.</p>\n\n<div class=\"pf_subheadline\">Did a woman get burned because of her hand sanitizer?</div>\n\n<p>We can&rsquo;t say for sure that the Facebook post doesn&rsquo;t show a woman whose arms were burned from a hand sanitizer-induced flame. The post has the ingredients of a hoax, however.</p>\n\n<p>For starters, we were unable to identify the original source of the photo through reverse image searches on Google, TinEye and Yandex. Our searches on Google and Nexis for related news reports also turned up no results, whereas <a href=\"https://nypost.com/2020/03/11/woman-allegedly-turns-bottle-of-hand-sanitizer-into-molotov-cocktail-sparks-fatal-blaze/\">other</a> <a href=\"https://in.news.yahoo.com/hand-sanitizers-highly-inflammable-dont-124231909.html\">sanitizer mishaps</a> have been <a href=\"https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/11/us/7-eleven-new-jersey-sanitizer-burn-trnd/index.html\">widely covered</a>.</p>\n\n<p><a href=\"https://www.indiatoday.in/fact-check/story/fact-check-viral-sanitiser-burn-1659085-2020-03-24\">Fact-checkers</a> in India and <a href=\"https://www.techarp.com/science/hand-sanitiser-alcohol-fire-hoax/\">online bloggers</a> suggested the wounds in the photo were the result of skin grafting, a surgical procedure in which healthy skin is transplanted onto a new part of the body.</p>\n\n<p>But Andrew Vardanian, assistant clinical professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at UCLA and a plastic surgeon at UCLA Health, told us the image looked to him like a second-degree burn &mdash; and likely not one that came from hand sanitizer.</p>\n\n<p>&quot;The straight line on the left arm is too straight for this to have happened from hand sanitizer, he said. &quot;It is more consistent with a submersion type burn into something that caused a scald.&quot;</p>\n\n<div class=\"pf_subheadline\">Hand sanitizer is flammable, but proper use lowers the risk</div>\n\n<p>Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are flammable, which is why the <a href=\"https://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/firesafety/index.html\">Centers for Disease Prevention and Control</a>, the <a href=\"https://www.who.int/gpsc/tools/faqs/abhr2/en/\">World Health Organization</a> and <a href=\"http://sds.staples.com/msds/320863.pdf\">major manufacturers</a> like <a href=\"https://images.salsify.com/image/upload/s--JWPwiMEe--/dufxr1l3oqhdvmqchcog.pdf\">Purell</a> all offer fire safety warnings for use. Travelers <a href=\"https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/whatcanibring/items/hand-sanitizers\">typically</a> can&rsquo;t carry large amounts on <a href=\"https://www.fire.tc.faa.gov/pdf/TN10-19.pdf\">planes</a>.</p>\n\n<p>But while bottles and dispensers of hand sanitizer are recommended to be stored away from flames, the <a href=\"https://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/firesafety/index.html\">CDC</a> and the <a href=\"https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/44102/9789241597906_eng.pdf;jsessionid=D50A762FABCFB1569406859669F8FAD4?sequence=1#page=143\">WHO</a> both say the incidence of fire from use is &quot;very low.&quot; A <a href=\"https://www.who.int/gpsc/tools/faqs/abhr2/en/\">WHO webpage</a> says that the benefits &quot;in terms of infection prevention far outweigh the fire risks.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>Proper application and use mitigates the fire risks, experts told us.</p>\n\n<p>&quot;The directions for alcohol based sanitizers often state to rub it into your hands until they are dry, which would reduce the fire risk because the flammable liquid and vapors would evaporate,&quot; said Jeffrey Gardner, associate professor of biological sciences at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. &quot;Once a person&rsquo;s hands are dry, the fire risk would dramatically decrease.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>&quot;If properly applied with hands rubbed together until the liquid evaporates, it shouldn&#39;t burst into flame,&quot; added Michael Gochfeld, professor emeritus of clinical research and occupational medicine at Rutgers University.