The most recent articles on PolitiFact Georgia

Georgia’s 'exact match' law and the Abrams-Kemp governor's election, explained

The battle over pending voting registrations is playing out amid a close race for the governor’s office between an African-American woman, former State House leader Stacey Abrams, and a white man, Brian Kemp, the top official overseeing elections in the state.

Casey Cagle's tweet on Delta, the NRA and tax breaks. Is it legal?

Georgia Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle vowed to kill any legislation that would benefit Delta Air Lines if the Atlanta-based company did not backtrack on its decision to end an agreement with the National Rifle Association to remain "neutral" in the national debate over gun control.  Cagle’s statement was a promise of future action and political stance, so we are not rating it on the Truth-O-Meter. But we wanted to look into it after seeing  chatter wondering if it would be legal for Cagle to follow up on his threat.

What HHS Secretary Tom Price said about opioid addiction treatment

Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price raised an uproar after being quoted by a West Virginia newspaper as saying that a type of treatment for people addicted to opioids isn't very effective and suggesting there's a cure for addiction — despite research on the contrary.  

Trump's pick for health chief rides the Truth-O-Meter

Trump's pick for health chief, Georgia Congressman Tom Price of metro Atlanta, has long record of critical statements about Obamacare and federal debt.

Fact-checking the Republican debate in Miami

We fact-checked what the candidates had to say about trade, Common Core and more Thursday at the University of Miami.   Help PolitiFact raise $15,000 to hire an additional fact-checker for 2016   Fact-checking the Democratic debate in Miami   Fact-Check-A-Thon calls out misleading TV ads in 2016 primaries

Fact-checking the Democratic debate in Miami

Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders debated in Miami.    Help PolitiFact raise $15,000 to hire an additional fact-checker for 2016   Fact-Check-A-Thon calls out misleading TV ads in 2016 primaries

Live fact-checking the Republican New Hampshire presidential debate

The Republicans met face-to-face for the final time ahead of Tuesday's New Hampshire primary. See how their claims rate on the Truth-O-Meter.

PolitiFact on the road in Iowa

From Jan. 18-22, the PolitiFact staff will be on the road in Iowa fact-checking the presidential candidates first hand.

The 2015 Lie of the Year: the campaign misstatements of Donald Trump

A presidential candidate with an unprecedented record on the Truth-O-Meter earns PolitiFact's annual award.

Readying for final GOP debate of 2015

The top nine candidates for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination take to the stage Tuesday for the last debate of 2015. Before the contest airs at 8:30 p.m. on CNN, catch up here with the most recent-fact checks on candidate claims.

Donald Trump proposes banning Muslims from coming to the U.S. But that's not what Jimmy Carter did

Jimmy Carter's actions during the Iran hostage crisis have some significant differences with what Donald Trump is proposing.  

It's Election Day(s) for Lie of the Year

It’s that time again, to pick PolitiFact’s "winner" for Lie of the Year for 2015 and the coveted Readers' Choice award that counts your vote.

A primer on Trump before his second Georgia visit

Donald Trump returns to Georgia Monday, with a rally in Macon. PolitiFact Georgia is ready with fact-checks on claims from the GOP presidential contender.

About that big Thanksgiving meal ...

Just how hefty is the food on our tables this Thanksgiving - and some of the folks gathered there? Let PolitiFact serve up the answers.

Checking claims from the Democratic debate

Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton and Martin O'Malley squared off Saturday night in Iowa. See our latest fact-checks from the CBS Democratic presidential debate.

Democratic hopefuls back for second debate

The remaining three candidates for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination will appear in their second debate Saturday, just a week after the latest debate among the GOP contenders. Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and Martin O’Malley will take the stage in Iowa at 9 p.m., and the debate will air live on CBS and its radio affiliates. Click on the headline to see a sampling of fact-checks on those candidates.

Top fact-checks from the GOP debate in Milwaukee

We fact-check the candidates on claims about immigration, the minimum wage, income inequality, the Bible and the tax code. 

GOP hopefuls prepare for another debate

Eight candidates will share the stage for the next prime time GOP presidential debate. Get ready by seeing how they stand up in recent fact-checks.

Reagan fact-check still tops in Georgia

A nearly three-year old check about President Reagan’s support of an assault weapon’s ban was PolitiFact Georgia’s most-read post in October. Looks into the Georgia Bulldogs’ odds of beating Alabama and the Twitter of account of a "Congressman" from Georgia also fared well.  

Republicans return to debate stage

The top 10 candidates for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination will appear in their third debate Wednesday, just a week after the first Democratic debate further solidified former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton as that party's frontrunner. Two Republicans have withdrawn from the crowded field, which still requires an "undercard" debate of lower performing candidates at 6 p.m. The main debate will air live from Boulder, Colo. on CNBC starting at 8 p.m. Click on the headline for more on those candidates.  

The weird and wacky Truth-O-Meters of late

National politics and claims from Georgia leaders have been keeping PolitiFact busy, but not so busy our scribes couldn't look into some stranger claims connected to the Peach State lately.  

Democrats to take debate stage

The first official debate of the 2016 Democratic race for president airs in prime-time Tuesday night from Las Vegas. The debate, which airs live at 9 p.m. on CNN, features frontrunner Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, Lincoln Chafee, Martin O'Malley and Jim Webb. PolitiFact will live Tweet during the debates and share fact-checks we’ve done of the candidates’ past statements. Check them a sampling below.  

Trump holds rally in Atlanta on Saturday

Everywhere Donald Trump goes, people anxiously await his next soundbite. And he rarely disappoints. Trump travels to Atlanta on Saturday to host a noon rally at the North Atlanta Trade Center in Norcross. His visit comes after having his invite to a Red State meeting here in August rescinded because of a comment he made about a female debate moderator. Sometimes, his political enemies have tried to use his words against him. For instance, someone tweeted that Trump campaign hats with his "Make America Great Again" slogan were actually made in China. PolitiFact investigated and rated that attack Pants on Fire (Click headline to see more.)

A look at LGBT claims in Georgia

Gay rights issues - from marriage between same-sex couples to religious liberty proposals on the state level - have been in the news this year. As Atlanta prepares to celebrate the Pride Festival this weekend, we took the opportunity to take a look back at some of the statements and claims on those issues this year.  

Looking at local claims

Georgia political leaders and thinkers have made plenty of claims lately that have gotten lost in the din of presidential hopefuls. PolitiFact Georgia has paid attention, though, and checked out some of the statements from the Peach State. Read more on by clicking through on the headline.

Graham promoting himself as foreign policy expert

U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina may be the ultimate Washington insider in the Republican race for president — having spent more a third of his life in Congress. Graham, who was first elected to Congress in 1994, is hoping to build a broad base on one positive aspect of those years of experience: his command of foreign policy. But so far that’s not showing up in the polls. Graham’s statements have hit the Truth-O-Meter 12 times, earning two each True, Mostly True, Mostly False and False ratings and four Half True ratings. He had no statements with PolitiFact’s lowest rating Pants on Fire. Click the headline to see a sampling of those checks. 

Jindal tries for GOP nod from back of the pack

Eleven of the 17 candidates vying for the Republican nomination for president will be on the main stage at the second debate Wednesday. Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, trailing in the polls, won't be among them. As part of PolitiFact's ongoing series examining statesment from candidates on both sides of the aisle, today we look at claims made by Jindal, who will again appear in the "undercard" debate prior to the main event.

Fact checking Marco Rubio

As we near the the next national GOP debate on Sept. 16, political watchers are keeping an eye on polls to see who in the crowded field will make the stage for CNN's broadcast. As part of PolitiFact's ongoing series examining statesment from candidates on both sides of the aisle, today we look at claims from one of the standouts of the first debate in August, Marco Rubio, Florida's junior senator.    

Fiorina emerges from crowded GOP presidential field

The field for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination is so large, the first debate was split into two. Although the top 10 polling candidates drew the prime-time slot in the Aug. 6 events, former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina drew media and voter attention with her performance in the "Happy Hour" debate among the seven remaining candidates. Today, PolitiFact Georgia looks at our checks on claims made by Fiorina as part of our weekly series on White House wannabees from both sides of the political aisle. 

