Jacobson

Louis Jacobson

Louis Jacobson has been with PolitiFact since 2009, currently as senior correspondent. He has served as deputy editor of Roll Call and as founding editor of its legislative wire service, CongressNow. Earlier, he spent more than a decade covering politics, policy and lobbying for National Journal magazine. Since 2002, he has handicapped political races, including state legislatures, governors, congressional seats, state attorneys general and the electoral college, currently for Governing. He is senior author of the 2016, 2018 and 2020 editions of The Almanac of American Politics and also contributed to the 2000 and 2004 editions. In 2004, Jacobson originated the “Out There” column on politics in the states, which ran in Roll Call and later in Stateline.org and which won five annual awards from Capitolbeat, the association of state capitol reporters and editors. He received the Weidenbaum Center Award for Evidence-Based Journalism from Washington University in St. Louis in 2014, and in 2017, the Society of American Business Editors and Writers gave him a Best in Business award for his economics coverage. He has been serving as an innovator in residence at West Virginia University's Reed College of Media since August 2018, teaching WVU students how to produce PolitiFact West Virginia.

The latest Truth-O-Meter items from Louis Jacobson

Recent stories from Louis Jacobson

Is there a homeless problem in Facebook's back yard, as Richard Ojeda said?

Richard Ojeda, a former West Virginia state senator who was briefly a Democratic presidential candidate, focused his message as a candidate on the fate of the working class and the sick. In a Jan. 8 tweet, Ojeda said that if you "go 1 mile from the headquarters of Facebook you will find a homeless shelter with a 70 person waiting list." We took a closer look.

Was the U.S. on the brink of war with North Korea before Trump? A review of the evidence

Was the United States on the verge of war against North Korea during the presidency of Barack Obama? Donald Trump has said he thinks so.

Fact-checking President Donald Trump’s claims about a national emergency

President Donald Trump announced his plan to declare a national emergency at the southwest border to secure funds for his border wall. Many aspects of his argument were misleading or wrong.

7 questions about the Green New Deal

You may have heard a lot recently about the "Green New Deal," championed by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and co-sponsored by more than 60 Democratic members of the U.S. House. But what’s it all about? Let’s take a closer look.

Why it feels like wages aren't outpacing inflation, even though they are

Democrats like to talk about struggling families who find wages aren’t keeping up with the cost of living. But our fact-checking has found that the economic data clashes with their argument.

Fact-checking the State of the Union for 2019

PolitiFact is fact-checking the State of the Union on Feb. 5, 2019. 

Trump disagrees with his own intelligence team. We catalog the differences

During testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee, several intelligence officials testified about security threats to the United States in a way that was sometimes at odds with what President Donald Trump has said. It didn’t take long for Trump to push back against them on Twitter.

Kamala Harris: Criminal justice reformer, or defender of the status quo? The record is mixed

Early in her run for president, Sen. Kamala Harris has crafted an image as a ‘progressive prosecutor,’ one who championed criminal justice reforms. But does her record as San Francisco district attorney and California attorney general match that image? PolitiFact California examined her past and found a mixed record of reform-minded achievements and places she wasn’t so progressive.

The upcoming Senate votes to end the shutdown: A closer look

A pair of votes are scheduled in the Senate for Jan. 24 -- either of which could end the partial government shutdown after nearly five weeks. But what are in these two measures -- one from the Republicans and the other from Democrats? And is there any likelihood of passage? Here’s a rundown.

Your questions about the government shutdown, answered (part 2)

We recently asked readers what they wanted to know about the government shutdown. In a previous installment, we tackled questions about missed work and pay for government employees. Here, we’ll address the legislative process and how the border wall proposal prompted the shutdown.