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>It takes about 20 seconds of rubbing for hand sanitizer to fully dry on your hands, according to <a href=\"https://www.cdc.gov/handwashing/pdf/hand-sanitizer-factsheet.pdf\">the CDC </a>and <a href=\"https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/44102/9789241597906_eng.pdf;jsessionid=D50A762FABCFB1569406859669F8FAD4?sequence=1#page=163\">the WHO</a>.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>Vardanian said surgeons often use flammable products to sterilize the skin before surgery, but he said &quot;we wait for a few minutes until we start draping to prevent these types of injuries.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>&quot;If someone used massive amounts of hand sanitizer and then contacted a flame, there may be a fire and a burn can result from this,&quot; he said of the Facebook post. &quot;This would, however, be very rare as most of the sanitizer would evaporate before flame contact.&quot;</p>\n\n<div class=\"pf_subheadline\">Our ruling</div>\n\n<p>A Facebook post said: &quot;This lady here applied sanitizer to her hands/forearms &amp; went to the kitchen to cook. The moment she turned on the gas stove, her hands caught fire due to the alcohol contained in the sanitizer.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>We ran reverse image searches and checked news databases, and we found no credible evidence that the incident in question actually took place.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>Hand sanitizer is flammable, but medical experts told us that the fire risks are low because the alcohol in hand sanitizer evaporates quickly when the product is given enough time to dry.</p>\n\n<p>We rate this statement False.</p>",
            "sources": "<p>Facebook <a href=\"https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=2652107768355189&amp;set=a.1485300331702611&amp;type=3&amp;theater\">post</a>, March 23, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Various reverse image searches on Google, TinEye and Yandex, April 1, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Various searches on Google and Nexis, April 1, 2020</p>\n\n<p>U.S. Food and Drug Administration, <a href=\"https://www.fda.gov/consumers/consumer-updates/safely-using-hand-sanitizer\">&quot;Safely Using Hand Sanitizer,&quot;</a> accessed April 1, 2020</p>\n\n<p>U.S. Food and Drug Administration, <a href=\"https://www.fda.gov/drugs/information-drug-class/qa-consumers-hand-sanitizers-and-covid-19\">&quot;Q&amp;A for Consumers: Hand Sanitizers and COVID-19,&quot;</a> accessed April 1, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, <a href=\"https://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/firesafety/index.html\">&quot;Fire Safety and Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizer (ABHS),&quot;</a> accessed April 1, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, <a href=\"https://www.cdc.gov/handwashing/pdf/hand-sanitizer-factsheet.pdf\">&quot;Handwashing and Hand Sanitizer Use at Home, at Play, and Out and About,&quot;</a> accessed April 1, 2020</p>\n\n<p>The World Health Organization, <a href=\"https://www.who.int/gpsc/tools/faqs/abhr2/en/\">&quot;Alcohol-Based Handrub Risks/Hazards,&quot;</a> accessed April 1, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Safety Data Sheet, <a href=\"http://sds.staples.com/msds/320863.pdf\">&quot;PURELL&reg; Advanced Hand Sanitizer Refreshing Gel,&quot;</a> Feb. 10, 2015</p>\n\n<p>Safety Data Sheet, <a href=\"https://images.salsify.com/image/upload/s--JWPwiMEe--/dufxr1l3oqhdvmqchcog.pdf\">&quot;PURELL&reg; Advanced Hand Sanitizer Gel,&quot;</a> Feb. 10, 2015</p>\n\n<p>Federal Aviation Administration, <a href=\"https://www.fire.tc.faa.gov/pdf/TN10-19.pdf\">&quot;Flammability Test of Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizer,&quot;</a> August 2010</p>\n\n<p>The World Health Organization, <a href=\"https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/44102/9789241597906_eng.pdf;jsessionid=D50A762FABCFB1569406859669F8FAD4?sequence=1#page=143\">&quot;WHO Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care,&quot;</a> 2009</p>\n\n<p>ANI on <a href=\"https://twitter.com/ANI/status/1244593511141232642\">Twitter</a>, March 30, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Yahoo News, <a href=\"https://in.news.yahoo.com/hand-sanitizers-highly-inflammable-dont-124231909.html\">&quot;Hand Sanitizers Highly Inflammable, Don&#39;t Use Near Fire, Advises Doctor as Man Admitted With Burn Injuries After Using Alcohol-Based Liquid Near Cooking Gas,&quot;</a> March 30, 2020</p>\n\n<p>The Statesman, <a href=\"https://www.thestatesman.com/india/man-suffers-burns-in-haryana-doctors-say-use-alcohol-based-sanitizer-wisely-1502871789.html\">&quot;Man suffers burns in Haryana; doctors say use alcohol-based sanitizer wisely,&quot;</a> March 30, 2020</p>\n\n<p>India Today, <a href=\"https://www.indiatoday.in/fact-check/story/fact-check-viral-sanitiser-burn-1659085-2020-03-24\">&quot;Fact Check: Do you risk burning your hands after applying sanitisers?