RedState Gathering drawing 10 GOP presidential hopefuls to Atlanta

Folks were still cleaning up the debate podiums in Cleveland when 10 Republican candidates for president were on their way to Atlanta. They will be in town for this weekend's RedState Gathering, a convention at the InterContinental Buckhead for conservative and party activists. The event will be lived streamed here if you want to watch. Expected candidates and speaking times are: Friday Aug. 7: 10:30 a.m. — New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie 11:30 a.m. — Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry 1:30 p.m. — Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal 3:30 p.m. — Former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina 4:30 p.m. — Florida Sen. Marco Rubio Saturday Aug. 8 9:00 a.m. — Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee 11:30 a.m. — Texas Sen. Ted Cruz 1:30 p.m. — Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush 4:30 p.m. — Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker Between 6:00 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. — developer Donald Trump speaks at the event's "tailgate" at the College Football Hall of Fame  

Sanders hitting same themes as years ago

As the race for the  2016 presidential nominations heats up, PolitiFact Georgia is taking time to remind readers of our fact-checks from the candidates. Each week, we alternate between the large Republican field and the relatively small Democratic offering. Today, we look at our checks on claims made by U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent who is making waves in the Democratic race.  

O'Malley on the trail but lagging

As the road to the 2016 presidential race heats up, PolitiFact Georgia is taking time to remind readers of our fact-checks from the candidates. Each week, we alternate between the large Republican field and the relatively sparse Democratic offering. Today, we look at our checks on claims made by former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, who trails in the Democratic race.

Trump makes provocative entry into 2016 presidential race

Real estate tycoon and reality television star Donald Trump carried his legendary reputation for making provocative remarks into his opening foray into the 2016 presidential campaign. Trump’s comments about illegal Mexican immigrants snagged the spotlight in the already crowded presidential contest and set off political fireworks. Three weeks later, Trump is still fending off criticism for saying Mexico is sending people with drug and criminal problems, even "some rapists," across the border into the United States. Millions of Americans know Trump from the reality television show "The Apprentice" and its catchphrase "You’re Fired." He’s also been in and out of the news for decades for his high-profile business ventures, his marital woes and romances, political jabs and trivia spats. Remember his persistence with the birther claim on President Barack Obama? The feud with Rosie O’Donnell? Some of Trump’s statements have crossed our path. We’ve fact-checked 20 statements, none of which we rated True. We rated two (9 percent) Mostly True, three (14 percent) Half True, 10 (45 percent) False and five (23 percent) Pants on Fire. Click the headline to read a sampling of our fact-checks, plus a brief bio.

A look at claims from Lincoln Chafee

PolitiFact Georgia has begun an occasional series looking at statements from more than a dozen of the 2016 presidential candidates as part of our overall effort to parse fact and fiction in the political talk. Today, we turn our attention to claims from former U.S. Senator and Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee. (See previous stories on other candidates here)

Fact checking Hillary Clinton

With more than a dozen candidates announced for the 2016 presidential election, there will be plenty of claims coming from all political corners. PolitiFact Georgia has begun an occasional series looking at statements from the candidates as part of our overall effort to parse fact and fiction in the political talk. Today: a look at the statements from former First Lady, U.S. Senator and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.  

Jeb joins the pack

ROAD TO 2016 The Jeb Bush file John Ellis "Jeb" Bush Age: 62, born Feb. 11, 1953 in Midland, Texas Political party: Republican Political experience: Served as Florida secretary of commerce, 1986-1988; ran unsuccessfully for governor of Florida, 1994; elected governor of Florida, 1998 and 2002 Education: Graduate of Phillips Academy in Andover, Mass., University of Texas with degree in Latin American affairs Business: Real estate development Family: Married to Columba Bush since 1974 and has three children, George P. Bush, Noelle Bush, John Ellis Bush Jr. Interesting factoid: parents are first lady and former President George H.W.. Bush and brother is former President George W. Bush. Fluent in Spanish.

PolitiFact at 5: True-rated fact-checks

What better way to close out our celebration of PolitiFact Georgia’s five-year anniversary than to look at claims that we researched and found were true. Just as the claims we’ve rated False or Pants On Fire point out when politicians got it wrong or played it fast and loose with the facts, the True-rated fact checks highlight when they did their homework and were right. That was the aim five years and more than 1,000 fact checks ago when The Atlanta Journal-Constitution launched PolitiFact Georgia, a unique journalistic attempt to parse political truth from political fiction. Summaries of a few of our True fact checks through the years are below. To comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own, go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). You can also follow us on Twitter through our Twitter handle @politifactga.  

PolitiFact Georgia at 5 shares some favorite claims

PolitiFact Georgia continues celebrating its fifth anniversary today by showcasing some head-turning claims we’ve fact-checked over the years from politicians, newsmakers and social media. Some of the hard-to-believe claims proved to be true, and those easy to accept were sometimes shown to be rather outlandish. But all of them provided interesting fodder for our fact-checkers. Summaries of a few of our favorites are below. To comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own, go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). You can also follow us on Twitter through our Twitter handle @politifactga.    

PolitiFact at 5 looks at some favorite Falses

PolitiFact Georgia is celebrating its fifth anniversary this week with a look today at claims that have ended up on the wrong end of the AJC Truth-O-Meter over the years. The Truth-O-Meter arrow struck False in these cases, even if the speaker didn’t always admit to an error. In other instances, we received the email or phone call that essentially said: Oops. My bad. I was wrong. Mea culpa. Summaries of a few of our favorite False rated statements through the years can be found below. To comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own, go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). You can also follow us on Twitter through our Twitter handle @politifactga.  

Clinton avoids media on Atlanta visit but regularly hits Truth-O-Meter

Hillary Clinton came to Atlanta on Thursday to raise campaign cash, but left without speaking to reporters. She has, however, spent some time on the PolitiFact Truth-O-Meter over the years. So we thought it would be a good time to review a few of those fact-checks on key issues broached by the former Secretary of State and Democratic candidate for president. Summaries of those fact-checks follow.

A look at local claims

With all the national doings, PolitiFact Georgia is shining the spotlight on some local and statewide claims.

Fact checking the new transportation law

Gov. Nathan Deal made filling potholes on Georgia's roads and fixing state bridges a step closer to reality by signing a sweeping transportation funding bill. The measure will raise about $1 billion a year - enough to tackle the state's mounting project backlog but not likely to make a dent in the overall need to keep all infrastructure up to date. PolitiFact Georgia kept tabs on the political struggle to get the bill passed, and has several fact checks to help explain what you can expect.

Same-sex marriage claims on the Truth-O-Meter

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday will hear arguments that could result in legalizing same-sex marriage across the country. At issue is whether the Constitution’s 14th Amendment, which guarantees due process and equal protection, compels states to recognize such unions and whether states such as Georgia, which now ban the practice, must recognize the marriages performed in other states. PolitiFact Georgia has prepared a primer on the claims, including the Peach State's role in the issue.

Getting schooled on education issues

Georgia's schools will continue to be in the news as Gov. Nathan Deal launches his bid for voters to approve the Opportunity School District with the power to take control of failing schools, convert them into charters or shut them down. The bill allowing for the overhaul was one of a handful of education-related initiatives to come out of the recent Legislative session. PolitiFact Georgia was there.

Revving up on claims about Mercedes' move

PolitiFact Georgia has taken the wheel before on claims about Mercedes-Benz USA's move to metro Atlanta. With the luxury automaker again in the headlines following the 2015 Legislative session, we revisit some of our fact checks on claims about the relocation and what it means for Georgia.  

About those claims from the General Assembly

The hallways under the Gold Dome are quiet now. But the 2015 Legislature session kept reporters and fact checkers alike busy during a 40-day session filled with truths, falsehoods and some claims that fell in between.  

