Jacobson

Louis Jacobson

Louis Jacobson has been with PolitiFact since 2009, currently as senior correspondent. He has served as deputy editor of Roll Call and as founding editor of its legislative wire service, CongressNow. Earlier, he spent more than a decade covering politics, policy and lobbying for National Journal magazine. Since 2002, he has handicapped political races, including state legislatures, governors, congressional seats, state attorneys general and the electoral college, currently for Governing. He is senior author of the 2016, 2018 and 2020 editions of The Almanac of American Politics and also contributed to the 2000 and 2004 editions. In 2004, Jacobson originated the “Out There” column on politics in the states, which ran in Roll Call and later in Stateline.org and which won five annual awards from Capitolbeat, the association of state capitol reporters and editors. He received the Weidenbaum Center Award for Evidence-Based Journalism from Washington University in St. Louis in 2014, and in 2017, the Society of American Business Editors and Writers gave him a Best in Business award for his economics coverage. He has been serving as an innovator in residence at West Virginia University's Reed College of Media since August 2018, teaching WVU students how to produce PolitiFact West Virginia.

The latest Truth-O-Meter items from Louis Jacobson

Recent stories from Louis Jacobson

What job could be next for the Democratic presidential candidates?

Running for president isn’t easy. And it’s especially tricky if you have to decide in the middle of the campaign whether it’s better to stay in or quit the race to run for another office.

The death of Michael Brown, legal facts and Democratic messaging

Two Democratic presidential candidates recently observed the fifth anniversary of Michael Brown’s death by police officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Mo. -- a case that sparked the Black Lives Matter movement as well as days of unrest locally.

Andrew Yang’s universal basic income proposal, explained

Andrew Yang says the next president needs to do almost the opposite of Donald Trump, and "the opposite of Donald Trump is an Asian man who likes math." Yang, a 44-year-old entrepreneur running for the Democratic nomination, also has a big idea that has become the central element of his campaign: giving every American $1,000 a month.

Fact-checking claims about the mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton

In the days since the mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton, we’ve heard a lot from people seeking to shape the gun debate with their own theories, facts and figures.  With so much going on, it might be hard to keep all of it straight. We recapped our fact-checking of politicians, pundits and social media here.

Donald Trump said he's done more for African Americans than any president. Historians disagree

President Donald Trump has often claimed credit for African-American economic success, such as touting the African-American unemployment rate on his watch. But amid swirling controversies over his tweets attacking Rep. Elijah Cummings and his heavily African-American district in Maryland, he took it to a new level during July 30 remarks to reporters at the White House.

Fact-checking the Democratic debate in Detroit, night two

The second crew of Democrats included Joe Biden and Kamala Harris, who had sparred in the first debate in Miami over school integration. 

The Democratic 2020 presidential field, by the numbers

As the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates prepare for their second round of debates, we decided to take a closer look at the 23-candidate field’s underlying demographics.

Did Ilhan Omar marry her brother? Her hometown newspaper investigated and told us what they found

For years, critics of Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., have raised questions about her marriages and made the explosive claim that she had married her brother. 

Fact-checking Trump’s misleading attacks on Omar, Ocasio-Cortez in North Carolina

In a North Carolina rally, President Donald Trump misled about statements by Ilhan Omar and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Does the U.S. women’s soccer team bring in more revenue but get paid less than the men?

The United States Women’s National Soccer Team recently won the Women’s World Cup for the fourth time. But the team’s compensation remains the subject of considerable controversy.