&quot;</a> March 24, 2020</p>\n\n<p>The New York Post, <a href=\"https://nypost.com/2020/03/11/woman-allegedly-turns-bottle-of-hand-sanitizer-into-molotov-cocktail-sparks-fatal-blaze/\">&quot;Woman allegedly turns bottle of hand sanitizer into Molotov cocktail, sparks fatal blaze,&quot;</a> March 11, 2020</p>\n\n<p>CNN, <a href=\"https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/11/us/7-eleven-new-jersey-sanitizer-burn-trnd/index.html\">&quot;Police seize likely homemade sanitizer from a 7-Eleven after a young boy was allegedly burned by it,&quot;</a> March 11, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Snopes, <a href=\"https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/safety-moment/\">&quot;Purell Hand Sanitizer Warning,&quot;</a> Jan. 25, 2007</p>\n\n<p>PolitiFact, <a href=\"https://www.politifact.com/factchecks/2020/mar/03/facebook-posts/hand-sanitizer-can-be-used-prevent-coronavirus-inf/\">&quot;Hand sanitizer can be used to prevent coronavirus infection,&quot;</a> March 3, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Email interview with <a href=\"https://biology.umbc.edu/directory/faculty/person/LD60091/\">Jeffrey Gardner</a>, associate professor of biological sciences at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, April 1, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Email interview with <a href=\"https://www.uclahealth.org/andrew-vardanian\">Andrew Vardanian</a>, assistant clinical professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at UCLA and a plastic surgeon at UCLA Health, April 1, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Email interview with <a href=\"https://eohsi.rutgers.edu/eohsi-directory/name/michael-gochfeld/\">Michael Gochfeld</a>, professor emeritus of clinical research and occupational medicine at Rutgers University, April 2, 2020</p>"
        },
        {
            "id": 18272,
            "slug": "are-covid-19-travel-restrictions-more-critical-sav",
            "speaker": {
                "slug": "jesse-watters",
                "full_name": "Jesse Watters",
                "first_name": "Jesse",
                "last_name": "Watters"
            },
            "targets": [],
            "statement": "“We were slow with the testing, but very quick with the travel ban. And that's been much more critical in saving lives.”",
            "ruling_slug": "false",
            "publication_date": "2020-04-03T11:23:45-04:00",
            "ruling_comments": "<p>Defending President Donald Trump&rsquo;s coronavirus response, Fox News commentator Jesse Watters highlighted federal efforts to restrict international travelers who may be infected &ndash; a ban he claimed mattered more than diagnostic testing.</p>\n\n<p>&quot;We were slow with the testing, but very quick with the travel ban. And that&#39;s been much more critical in saving lives,&quot; Watters said in a March 31 episode of &quot;The Five&quot; on the Fox News Channel.</p>\n\n<p>The administration has attracted stinging criticism from public health experts and state officials, who say the dearth of COVID-19 tests has made it impossible to get a handle on the disease&rsquo;s spread. But the impact of the restrictions Trump had imposed &ndash; both on people traveling from China and, by March, from Europe and the United Kingdom &ndash; is another story.</p>\n\n<p>So we decided to dig in. We contacted Fox News to find out the evidence on which Watters based his comment but did not hear back.</p>\n\n<p>Early on, those restrictions won plaudits. After the March restrictions, Dr. Anthony Fauci, who heads the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and is a member of the White House coronavirus task force,<a href=\"https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/government-response-coronavirus-fauci-backs-trump-travel-ban/story?id=69557417\"> said there was</a> &quot;compelling evidence&quot; to justify restricting travel from those high-infection areas.