Medical marijuana in Georgia

The legalization of a cannabis oil for certain medical conditions in Georgia is just a governor's signature away from reality. The two-year battle for medical marijuana has lent itself to several claims and counterclaims that PolitiFact Georgia checked as the debate wound its way under the Gold Dome.  

Finding the facts in Georgia's religious liberty debate

An ongoing debate over whether Georgia should adopt a religious liberty law is in its second year under the Gold Dome. The speculation and conjecture don't lend themselves to fact checks, but there are judicial facts that can help inform the discussion.  

Fact checking Georgia's bumpy road for transportation cash

At the forefront of the General Assembly session is a  tax proposal to raise at least $1 billion a year in new money for transportation fixes. As it stands now, House Bill 170 would end state sales taxes on gasoline and replace them with a state excise tax on fuel of 29.2 cents per gallon, but the debate continues. Here are some of our fact checks on the issue.

The facts, and fact checks, behind Patricia Arquette's Oscar speech

Actress Patricia Arquette accepted an Oscar for her work in "Boyhood" Sunday night and spoke out on an issue often raised in Georgia politics: The wage gap between men and women. PolitiFact Georgia has found that the rating for the claims vary as widely as the studies that confirm at least some divide,

All about education

Education - from its role in economic development to what to fund and how - remains a hot topic in Georgia. As state lawmakers begin the annual budget process with extra money for education for the first time in years, PolitiFact Georgia has already taken on some claims on the issue.

Drilling down on the state economy

The most recent exclusive Atlanta Journal-Constitution poll showed that the economy and jobs are the top issue on Georgians' minds for the third year in a row. The question of what state officials can, or should, do to boost employment will be a hot topic under the Gold Dome. Already, PolitiFact Georgia has looked at some claims on the issue.

Fact checks focused under the Gold Dome

PolitiFact Georgia will be keeping its eye on state lawmakers when they convene for the 153rd legislative session of the Georgia General Assembly. Check out some fact checks already published on top issues expected during the session.  

Our favorites that popped up in your newsfeed in 2014

It's not always a statement by a politician that spins the Truth-O-Meter into action. There are plenty of claims going viral via social media that drew the attention and scrutiny of PolitiFact Georgia in 2014. Below are some of our favorite memes of the year.  

How the claims stacked up in 2014

The scribes at PolitiFact Georgia are finishing up another year of fact checks. Here's a look at the year, by the numbers.

Truth be told, some newsmakers got it right

The fact-checking scribes at PolitiFact Georgia are often viewed as heartless Grinches, callously outing falsehoods by politicians and other powerbrokers. Truth be told -- and that’s our mission -- the folks we fact-check often turn out to be correct. So in the spirit of the season, as 2014 winds down, we look back at some of our favorite True ratings for the year. Want to to comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own? Just go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). You can also follow us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga). Abbreviated versions of our fact checks are below. Full versions can be found at www.politifact.com/georgia/.  

A sampling of Mostly True statements in 2014

There are times when a little additional context or clarification can add to the accuracy of a statement. PolitiFact calls those claims Mostly True. Below is a sampling of some of 2014's top Mostly True statements from Georgia politicians.

A look at the claims that scorched in 2014

It's roundup time at PolitiFact Georgia. We're kicking off our yearly review with a look at the claims in 2014 that, ahem, earned the distinction of Pants on Fire.

PolitiFact names its 2014 Lie of the Year

It is not an exaggeration to say more Americans have died from the flu this year than from Ebola. Yet misleading and ridiculous exaggerations about a virus that killed just two people in the United States last year stoked fear and confusion about the deadly disease. They said Ebola was easy to catch, that illegal immigrants may be carrying the virus across the southern border, that it was all part of a government or corporate conspiracy. They were wrong. That's why PolitiFact's 2014 Lie of the Year is a collection of myths and distortions about Ebola. For a closer look, read the full story here.      

Help us determine the Lie of The Year

It's a different kind of election season: time to cast your ballot in the Readers' Poll among the 10 finalists for Lie of the Year from PolitiFact and PunditFact.

Giving thanks for what's True

As we all sit down to Thanksgiving dinner and express appreciation for all we've have received this year, PolitiFact.Georgia says a special blessing for those times when the Truth-O-Meter spun True.  

Twelve key fact-checks on immigration and executive action

President Barack Obama has unveiled his plan to prevent deportations for a broad swath of people living in the United States illegally. We selected 12 key fact-checks to give readers the basics on immigration and executive action. 

A closer look at the Keystone pipeline

The controversial Keystone XL pipeline is scheduled for a vote in the U.S. Senate on Tuesday evening. Given the focus, and potential to drag on into the new year, PolitiFact Georgia took a closer look at some of the claims surrounding the project.

Deal and Perdue's goals for veterans

In honor of Veterans Day, we take note of the newly elected leaders' policy plans for former service members.  

A post-mortem on Georgia's midterm elections

Tuesday's midterm elections will have repercussions for months and years to come. PolitiFact Georgia takes a moment to look back at key issues in the two big races, for governor and U.S. Senate.

Time to vote, Georgia

It's Election Day in the Peach State. Before you head to the polls to cast your vote in some of the most closely battled and closely watched races in years, get a quick PolitiFact Georgia primer.

Fact-checking the flashpoints in the U.S. Senate race

Republican David Perdue's business record and Democrat Michelle's Nunn's ties to President Obama have become the most talked about claims in Georgia's effectively tied U.S. Senate race. We look at the facts behind the talking points.  

Debunking 10 scary claims for Halloween

A look at 10 recent political claims that sound pretty scary -- until you check the facts. 

Georgia's economy and the race for governor

Georgia's economy and how it spends or doesn't spend tax dollars have become hot rhetoric in the neck-and-neck governor’s race between incumbent Republican Nathan Deal and Democratic challenger Jason Carter.

Outsourcing issue heats up Georgia's close U.S. Senate race

The business records of Republican candidate David Perdue and Democratic candidate Michelle Nunn have drawn new attention in light of recent disclosures about Perdue's outsourcing experience.

Fact-checking Georgia's down ballot races

The close and closely watched political races for govenor and U.S. Senate are hardly the only contests voters will decide in Novbember. What about some of them?

Fact-checking Georgia's tight U.S. Senate race

The fight between Democrat Michelle Nunn and Republican David Perdue in Georgia's Senate race is intensifying. A recent exclusive Atlanta Journal-Constitution poll shows the race is so tight, it is within the margin of error. PolitiFact Georgia has followed the race closely for months. Several recent fact checks are below.

A new look for PolitiFact Georgia

Just in time for easier reads during campaign season, we give you a new design for our fact checks. (Want to see how easy? Check us out on your mobile device!) The Deal-O-Meter: Tracking the 2010 campaign promises of Gov. Nathan Deal Statements that earn the ruling Pants on Fire  

Examining the Israel angle to the Georgia governor's race

Nothing says state politics in Georgia like foreign policy issues, right? That's at least the case in the governor's race this year between incumbent Republican Nathan Deal and Democratic challenger Jason Carter. As the two candidates duel over education and the economy, the question of support for Israel has come up more than once. PolitiFact Georgia looks at one recent case - and explains why the complicated matter has surfaced.  

A closer look at Michelle Nunn

Which political party controls the U.S.. Senate could hinge on Georgia's battle for the seat being left open with Saxby Chambliss' retirement. Voters, and fact checkers, got a long look at GOP nominee David Perdue after the nine-week runoff campaign that ended last month. Democrat Michelle Nunn found herself in the spotlight shortly after that vote, with the accidental leak of a 144-page strategy memo from her campaign. Below are some of the fact checks connected to that memo and Nunn's bid for the seat.    

Local claims in the Truth-O-Meter spotlight

Fact-checks about tax savings and staffing cuts focus on decidedly local claims.

Getting schooled on education in governor's race

With Tuesday's runoff in the rearview mirror, election watchers now turn their attention to November. One of the most highly contested rates will be that of governor, with incumbent Republican Nathan Deal facing Jason Carter, a Democrat from Atlanta. PolitiFact Georgia is keeping close tabs on the close race. Already we have checked some claims in the race, especially on the key battleground issue of education.  

