Valverde

Miriam Valverde is a contributing writer for PolitiFact. Previously, she reported for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel, the Bradenton Herald, the Boston Globe and a Boston Spanish-language publication, El Planeta. Miriam graduated from Emerson College with a major in journalism and minor in business studies.

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Recent stories from Miriam Valverde

8 times the Mueller report shows Trump, White House spread false or misleading claims

Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report provides a behind-the-scenes reconstruction of key events in the first months of Donald Trump’s presidency. The redacted version of the report, released April 18 by Attorney General William Barr, verifies and supports media reports about events that Trump dismissed as "fake news." And it highlights several instances where Trump aides told the press false information, including about the firing of former FBI director James Comey. Here’s an overview of some notable claims from Trump and his administration that turned out to be false.

In Context: Comparing Bill Barr’s summary of Mueller's findings to the publicly released report

U.S. Attorney General Bill Barr issued a four-page summary of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s key findings nearly a month before publicly releasing a nearly 400-page redacted version of Mueller’s report. Now that the report is public, here’s broader context surrounding the quotes that Barr included in his summary.

2020 Census citizenship question awaits Supreme Court review

Getting an accurate count of the U.S. population is a massive undertaking each decade. The 2020 Census is all the more complicated because of a national controversy tied to a single question that’s been elevated to the U.S. Supreme Court. Here’s an overview of why a citizenship question in the census is a controversial issue, how the proposed question for 2020 compares to the one in the census of 1950 (the last time all American households were posed a citizenship question), and the extent of the information provided by the Trump administration.

Fact-checking Donald Trump’s Grand Rapids rally after the Mueller probe

In his first rally since being cleared of criminally conspiring in Russia’s 2016 election interference, President Donald Trump in Grand Rapids, Mich., opined on everything from the end of the special counsel probe to immigration to health care.

Here’s what we know about the cost of the Mueller investigation

Special Counsel Robert Mueller ended his investigation on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential and whether the Trump campaign assisted those efforts— and he did not accuse President Donald Trump or his campaign of conspiring or coordinating with the Russian government. Given that outcome, Republicans are renewing attention on the cost of the investigation that went on for nearly two years.  Here’s what we know about the costs of Mueller's probe.

Fact-checking Donald Trump's two-hour speech at CPAC

President Donald Trump spoke to an enthusiastic audience at the Conservative Political Action Committee conference in Washington over the weekend. During his 2-hour-plus speech, Trump revisited many of the points from his political rallies.

Trump rests national emergency declaration on border ‘invasion.’ Here are the facts

President Donald Trump declared a national emergency in order to move forward with his campaign promise of building a border wall with Mexico. Trump said he expected to be sued over his declaration, even though declarations are often signed. National emergency declarations are signed relatively frequently by presidents, but Trump downplays the political implications of his move and the fact that many immigration experts and lawmakers question the existence of the crisis Trump says justifies his declaration.

Fact-checking President Donald Trump’s claims about a national emergency

President Donald Trump announced his plan to declare a national emergency at the southwest border to secure funds for his border wall. Many aspects of his argument were misleading or wrong.

Donald Trump vs. Beto O’Rourke on immigration messaging

President Donald Trump and former congressman Beto O’Rourke described the impact of immigrants and border walls in such starkly different terms that it sounded as if they were on different worlds. Yet they were rallying their supporters less than a mile away from each other. Here’s a rundown of what they said, in context.

Fact-checking the State of the Union for 2019

PolitiFact is fact-checking the State of the Union on Feb. 5, 2019.