</p>\n\n<p>But the implementation is another story. Global health specialists told us there is little to no evidence that Trump&rsquo;s restrictions have restrained&nbsp; COVID-19 &ndash; they came too late and didn&rsquo;t have the follow-up necessary to make a real dent. By contrast, they said, better and earlier testing could have saved countless lives.</p>\n\n<div class=\"pf_subheadline\">The wrong approach at the wrong time</div>\n\n<p>Targeted, quick travel restrictions can be part of the public health arsenal to control the spread of an illness such as COVID-19.</p>\n\n<p>The idea is to stop people in hot spots from carrying the virus to uninfected areas. The restrictions also tamp down on the risk that an infected traveler will expose others in the closed quarters of an airport, airplane or other mode of transportation.</p>\n\n<p>But the experts we spoke to made clear that these restrictions can work only as one (smaller) part of a comprehensive strategy. Without other aggressive public health measures, they would have little value. The timing of American restrictions &ndash; and how they interacted with other domestic efforts &ndash; rendered them ineffective.</p>\n\n<p>The administration&rsquo;s first coronavirus-related travel restrictions took effect Feb. 2, targeting non-citizens who had recently traveled to or from China. On Feb. 29, it took similar steps with people who had traveled to or from Iran.</p>\n\n<p>For context, the incidence of a severe respiratory illness began to emerge in China late last year. These cases were confirmed to be a novel coronavirus by Jan. 7, and the first American case<a href=\"https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2001191\"> was reported Jan. 20</a> &ndash; almost two weeks before any travel restrictions were in effect.</p>\n\n<p>Expanded travel restrictions took effect March<a href=\"https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/12/world/europe/europe-coronavirus-travel-ban.html\"> 13</a> and<a href=\"https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-51891662\"> 16</a> to include people in Europe, including the United Kingdom and Ireland.</p>\n\n<p>Experts told us those measures represented the wrong approach at the wrong time.</p>\n\n<p>&quot;When the travel ban was put in place, the risk of importation from China was quite small,&quot; said William Hanage, an associate professor of epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.</p>\n\n<p>For one thing, China had also put in place its own limitations on travel &ndash; limiting travel to and from Wuhan starting Jan. 23. And, by then, there were already several cases of coronavirus across both the United States and in other countries that had not been targeted by restrictions.</p>\n\n<p>And while European cases shot up in early March &ndash; particularly in Italy &ndash; even those travel restrictions were misplaced, he said. At that point, Americans already faced a domestic threat from the virus.</p>\n\n<p>So was the administration &quot;very quick&quot; with a travel ban? Not really.</p>\n\n<p>If anything, the travel limitations gave people &quot;a false sense that something with a big impact was being done,&quot; said Jennifer Kates, a vice president and global health expert at the Kaiser Family Foundation. (Kaiser Health News is an editorially independent program of the foundation.)</p>\n\n<p>That false security, others said, distracted from the reality that more essential precautions weren&rsquo;t in place.</p>\n\n<div class=\"pf_subheadline\">Limited effectiveness without widespread testing</div>\n\n<p>Well-implemented travel restrictions can buy time on the margins, research suggests. But that time has to be used effectively &ndash; to ramp up emergency preparedness and bolster activities like testing and isolating people who may have been exposed.</p>\n\n<p>And there&rsquo;s no way to know if the Trump administration&rsquo;s initial travel restriction &ndash; barring people who had been to China &ndash; reduced the spread of coronavirus.