Fact-checking Georgia's U.S. Senate runoff

PolitiFact Georgia has kept a close eye on a statewide race capturing national attention, the GOP runoff for the U.S. Senate nomination. With the election between U.S. Rep. Jack Kingston and businessman David Perdue Tuesday, we've put some of the claims we couldn't resist fact-checking in one spot.

Fact-checks about FIFA and the World Cup

PolitiFact and PunditFact have been seized with World Cup fever, so we've directed our enthusiasm into a few fact-checks.

Tempest over a presidential text?

Says he just sent his first text message 

Fact-checking recent claims about climate change

As new studies shined a spotlight on rising sea levels and global warming, politicians and pundits made several statements we fact-checked.

Candidates take a ride on the Truth-O-Meter as May 20 primaries approach

PolitiFact Georgia is the non-partisan fact-checking operation of The Atlanta Journal Constitution, which attempts to parse political truth from political fiction. Our fact-checkers have been keeping a close eye on Georgia’s candidates for office as the May 20 Primary Election nears.

Top 10 most fact-checked people on the Truth-O-Meter

Curious about who -- other than President Barack Obama -- has been fact-checked on the Truth-O-Meter most often? We were, too. So we created a list.

On eve of the State of the Union address, a look at income inequality

Income inequality is an issue that PolitiFact has analyzed frequently since we started fact-checking political claims in 2007. So as President Barack Obama prepares to focus on income inequality in the State of the Union address, we thought it was a good time to review some of these claims, from both sides.

The 500 fact-checks of President Barack Obama

It was 2007 when a young senator from Illinois arrived on the national scene and launched a campaign for president. By coincidence, that’s the same year PolitiFact launched. We’ve been fact-checking the man who became President Barack Obama ever since. Recently we published our 500th fact-check on Obama.

Claims about MLK often go astray

In the four-plus decades since his death, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. has become, perhaps, the most quoted and misquoted figured in America. With today being King’s birthday, PolitiFact Georgia thought it would be timely to look at some claims concerning the Atlanta native and civil rights legend. Not surprisingly, many of these claims needed some context or were flat-out wrong. Here is a round-up on a few fact-checks involving King. Want to to comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own? Just go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). You can also follow us on Twitter on @politifactga.

Obamacare claims rarely get clean bill of health

If you wanted to ignite an argument in Georgia, and the rest of the nation, in 2013, you just had to say one word: Obamacare. The Affordable Care Act -- its official name -- became a lightning rod of controversy and a springboard for political pontificating. President Barack Obama’s assurance that if you like your health care plan you can keep it was named PolitiFact’s "Lie of the Year" by PolitiFact editors. PolitiFact readers also selected it as their "Lie of the Year" with 59 percent of the vote. It was a landslide. The next highest vote total went to Republican U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas for his contention that Congress is exempt from the health care law. But that only got 8 percent of the vote. Summaries of a few of our favorite Obamacare fact checks from 2013 can be found below. To comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own, go to our Facebook page  (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). You can also follow us on Twitter through our Twitter handle @politifactga. Full versions, including full coverage of the Lie of the Year, can be found at  www.politifact.com/georgia/.

Our scorecard of stadium fact-checks

The Atlanta Braves and Falcons were big news off the playing field in 2013. Both teams were victorious in their quests to win local approval to build new, high-priced sports facilities, but there was vigorous public debate and countless claims to sway metro Atlantans for or against the plans. PolitiFact Georgia tried to play referee throughout the year to determine the accuracy of some of these claims. Most of the statements had some truth in them, but there was typically some missing context. Below are some of our fact checks and findings. To comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own, go to our Facebook page  (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). You can also follow us on Twitter through our Twitter handle @politifactga. Full versions, including full coverage of the Lie of the Year, can be found at  www.politifact.com/georgia/.

Who knew? A round up of fact-checks that proved true

PolitiFact attempts to parse political truth from political fiction. We find plenty of fiction. But it’s important to remember that PolitiFact Georgia also discovers that politicians and power brokers sometimes hit the nail squarely on the head. PolitiFact Georgia published more than 240 fact checks in 2013,and 37 of those rated True on the AJC Truth-O-Meter. That compared with 26 that were rated False and 17 that earned our lowest designation, Pants On Fire. The remainder fell in the Mostly True, Half True and Mostly False categories. Today we look at our favorite fact checks of 2013 where the politicians got it right. To comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own, go to our Facebook page  (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). Full versions of the fact checks can be found at: www.politifact.com/georgia/. You can also find us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga) or @politifactga.

Oops! My statement was wrong.

Oops. My bad. I was wrong. Mea culpa. Over the course of 2013, PolitiFact Georgia has unearthed information that directly contradicts a claim we’ve attempted to fact-check. In some instances, the speaker has admitted the error of the original claim. PolitiFact Georgia decided to revisit some of our best fact checks in which someone, or an organization, corrected a statement when pressed by PolitiFact Georgia. Summaries of a few of our favorites of the year can be found below. To comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own, go to our Facebook page  (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). You can also follow us on Twitter through our Twitter handle @politifactga. Full versions, including full coverage of the Lie of the Year, can be found at:  www.politifact.com/georgia/.

A roundup of false comments that still burn

There’s not much worse  for the political class than a trip to the fiery regions courtesy of PolitiFact Georgia and the AJC Truth-O-Meter. This year PolitiFact Georgia published more than 240 fact checks. Of those, 17 had the distinction of being awarded a Pants On Fire rating. Not only were these statements judged to be untrue, but they were found to be ridiculously so. Here are summaries of a few of our favorite incendiary ratings of the year. Today’s roundup kicks off a weeklong review of some of the best of PolitiFact Georgia from 2013. To comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own, go to our Facebook page  (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). Full versions of the fact checks can be found at www.politifact.com/georgia/. You can also find us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga).

PolitiFact names its 2013 Lie of the Year

PolitiFact National has chosen the most significant falsehood of the year: President Barack Obama's repeated statement, "If you like your health care plan, you can keep it."

When Internet satire gets passed off as "truth"

Like the old game of telephone, satire is being transformed into "truth" by social media and the Internet.

‘If you like your health insurance, you can keep it’

Obama’s old comments come back to haunt him as the health care law enters a critical point of implementation. We review our key fact-checks on the issue.

Fact-checking attacks on Common Core school standards

PolitiFact affiliates, including those in Florida and Georgia, have looked at claims about Common Core, school standards that are being adopted by more than 40 states. Some of the attacks received a failing grade.

Ten questions about the debt ceiling

Confused about what the debt ceiling is? As the government hurtles toward a possible default, here is an FAQ by PolitiFact's national staff about the debt ceiling and why it's important to every American.

PolitiFact to launch PunditFact, checking pundits and media figures

PunditFact will be dedicated to fact-checking claims by pundits, columnists, bloggers and the hosts and guests of talk shows.

A fact-checker's nightmare: Shutdown shutters Census, BLS, other sites

One of the casualties of the federal government shutdown are statistical websites used by ordinary Americans ... and fact-checkers.

Fact-checking claims about Obamacare

The Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare, has triggered an avalanche of political rhetoric over the past few years. PolitiFact and PolitiFact Georgia have been keeping tabs on that complex debate, trying to parse truth from fiction.

Top 16 myths about the health care law

Because a Top 10 can't capture all the exaggerations.

Fact-checking claims about military strikes against Syria

As President Obama makes his case to Congress for an authorization of force, we've looked at claims about chemical weapons, mass casualties, refugees and red lines.

What the law and the past say about attacking Syria

As United Nations inspectors assess whether either side used chemical weapons in an attack that killed hundreds of people in Syria’s civil war, there is a heated debate in this country over President Barack Obama’s authority to use military force. PolitiFact revisits previous work about the legal and political framework regarding Syria.

Happy Birthday, PolitiFact! PolitiFact turns 6

We celebrate our birthday by looking at the most popular fact-checks, people and issues of the past year.

