Emmarie Huetteman came to KHN from tThe New York Times, where she covered Congress with a focus on the House of Representatives and, most recently, the investigations into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. In 2015, she reported from the front lines of the nascent refugee crisis in Germany as part of the International Center for Journalists’ Arthur F. Burns Fellowship. A graduate of the University of Michigan, Emmarie also holds a master’s degree in public affairs reporting from Northwestern University’s Medill School, where she worked on an award-winning reporting project on the national security implications of climate change.

The latest Truth-O-Meter items from Emmarie Huetteman

Recent stories from Emmarie Huetteman

Health care stayed front and center at Democratic debate

The topic, which polls show is top of mind among voters, kept returning throughout the fourth debate of Democratic bpresidential candidates.

Fact-checking the Ohio Democratic presidential debate

Twelve presidential candidates assembled in Otterbein University in Westerville, Ohio, on Oct. 15 for the fourth and largest Democratic primary debate so far.

Despite repeated calls for unity, Democrats throw some debate punches on health plans

When it came to health plans, there were big ideas and big numbers, even though fewer candidates were on the stage.

Fact-checking the Democratic presidential debate in Houston

Democrats debated in Houston on the campus of Texas Southern University on Sept. 12, 2019. 

Biden-Harris debate rematch highlights health plan differences

The Wednesday night event marked the second night in a row for Democratic presidential hopefuls to stake claims on how to fix the health care system. 

Fact-checking the Democratic debate in Detroit, night two

The second crew of Democrats included Joe Biden and Kamala Harris, who had sparred in the first debate in Miami over school integration. 

In a messy Democratic presidential debate, facts about Medicare for All get tossed about

Candidates used their varying degrees on how to achieve universal coverage — whether through Medicare for All or more incremental steps — as a means to differentiate themselves from the field.