</p>\n\n<p>That&rsquo;s because the administration limited testing for the virus to people who were sick enough to be hospitalized or who had been to Wuhan specifically. Those are people with a heightened risk of exposure, and not representative of the broader swath of people affected by the travel limitations, said Jennifer Nuzzo, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security.</p>\n\n<p>&quot;Had we expanded testing during this time and still found few cases I would be more convinced that the travel ban had an impact. But we didn&rsquo;t.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>Available research on travel bans isn&rsquo;t promising, either.</p>\n\n<p>A March 20 analysis run by<a href=\"https://www.thinkglobalhealth.org/article/tracking-coronavirus-countries-and-without-travel-bans\"> Think Global Health</a>, a project of the Council on Foreign Relations, compared countries that did and didn&rsquo;t restrict travel with China. The researchers found no correlation between travel restrictions and preventing a pandemic outbreak.</p>\n\n<p>&quot;The combination of the travel restrictions within China and international travel restrictions against China may have delayed the spread of COVID-19, but more so in nations that used that time to reduce community spread of the virus,&quot; the researchers wrote.</p>\n\n<p>That last part is crucial &ndash; travel restrictions may have bought time, but that mattered only if countries actively fought domestic spread.</p>\n\n<p>Other research backs that up. A<a href=\"https://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2020/03/05/science.aba9757\"> paper published in Science</a> last month found that when China imposed its own travel restrictions, it made only a modest difference in curbing the spread of the coronavirus, both domestically and to other countries -- at most, buying a few days&rsquo; time. And, this paper also notes, travel restrictions were effective only when coupled with other efforts to halt transmission.</p>\n\n<p>By contrast, researchers were unanimous in noting the effectiveness of&nbsp; robust testing of people who may have been exposed -- and then isolating those who test positive for the virus. This test-and-quarantine approach has been proven effective in South Korea, which experienced its first case on the same day as in the U.S. but where the number of new COVID-19 cases is now on a dramatic decline.</p>\n\n<p>If you could pick only one strategy &ndash; travel bans or testing &ndash; the choice is clear, Nuzzo argued.</p>\n\n<p>&quot;We don&rsquo;t have any evidence that travel bans did much to stop or slow the spread,&quot; she said. &quot;Conversely, testing is essential. Had we been better able to find and isolate cases and traced their contacts, we could have kept case numbers down.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>The<a href=\"https://www.who.int/news-room/articles-detail/updated-who-recommendations-for-international-traffic-in-relation-to-covid-19-outbreak/\"> World Health Organization</a> makes a similar point: It says temporary restrictions are justified only in narrow circumstances and as a way to buy time. But that time, the organization says, must be used to &quot;rapidly implement effective preparedness measures&quot; &ndash; like testing.</p>\n\n<p>Another point that supports this position: the real-world experience unfolding in the United States.</p>\n\n<p>The &quot;travel ban didn&rsquo;t work,&quot; said Lawrence Gostin, a university professor at Georgetown Law, who specializes in global health law. &quot;This is self-evident, because the U.S. is now the global epicenter.&quot;</p>\n\n<div class=\"pf_subheadline\">Our ruling</div>\n\n<p>Arguing in support of the White House coronavirus response, Watters said the United States was &quot;very quick with the travel ban&quot; and that was &quot;much more critical in saving lives.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>This is incorrect. Travel restrictions could have bought a bit of time. But they were instituted after the coronavirus had already entered the United States.</p>\n\n<p>And the evidence at hand suggests that travel restrictions are most effective in combating viral spread if they are accompanied by targeted, robust testing and quarantining, which are the areas in which the administration stumbled. If you were to pick only one area to excel in &ndash; testing people for coronavirus or travel restrictions &ndash; experts told us that the research clearly supports testing, even without travel bans.</p>\n\n<p>Watters&rsquo; claim has no factual basis and misrepresents real-world evidence on multiple levels. We rate it False.</p>",