Who vacationed more, Bush or Obama?

Presidential vacations sometimes prompt criticism over cost and appearances, and President Barack Obama's current vacation is no exception. We look at the vacations of Obama and his predecessor, George W. Bush.

Catching up with campaign promises on the Obameter

We check in on President Obama’s campaign promises about Guantanamo Bay, same-sex marriage, education and clean energy.

Four familiar facts from Barack Obama’s speech

President Barack Obama invoked some familiar facts in support of his vision for the U.S. economy on Wednesday at Knox College.

Fact-checks about the case involving George Zimmerman

We've looked into several claims about Trayvon Martin's death in Sanford, Fla., and its aftermath.

Top five falsehoods of the immigration debate

From fence opt-out clauses to free phones for immigrants, PolitiFact has tracked rhetoric of the immigration debate. Here’s our collection of the top five falsehoods.

A look back at our climate-change fact-checks

As President Barack Obama unveils a series of planned executive actions on climate change, we recap some of our many fact-checks on the issue.

Fact-checking immigration

As the debate over immigration legislation continues, our fact-checks examine fertility, elections, the media and immigration history.

Barack Obama on surveillance, then and now

With the recent revelations about National Security Agency surveillance of phone and Internet traffic, some are wondering how much President Barack Obama has reversed course since he was a presidential candidate. So we took a look back.

PolitiFact Georgia celebrates three years of fact-checks

On our third birthday, PolitiFact Georgia looks back at some of the most memorable items, specifically those that have involved numbers.

Principles of PolitiFact

A couple of times a year, we publish this overview of our procedures and the principles for Truth-O-Meter rulings.

As the IRS sits in the hot seat, we check tax facts

We looked at two claims -- one by a Republican lawmaker, one by a Democratic lawmaker -- that go to the heart of whether the IRS is too fearsome, or not doing enough

Fact-checking claims about the attacks in Benghazi

The deaths of four Americans at a diplomatic outpost in Libya have fueled a war of words between Republicans in Congress and President Barack Obama. We compare the rhetoric with the facts.

The article: PolitiFact expands to Australia

The Truth-O-Meter is now down under. The launch of PolitiFact Australia marks our first international venture and a big step for the global fact-checking movement.

The Senate takes up immigration

Senators begin marking up proposed immigration legislation. We cut through what's true and what's not in the debate.

Fact-checking President Obama's press conference

President Obama spoke with reporters on the 100-day mark for his second term. We checked the facts.

Special report: Examining the state of gun research

Firearms research has been a battleground for advocacy groups for nearly 20 years, complicating fact-checking and making basic data on guns and gun violence hard to come by. The scarcity of gun research, though, may be coming to an end.

Is the U.S. letting terrorists slip through its fingers?

Is there a pattern of the U.S government looking into potential terrorists, finding nothing incriminating, and then discovering -- too late -- that they were terrorists after all?

Claims about guns often miss the target

We analyze our 130+ fact-checks about guns and find some interesting patterns and trends.

Checking in on President Barack Obama's campaign promises

We monitor the latest actions on elections, guns and foreign policy.

As the Supreme Court takes up same-sex marriage cases, here's a primer

The Defense of Marriage Act and California's Proposition 8 are under fire from supporters of marriage equality. This week, the Supreme Court will hear both cases.

A $1 billion deal

Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed and Atlanta Falcons owner Arthur Blank announced recently they’ve agreed to the financial framework of a $1 billion stadium to replace the 20-year-old Georgia Dome. The deal must still be approved by the 15-member Atlanta City Council.  

Fact-checking Rand Paul's fillibuster on drones

The 13-hour filibuster by the Kentucky senator and his allies focused attention on the Obama administration's policies on drone strikes. We check the facts.

Sequestration is here; we sort the facts

After Congress and the president couldn't work out a deal last week, automatic federal spending cuts were set to take effect on Friday. Before the sequestration deadline hit claims flew about what would happen when the bomb dropped. Now that the time has come, the claims have continued to roll in. PolitiFact examines some of them and sorts the facts.

PolitiFact's guide to sequestration

We sort out the blame game on the latest budget impasse in a special report.

What would George do?

On President's Day, PolitiFact explores our first president, George Washington. "Blow not on your broth at the table" and other lessons from the Founding Father, who would have turned 281 years old this week.

Fact-checking the State of the Union address

We've fact-checked statements from President Barack Obama's State of the Union address, as well as from the Republican reaction. We'll be posting more fact-checks as we finish them.

Can President Obama claim economic victory?

The economy is slowly recovering. Should President Barack Obama get credit for the gains, blame for the shortcomings -- or neither?    

A look at how Saxby Chambliss has done on the Truth-O-Meter

Saxby Chambliss, Georgia’s senior U.S. senator, surprised the political world Friday when he announced he’s not running for a third term in 2014, despite recent claims he was ready to take on any and all challengers. The decision has several politicians and officeholders considering whether to run for the seat. In the meantime, PolitiFact Georgia thought we’d look back at how Chambliss has fared on our Truth-O-Meter.

Fact-checking claims on guns and gun violence

When it comes to guns and gun violence, the rhetoric includes both fact and fiction.

Get the Truth-O-Meter in your inbox every week

Sign up for our weekly email newsletter. It's a great way to keep up with our fact-checking and promise-rating.

Fiscal cliff deal gets to heart of Obama’s tax promises

The deal reached in Washington to avoid overnight tax increases and spending cuts struck at the core of President Barack Obama's promises on taxes.

The Most Popular Fact-Checks of 2012

Readers voted with their eyeballs for our most popular fact-checks of the year.

PolitiFact's 2012 Truth-O-Meter stats

The year 2012 is fading faster than a Mayan end-of-the world prediction. So the scribes at the AJC Truth-O-Meter decided to take a look back at the year that was --- a year of more than 200 fact checks by your local team of truth-seekers, collectively known as PolitiFact Georgia.

Fact-checks on gun control and gun violence

The shooting in Newtown, Conn., that killed 26 people has reopened a national debate about gun control. As it unfolds, you might hear some familiar claims. Here's our roundup.

Lie of the Year: the Romney campaign's ad on Jeeps made in China

Romney's claim about Jeep moving production to China at the expense of American jobs was last-ditch effort to win the election, but it hit a roadblock: the facts.

Help us choose PolitiFact's Lie of the Year

We'll be choosing the Lie of the Year in the next few weeks. Send us your suggestions!

PolitiFact's guide to Thanksgiving dinner

At Thanksgiving dinner, there's probably a good chance you'll end up sitting beside your uncle. You love your uncle, but you could do without all those chain e-mails that he forwards to you, the ones that claim the government is forcing you to get rid of your light bulbs, that "Obamacare" is going to put a tax on home sales and that President Barack Obama fits the biblical description of the Antichrist. (Note to uncles: We're not really singling you out. Chain e-mails get forwarded by aunts, grandparents and plenty of other relatives.) So PolitiFact has put together this handy guide to chain e-mails and other viral messages. Hide it under the green bean casserole and you can pull it out if your uncle brings up the chain e-mails.

The value of fact-checking in the 2012 campaign

Critics harrumph that fact-checking doesn't work because politicians keep lying. But politicians aren't our audience. Voters are. PolitiFact details the work done by fact-checkers and the responses from voters. As always, complete versions of fact-checks are available at the PolitiFact online sites. To comment on our Truth-O-Meter rulings go to our Facebook page: www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia?fref=ts. Readers can follow us on Twitter @PolitiFactGA.

Election and voter ID claims get examined

Today ends a long -- and often annoying -- season of political ads, robocalls from famous politicians and glossy fliers sitting in your mailbox from someone who wants your vote. PolitiFact Georgia decided to take a look back at a few claims about voting and elections that have been tested on the Truth-O-Meter this election cycle. Below are abbreviated versions of these fact checks. Look for the complete versions at the PolitiFact online sites. Want to comment on our Truth-O-Meter rulings? It's easy. Just go to our Facebook page: www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia?fref=ts. Readers can follow us on Twitter at PolitiFactGA.

