Jacobson

Louis Jacobson

Louis Jacobson has been with PolitiFact since 2009, currently as senior correspondent. He has served as deputy editor of Roll Call and as founding editor of its legislative wire service, CongressNow. Earlier, he spent more than a decade covering politics, policy and lobbying for National Journal magazine. Since 2002, he has handicapped political races, including state legislatures, governors, congressional seats, state attorneys general and the electoral college, currently for Governing. He is senior author of the 2016, 2018 and 2020 editions of The Almanac of American Politics and also contributed to the 2000 and 2004 editions. In 2004, Jacobson originated the “Out There” column on politics in the states, which ran in Roll Call and later in Stateline.org and which won five annual awards from Capitolbeat, the association of state capitol reporters and editors. He received the Weidenbaum Center Award for Evidence-Based Journalism from Washington University in St. Louis in 2014, and in 2017, the Society of American Business Editors and Writers gave him a Best in Business award for his economics coverage. He has been serving as an innovator in residence at West Virginia University's Reed College of Media since August 2018, teaching WVU students how to produce PolitiFact West Virginia.

The latest Truth-O-Meter items from Louis Jacobson

Recent stories from Louis Jacobson

Who is Pete Buttigieg? A bio of the Democratic presidential candidate

Unlike most presidential candidates in recent history, Pete Buttigieg has not served in Congress, as a governor or as a vice president. Rather, since 2012, he’s been the mayor of South Bend, Ind., a city of just under 102,000 people. Buttigieg has broken the mold in other ways, too: He’s just 37 years old, and he’s the first major openly gay presidential candidate. Yet his outlook is something of a throwback: Buttigieg has styled himself as a plainspoken, pragmatic candidate from the Midwest.

Who is Amy Klobuchar? A bio of the Democratic presidential candidate

Three times, Amy Klobuchar has won U.S. Senate elections by wide margins in the politically competitive state of Minnesota. She is running for the presidency in 2020 by positioning herself as ideologically and rhetorically more moderate than most other members of the large candidate field.

Who is Kamala Harris? A bio of the Democratic presidential candidate

Democratic Sen. Kamala Harris is relatively new on the national scene, but she's quickly become recognized for her tough questioning of Trump administration appointees. In her presidential campaign, she has emphasized teacher pay, enhancing health coverage, tightening gun laws, and pay equity.

What you need to know about executive privilege

Inaugurating yet another phase in the battle over Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s final report, the Trump White House on May 8 officially asserted executive privilege over the report’s unreleased and underlying materials. Let’s use this opportunity to take a closer look at what executive privilege is.

The record-setting 2020 Democratic primary field: What you need to know

The calendar may say 2019, but the 2020 Democratic primary is already in full swing. The party currently has 22 (soon expected to be 23) candidates officially running, with others possibly in the wings — a field that’s enormous by historical standards. Why is the field so big? What does it mean for the Democrats’ chances of winning the presidency? In this article, we’ll answer these questions and more.

A guide to possible paths to impeachment (or not) in the House

Democrats in Congress are debating how to respond to Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report, which cleared the Trump campaign of criminally conspiring with Russia, but also detailed President Donald Trump’s efforts to restrict and even shut down the probe.

Elizabeth Warren: Does her wealth tax pay for her child care and higher education plans?

People with net worth over $50 million would face Warren's wealth tax. She counts on the revenues to pay for her child care and higher education plans. We asked education and tax economists what might throw off her predictions. They had a few ideas.

Sarah Sanders and the history of press secretary falsehoods

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders told special counsel Robert Mueller’s team that she gave false information during a press briefing. Now, some are calling for her removal.

Fact-checking claims about abortion and the ‘born alive’ bill

Republicans and Democrats have made misleading claims about the "Born Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act."

The redacted Mueller report: The fight over what we won’t see

Attorney General William Barr is poised to release the findings from the special counsel’s nearly two-year investigation into whether the Trump campaign coordinated in Russia’s 2016 election meddling, and if the president obstructed the probe.