            "sources": "<p><a href=\"https://www.foxnews.com/transcript/gutfeld-on-the-media-and-the-virus\">Fox News&rsquo; &quot;The Five,&quot;</a> remarks by Jesse Watters, March 31, 2020.</p>\n\n<p>Email interview with Lawrence Gostin, law professor at Georgetown University, April 1, 2020.</p>\n\n<p>Email interview with William Hanage, associate professor of epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, April 1, 2020.</p>\n\n<p>Email interview with Jennifer Kates, senior vice president and director of Global Health &amp; HIV Policy at the Kaiser Family Foundation, April 1, 2020.</p>\n\n<p>Email interview with Jennifer Nuzzo, senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, April 1, 2020.</p>\n\n<p>Email interview with Jeffrey Shaman, professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University, April 1, 2020.</p>\n\n<p>New England Journal of Medicine, &quot;First Case of 2019 Novel Coronavirus in the United States,&quot; March 5, 2020.</p>\n\n<p><a href=\"https://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2020/03/05/science.aba9757\">Science</a>, &quot;The Effect of Travel Restrictions on the Spread of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak,&quot; March 6, 2020.</p>\n\n<p><a href=\"https://www.thinkglobalhealth.org/article/tracking-coronavirus-countries-and-without-travel-bans\">ThinkGlobalHealth</a>, &quot;Tracking Coronavirus in Countries With and Without Travel Bans,&quot; March 20, 2020.</p>\n\n<p><a href=\"https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/12/world/europe/trump-travel-ban-coronavirus.html\">The New York Times,</a> &quot;What You Need to Know About Trump&rsquo;s European Travel Ban,&quot; March 14, 2020.</p>\n\n<p>White House, &quot;Press Briefing by Members of the President&rsquo;s Coronavirus Task Force,&quot; Jan. 31, 2020.</p>\n\n<p><a href=\"https://www.who.int/news-room/articles-detail/updated-who-recommendations-for-international-traffic-in-relation-to-covid-19-outbreak/\">World Health Organization,</a> &quot;Updated WHO recommendations for international traffic in relation to COVID-19 outbreak,&quot; Feb. 29, 2020.</p>"
        },
        {
            "id": 18275,
            "slug": "no-us-isnt-developing-vaccine-or-antivirus-chip-tr",
            "speaker": {
                "slug": "facebook-posts",
                "full_name": "Facebook posts",
                "first_name": "",
                "last_name": "Facebook posts"
            },
            "targets": [],
            "statement": "Says the U.S. is developing an “antivirus” that includes a chip to track your movement.",
            "ruling_slug": "pants-fire",
            "publication_date": "2020-04-03T11:02:53-04:00",
            "ruling_comments": "<p>According to a theory circulating on the internet, the United States government will soon have an &quot;antivirus&quot; for the novel coronavirus that involves inserting a chip into your body to track your movements.</p>\n\n<p>That&#39;s news to us.</p>\n\n<p>We came across a <a href=\"https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=241424940365839&amp;set=a.114075076434160&amp;type=3&amp;theater\">lengthy Facebook post</a> that claims an &quot;RFID chip&quot; will be included in the antivirus, enabling the government to &quot;<em>watch your location, the speed your (sic) walking and even WHAT&rsquo;S IN YOUR BLOODSTREAM.</em>&quot;</p>\n\n<p>The post was flagged as part of Facebook&rsquo;s efforts to combat false news and misinformation on its News Feed. (Read more about<a href=\"https://www.facebook.com/help/1952307158131536?helpref=related\"> our partnership with Facebook</a>.)</p>\n\n<p>This is a hoax. There is no credible evidence that supports this theory. What&rsquo;s more, the term &quot;antivirus&quot; typically refers to software designed to detect and eliminate computer viruses &mdash; not a vaccine for the human body.