Has President Obama kept his campaign promises?

Four years ago, Barack Obama made an extraordinary number of campaign promises -- 508 -- on everything from taxes to whaling. We've been tracking each one and have rated them on our Obameter, a five-level scale from Stalled to Promise Kept. With the 2012 campaign winding down, we thought it was a good time for a status report.

Obama and Romney on jobs

One of the hottest topics of this presidential campaign has been jobs -- how many have been created and lost, and who has the best plans for restoring them. Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama have honed in on this key area and made several attempts to outshine the opposition. Below are abbreviated versions of fact checks about the candidates’ statements during the campaign. Look for the complete fact checks at the PolitiFact online sites. Want to  comment on our Truth-O-Meter rulings? It’s easy. Just go to our Facebook page:  www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia?fref=ts. Readers can follow us on Twitter at: PolitiFactGA.

Obama and Romney square off over international relations

By Jim Tharpe PolitiFact Georgia   The 2012 campaign between President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has produced some memorable statements on how both men view U.S. relations with other nations. Romney and Obama even had a debate devoted to international relations, even though they spent a good deal of that showdown talking about domestic issues. Below are abbreviated versions of some of our rulings about international relations from the campaign. Look for the complete fact checks at the PolitiFact online sites. Want to comment on our Truth-O-Meter rulings? It’s easy. Just go to our Facebook page:  www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia?fref=ts. Readers can follow us on Twitter at: PolitiFactGA.  

"Obamacare" gets examined on the Truth-O-Meter

The 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, often called Obamacare, has stirred plenty of emotions and truth-twisting by its supporters and critics. Below are some abbreviated versions of fact checks of statements about it by President Barack Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney during the campaign. Look for the complete fact checks at the PolitiFact online sites. Readers can comment on our Truth-O-Meter rulings at our Facebook page:  www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia?fref=ts.  And they can follow us on Twitter at: PolitiFactGA.

PolitiFact examines candidates claims on Medicare

The future of Medicare, the federal health care program for older and disabled Americans, has been a key issue in the race for the White House. The issue came into sharp focus after Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney named U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin as his running mate. In 2011, Ryan proposed a hotly debated plan to ensure Medicare remains solvent. President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden have consistently claimed the GOP approach would end Medicare guarantees for seniors. The Republicans have countered the Obama administration has cut Medicare spending through the controversial 2010 health care law. Below are some abbreviated versions of fact checks of statements by the candidates on the issue. Look for the complete fact checks at the PolitiFact online sites. Readers can comment on our Truth-O-Meter rulings at our Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia?fref=ts. And they can follow us on Twitter at: PolitiFactGA.

A campaign full of red-hot statements

By Jim Tharpe PolitiFact Georgia   In politics, there are truths. There are falsehoods. And there’s Pants on Fire. PolitiFact and the AJC Truth-O-Meter complete hundreds of fact checks every year. And a few fall into that fiery netherworld of the ridiculously misleading. The 2012 campaign between President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has produced some memorable misstatements. Below are abbreviated versions of some of the top Pants on Fire rulings of the campaign. Look for the complete fact checks at the PolitiFact online sites. Want to comment on our Truth-O-Meter rulings? It’s easy. Just go to our Facebook page:  www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia?fref=ts. Readers can follow us on Twitter at: PolitiFactGA.  

Obama and Romney on women's issues

Women are a key demographic of this presidential campaign. Both Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama have targeted this swing group, trying to sway female voters on issues such as contraception, equity pay and employment. The focus on females has produced some of the most memorable statements during the campaign from both men and their running mates, Vice President Joe Biden and vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan. Below are abbreviated versions of fact checks about the candidates’ statements during the campaign. Look for the complete fact checks at the PolitiFact online sites. Want to  comment on our Truth-O-Meter rulings? It’s easy. Just go to  our Facebook page:  www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia?fref=ts. Readers can follow us on Twitter at: PolitiFactGA.

Obama and Romney on taxes

Taxes have been a major focus of this presidential campaign. Both President Barack Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney have different ideas on the issue, and each has a specific tax plan. Democrats have criticized Romney’s plan as being vague and a potential burden on middle-income families. Republicans have complained that Obama’s tax policies will keep the country mired in an economic slump. Along the way, both men -- and their running mates, Vice President Joe Biden and vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan -- have kept the AJC Truth-O-Meter busy. Below are abbreviated versions of fact checks about the candidates’ statements during the campaign. Look for the complete fact checks at the PolitiFact online sites. Readers can comment on our Truth-O-Meter rulings at our Facebook page:  www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia?fref=ts.  And they can follow us on Twitter at: PolitiFactGA.

Obama and Romney on the economy

The economy has been the central issue in this presidential race. President Barack Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney have divergent visions about how to help create more jobs, sell more American goods overseas and make the nation more energy-independent. Along the way, both men have made claims that caused the Truth-O-Meter to sway in all directions. Below are some abbreviated versions of fact checks about the candidates’ statements during the campaign. Look for the complete fact checks at the PolitiFact online sites. Readers can comment on our Truth-O-Meter rulings at our Facebook page:  www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia?fref=ts.  And they can follow us on Twitter at: PolitiFactGA.  

Checking the facts on China

Both sides have used China as a villain in the 2012 campaign. We've put their claims to the Truth-O-Meter PolitiFact and PolitiFact Georgia are checking statements made by the presidential challengers, who have less than two weeks until Election Day. We will be updating our online site -- www.politifact.com/georgia/ -- as more fact checks are completed. Readers can comment on our Truth-O-Meter rulings at: www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia?fref=ts. They can follow us on Twitter at PolitiFactGA.

Fact checking the third presidential debate

President Barack Obama and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney wrapped up the presidential debate season Monday with a showdown in Florida. The topic: foreign policy. PolitiFact and PolitiFact Georgia are checking statements made by the challengers, who have less than two weeks until Election Day. We will be updating our online site -- www.politifact.com/georgia/ -- throughout the day as more fact checks are completed. Readers can comment on our Truth-O-Meter rulings at: www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia?fref=ts. They can follow us on Twitter at PolitiFactGA.  

Attack in Libya a hot topic for both candidates

We fact-check claims by Mitt Romney and Joe Biden about the fatal attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi. We will be updating our online site -- http://www.politifact.com/georgia/ -- continuously as fact-checks are completed. Readers can comment on our Truth-O-Meter rulings at our Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia?fref=ts. And they can follow on Twitter at: PolitiFactGA.

Another debate, a new round of fact-checks

The second presidential debate is in the books. A third and final face-to-face showdown between Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama is set for Monday. PolitiFact and PolitiFact Georgia checked statements made by the candidates during Tuesday’s town hall-style event. Below are some (abbreviated versions of) fact-checks on statements by the candidates or major themes they broached during their second debate. We will be updating our online site -- http://www.politifact.com/georgia/ -- continuously as fact-checks are completed. Readers can comment on our Truth-O-Meter rulings at our Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia?fref=ts. And they can follow on Twitter at: PolitiFactGA. Look for the complete fact-checks at the PolitiFact online sites.

Candidates mix it up in tense debate

PolitiFact and PolitiFact Georgia are checking statements made by Mitt Romney and President Obama during Tuesday’s debate. We will be updating our online site -- http://www.politifact.com/georgia/ -- throughout the day as fact-checks are completed. Readers can comment on our Truth-O-Meter rulings at our Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia?fref=ts. And they can follow on Twitter at: PolitiFactGA. Below are some initial (abbreviated versions of) fact-checks on actual statements by the candidates or major themes they broached during their second debate. Look for the complete fact-checks at the PolitiFact online sites.

Fact-checking taxes in the presidential race

What are the facts when it comes Barack Obama's and Mitt Romney's tax policies?