</p>\n\n<p><strong><a href=\"https://www.politifact.com/article/2020/mar/12/7-ways-avoid-misinformation-during-coronavirus-pan/\"><em>Related</em>:</a><a href=\"https://www.politifact.com/article/2020/mar/12/7-ways-avoid-misinformation-during-coronavirus-pan/\"> 7 ways to avoid misinformation during the coronavirus pandemic</a></strong></p>\n\n<p>RFID refers to radio-frequency identification technology, which has been around in one form or another since the 1970s. It uses small chips that emit radio waves to identify people or objects, according to the <a href=\"https://www.dhs.gov/radio-frequency-identification-rfid-what-it\">Department of Homeland Security.</a></p>\n\n<p>Dr. Wilbur Chen, an infectious-disease scientist at the University of Maryland&rsquo;s Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health, said the idea of a vaccine containing RFID technology is preposterous.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>&quot;Even the smallest version of RFID chips are rather large such that none would ever fit into a vaccine needle &mdash; these are very small-bore needles,&quot; Dr. Chen told PolitiFact in an email, referring to the diameter of the needles. &quot;The RFID chips that are routinely used for the tracking of pets are as small as a grain of rice &hellip; or in other words, they are as large as a grain of rice, and no vaccine needles in use are that large in diameter.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>Mark Fenster, a law professor at the University of Florida who has written extensively about conspiracy theories, told us this type of hoax is typical of many theories rooted in otherwise legitimate concerns about privacy. It isn&rsquo;t surprising that the hoax has been adapted to the current outbreak and included in misinformation about the novel coronavirus, he said.</p>\n\n<p>Tracking technology has been deployed in the battle against the coronavirus. Singapore, China and South Korea <a href=\"https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/27/coronavirus-surveillance-used-by-governments-to-fight-pandemic-privacy-concerns.html\">have employed</a> a number of data-generating tools to help track movement, monitor quarantines and identify where infected people are, for example. Human-rights organizations say the ramped up surveillance comes with <a href=\"https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2020/03/19/privacy-coronavirus-phone-data/\">significant privacy concerns and ethical challenges</a> that the U.S. is still grappling with.</p>\n\n<p>But while there is ongoing discussion of how to use technology to help track virus spread, this &quot;antivirus&quot; implant notion remains very far afield from what is actually unfolding.&nbsp;</p>\n\n<p>&quot;The fear of insertion of tracking chips and other things like that into our bodies has been a longstanding bogeyman for theorists,&quot; Fenster said. &quot;There is a lot of tracking that goes on, but the suggestion that it&rsquo;s being used in this manner and this way seems absurd. This comes from the stream of conspiracy theories of the last 50 years. It has nothing to do with science and everything to do with conspiracy theories.&quot;</p>\n\n<p>Social media has been rife with falsehoods and hoaxes about the novel coronavirus, and the response to it. This is another one. Pants on Fire!</p>",
            "sources": "<p>Facebook <a href=\"https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=241424940365839&amp;set=a.114075076434160&amp;type=3\">post,</a> March 16, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Department of Homeland Security, <a href=\"https://www.dhs.gov/radio-frequency-identification-rfid-what-it\">Radio Frequency Identification (RFID): What is it?</a>, April 2, 2020</p>\n\n<p>CNBC, <a href=\"https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/27/coronavirus-surveillance-used-by-governments-to-fight-pandemic-privacy-concerns.html\">Use of surveillance to fight coronavirus raises concerns about government power after pandemic ends</a>, March 26, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Washington Post, <a href=\"https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2020/03/19/privacy-coronavirus-phone-data/\">Government efforts to track virus through phone location data complicated by privacy concerns</a>, March 19, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Phone interview, Mark Fenster law professor at the University of Florida, April 2, 2020</p>\n\n<p>Email interview, Dr. Wilbur Chen infectious disease expert at the Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health, April 2, 2020</p>"
        }
    ]
}