Fact-checking the vice presidential debate

The vice presidential debate Thursday night began on a somber note, then quickly turned to lively attacks — with both candidates stretching the truth. Moderator Martha Raddatz asked Vice President Joe Biden whether the assault that recently killed a U.S. ambassador in Libya represented a massive intelligence failure. Biden said it was a tragedy. Then he went after Rep. Paul Ryan's partner on the Republican presidential ticket, Gov. Mitt Romney. And the wrangling began, some of it truthful, much of it just partly so. Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan and al-Qaida Biden attacked Romney's past statements on foreign policy. President Barack Obama had promised to end the war in Iraq, Biden said, while "Romney said that was a tragic mistake, we should have left 30,000 troops there." It’s true that Romney characterized Obama’s 2011 deadline with the word "tragic." Romney did not say ending the war was tragic; he was talking about the speed at which Obama removed all troops. Romney’s preference was to leave a large residual force, and he has used an estimate of up to 30,000 in the past, as Biden said during the debate. We rated Biden’s claim Half True. Biden also claimed Romney said he "wouldn't move heaven and earth to get (Osama) bin Laden." We've rated a similar claim from an Obama ad, that Romney's view on killing bin Laden was "it's not worth moving heaven and earth." The Obama team was right that Romney used those words, but it's cherry-picking, glossing over comments describing his broader approach. Romney said he wanted to pursue all of al-Qaida, not just its leaders. We rated the claim Half True. Biden said that Obama would end the war in Afghanistan in 2014, but claimed that Romney said the United States shouldn't set a date, and with regard to 2014, "it depends." Ryan responded that Romney and Ryan agree with a 2014 deadline for U.S. withdrawal. There's some evidence for all of those claims. We checked a statement by Ryan in September that he and Romney have "always agreed" with the 2014 timetable. We found numerous instances where Romney expressed support for that deadline. His criticism was not of the date itself but the announcement of it, which he said emboldened the Taliban and endangered troops. But Romney also has said a troop withdrawal would be conditional on what the situation on the ground is -- an important caveat that could leave him room to ignore the deadline. (Or, as Biden said, "it depends.") Ryan’s previous statement was accurate but for that one detail. We rated it Mostly True. On Iran, Ryan described the impression he thought the ayatollahs would get about the U.S. relationship with ally Israel. Ryan claimed Obama was in New York City the same day as Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu but went on a TV show instead of meeting with him. The two leaders were not there on the same day: Obama was there Monday and Tuesday, and Netanyahu was there later in the week, on Thursday and Friday. Obama taped The View on Monday. We rated this claim False. Auto industry, home foreclosures and the stimulus Biden claimed that Romney wasn't committed to saving the auto industry. "He said, let it go bankrupt, period," Biden said. We checked a similar claim from Jennifer Granholm, former governor of Michigan, at the Democratic National Convention in September. She said that Romney's response to the crisis in the auto industry was, "Let Detroit go bankrupt." Romney did use the words about letting Detroit go bankrupt in a CBS TV interview, but his meaning was more nuanced and he emphasized that he was not referring to liquidation. We rated Granholm's statement Half True. Biden also claimed the Obama administration helped people refinanced their homes, while Romney said, "No, let foreclosures hit the bottom." A Democratic National Committee ad in 2011 said that Romney’s housing policy was, "Don’t try and stop the foreclosure process. Let it run its course and hit the bottom." That was part of his policy, but Democrats edited out his remarks that said the housing market should then turn around and come back up as investors buy properties and rent them out. Romney also said he was open to ideas for encouraging refinancing. Romney did seem to favor letting foreclosures run their course, but he also suggested that doing so would enable investors to buy low-priced homes and revive the market. We rated the DNC’s ad Half True. In an exchange about the effectiveness of Obama's stimulus, Ryan asked Biden whether it was "a good idea to spend taxpayer dollars on electric cars in Finland, or on windmills in China?"  An American car company, Fisker Automotive, got federal loan guarantees and later manufactured cars in Finland, but the federal support the company received wasn't funded by the stimulus. Meanwhile, the loans went toward engineering and design that happened in the United States. As for the windmills in China, it's true that a small number of windmills and components to build them came from China. But the statement greatly exaggerates China’s role in the overall use of stimulus money. We rated Ryan's statement Mostly False. Ryan said the Obama administration passed the stimulus with the idea that "unemployment would never get to 8 percent." Obama's Council of Economic Advisers created a chart predicting that the stimulus would keep the unemployment rate from going higher, but the accompanying report included heavy disclaimers that the projections had "significant margins of error" and a high degree of uncertainty due to a recession that is "unusual both in its fundamental causes and its severity." We rated Ryan's statement Mostly False. Health care Ryan claimed that Obama took money from Medicare to spend on Obamacare. Romney has said something similar, that "under the president's plan, he cuts Medicare by $716 billion, takes that money out of the Medicare trust fund and uses it to pay for Obamacare." The claim gives the impression that the law takes money that was already allocated to Medicare and funds the new health care law with it. In fact, the law uses a number of measures to try to reduce the rapid growth of future Medicare spending. Those savings are then used to offset costs created by the law -- especially coverage for the uninsured -- so that the overall law doesn't add to the deficit. We rated the statement Half True. Biden said about Ryan and Romney's plan for Medicare, "It's a voucher." Obama made a similar claim in the presidential debate, that Romney "would turn Medicare into a voucher program." The plan would give seniors a premium support payment toward private insurance, to replace the current system of government payments to doctors and hospitals. Generally, we think "voucher program" is a fair way of describing to voters the vision for Medicare under a Romney-Ryan administration. We rated Obama's claim Mostly True. Biden also said Romney and Ryan would "eliminate the guarantee of Medicare." Here's the deal: Calling today’s Medicare benefits "guaranteed" is partially, but not entirely, true. Currently, Medicare does guarantee broad health coverage for seniors and, in the short term, guarantees specific benefits. But Medicare doesn’t cover everything, and Congress and the president can change what is covered -- and will be forced to do so as fiscal pressures hit. Meanwhile, it’s plausible that the Romney plan could provide less of a "guarantee" than Medicare currently does, but we found sharp disagreement between supporters and opponents of Romney’s Medicare plan on that point. This disagreement is hard to resolve given the shortage of information Romney has so far provided. We rated Biden's claim Half True. Ryan, in his closing statement, said Obama "made his choices," including "a government takeover of health care." The phrase is simply not true. "Government takeover" conjures a European approach where the government owns the hospitals and the doctors are public employees. But Obama's health care law relies largely on the free market.  We voted "a government takeover of health care" our Lie of the Year for 2010. Did you hear a claim you would like us to check? Use Twitter hashtag #PolitiFactThis or email us at [email protected]

Biden and Ryan exchange claims, barbs in Kentucky debate

The second debate — and only debate for vice presidential candidates — of the presidential election season is in the books. And like their running mates a week ago, the second-in-command contenders had a lot to say. In some heated exchanges, Vice President Joseph Biden and Congressman Paul Ryan accused each other of distorting information, repeating some familiar talking points from the presidential campaigns. PolitiFact and PolitiFact Georgia are checking statements made by the two candidates Thursday night in Danville, Ky. We will be updating our online site — http://www.politifact.com/georgia/ — throughout the day as fact-checks are completed. Readers can comment on our Truth-O-Meter rulings at our Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia?fref=ts. And they can follow on Twitter at: PolitiFactGA. Below are some initial fact-checks on statements by the candidates or major themes they broached during Thursday’s debate. 

To suggest a fact-check, tweet with #PolitiFactThis

If you have a claim you think we should check, use the #PolitiFactThis hashtag on Twitter. We'll update our website as we post new fact-checks. Readers can comment on our Truth-O-Meter rulings at our Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia and can follow us on Twitter at PolitiFactGA.

Fact-checking the Denver presidential debate

President Barack Obama and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney traded barbs Wednesday night on taxes, jobs, health care and the economy — and often stretched the facts. "Mr. President," Romney said, "you're entitled as the president to your own airplane and to your own house, but not to your own facts." Romney also would have benefited from that advice. We're combing through the pair's remarks from the University of Denver's Ritchie Center, where moderator Jim Lehrer focused on the economy, health care, the role of government and governing. We'll update this story as we post new fact-checks. Readers can comment on our Truth-O-Meter rulings at our Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia and can follow us on Twitter at PolitiFactGA. And we welcome suggestions on what we should fact-check. Email us, fill out the suggestion form on the Settle It! app or tweet us your ideas with #PolitiFactThis. Here's what we've checked so far: Taxes • Obama said that Romney's plan "calls for a $5 trillion tax cut." The figure accounts for only half of Romney's plan, and it's cumulative over 10 years. The governor says he will offset those lost revenues by reducing tax deductions and eliminating loopholes. However, he hasn't specified what those changes would be. The president made a misleading statement about an incomplete plan, but he did describe what the plan was missing and that Romney would not fill in the gaps. We rated the claim Half True. • Obama said that "independent studies" looking at Romney's tax plan say the only way to meet Romney's goal of not adding to the deficit is by "burdening middle class families." A reputable study from the Tax Policy Center found that to meet Romney's deficit goal, middle class taxpayers might lose exemptions and deductions worth about $2,000. So we previously have rated Mostly True a claim that Romney is proposing a tax plan "that would give millionaires another tax break and raise taxes on middle class families by up to $2,000 a year." • Romney said six tax studies look at a study that Obama described and "say it's completely wrong." Previously, Romney has claimed that five studies back his tax plan. We found that Mostly False. We saw no more than two independent studies out of the five claimed. • Obama said he "lowered taxes for small businesses 18 times." When we examined his claim last summer that his administration had "provided at least 16 tax cuts to small businesses," we rated it Mostly True, noting that conservative tax specialists say the statistic ignores proposed and enacted tax hikes on small businesses. Deficit • Romney claimed that Obama had said he would "cut the deficit in half." That's the case. We rated a claim from Crossroads GPS that Obama failed to keep his pledge of halving the deficit True. • Obama said he put forward "a specific $4 trillion deficit reduction plan." That's true if you combine the 10-year impact of his budget with the 10-year impact of cuts already approved. (For that reason, we've previously found his claim that his budget plan would "cut our deficits by $4 trillion" Half True.)   Jobs • Romney said part of his plan to create jobs includes North American energy independence. He said that while oil and gas production might be up, Obama shouldn't get credit — the increase was on private lands, not public. We have previously found that oil production on public lands dropped 14 percent in one year, but that's not the whole story. It was small snapshot, and partly because of hurricanes.  We rated a claim from Crossroads GPS that oil "production's down where Obama's in charge" Half True. Our reporting confirmed Romney's claim that Obama shouldn't get credit — but neither, perhaps, should President George W. Bush. • Romney said half of college graduates can't find a job. We've previously rated that Mostly True — about a quarter of recent college grads can't find a job, while another quarter found jobs that don't require college degrees. Medicare • Romney claimed "on Medicare for current retirees, (Obama is) cutting $716 billion from the program." That amount refers to Obama's reductions in Medicare spending over 10 years, primarily in what's paid to insurers and hospitals. But the statement gives the impression that the law takes money already allocated to Medicare away from current recipients. We rated Romney's claim Half True. • Romney also claimed that Obama used those Medicare savings to pay for his health care law. We've previously rated Romney's claim that Obama took that money from Medicare "to pay for Obamacare" Half True. The new health care law uses a number of measures to try to reduce the rapid growth of future Medicare spending. Those savings are used to offset costs created by the health care law — especially coverage for the uninsured — so that the overall law doesn't add to the deficit. • Obama claimed that the "essence" of Romney's plan for retiree health care was to "turn Medicare into a voucher program." Romney would give seniors a premium support payment toward private insurance, to replace the current system of government payments to doctors and hospitals. Generally, we think "voucher program" is a fair way of describing to voters the vision for Medicare under a Romney-Ryan administration. We rated Obama's claim Mostly True. • Obama recycled an outdated number about vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan's original Medicare proposal, saying that "because the voucher wouldn't necessarily keep up with health care inflation, it was estimated that this would cost the average senior about $6,000 a year." That ignores a more recent Ryan proposal that pegs the size of the voucher to the second-cheapest plan available on a Medicare exchange. We rated a related claim from the secretary of Health and Human Services last month Half True. Health care • Romney said that Obama failed to cut health care premiums by $2,500. That's true. On our Obameter, which tracks Obama's 2008 campaign promises, we've rated that a Promise Broken. • Obama said that Romney used the same advisers to create his Massachusetts health plan that Obama later did for his health care law. Rick Santorum once claimed that a "Romney adviser admits Romneycare was the blueprint for Obamacare." If Santorum's ad had said "former adviser," that would have been True.  • Obama claimed that Romney said his Massachusetts law was a "model for the nation." Romney later fired back that he said it was a model "state by state," not from the federal government down. We've previously found that an early version of Romney's book No Apology did advocate the Massachusetts model as a strong option for other states, as Romney said. • Romney said that Obama "put in place a board that can tell people ultimately what treatments they're going to receive." Romney avoided the more inaccurate and harsher wording of some other critics, who have falsely described the board as "rationing" care. But Romney's claim can leave viewers with the impression that the board makes health care decisions for individual Americans, and that's not the case. We rated his statement Mostly False.

PolitiFact parses truth from fiction in Denver debate

The debate is done, and the fact-checking has begun. PolitiFact and PolitiFact Georgia are checking statements made by Mitt Romney and President Obama during Wednesday’s Denver face-to-face showdown. We will be updating our online site -- http://www.politifact.com/georgia/ -- throughout the day as fact-checks are completed. Readers can comment on our Truth-O-Meter rulings at our Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia?fref=ts. And they can follow on Twitter at: PolitiFactGA. Below are some initial (abbreviated versions of) fact-checks on actual statements by the candidates or major themes they broached during Wednesday’s debate. Look for the complete fact-checks at the PolitiFact online sites.

How to check the facts during the debates

We're planning special coverage for the presidential debates. Here are some tips on how to use PolitiFact as you watch the debate. Go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia) for full versions of fact-checks. Readers can comment on our rulings at the Facebook site. We'll also be live Tweeting the debates on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga), We'll update those pages with new fact-checks throughout the news cycle.

Does Obama make the grade on education reform?

Barack Obama made 31 promises about education, from expanding early learning programs to adding public charter schools. We put his performance to the Obameter. Go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia) for full versions of these and other fact-checks. Readers can comment on our rulings at the FaceBook site. Or find us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga). We update that page with new fact-checks throughout the news cycle.

PAC's newspaper ad makes multiple false claims about Obama

The ad from the Government is Not God PAC has run in papers in Ohio and Florida. We put its claims to the Truth-O-Meter. Go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia) for full versions of these and other fact-checks. Readers can comment on our rulings at the FaceBook site. Or find us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga). We update that page with new fact-checks throughout the news cycle.

Romney ad goes on offense about defense cuts

We fact-check a claim from a Mitt Romney campaign ad that says President Barack Obama wants to cut the defense budget. Go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia) for full versions of these and other fact-checks. Readers can comment on our rulings at the FaceBook site. Or find us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga). We update that page with new fact-checks throughout the news cycle.

A closer look at 'redistribution'

We look into comments from Barack Obama and Mitt Romney on redistribution and find it's long been a part of U.S. tax policy. Go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia) for full versions of these and other fact-checks. Readers can comment on our rulings at the FaceBook site. Or find us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga). We update that page with new fact-checks throughout the news cycle.

Fact-checking Romney's private fundraiser remarks

Grainy video of Mitt Romney talking to big-dollar donors May 17  in Florida has the political world in a tizzy.     PolitiFact has looked into Romney’s remarks in the secretly recorded video and fact-checked several of the comments. Several abbreviated versions of those fact-checks appear below.         Go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia) for full versions of these and other fact-checks. Readers can comment on our rulings at the FaceBook site. Or find us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga). We update that page with new fact-checks throughout the news cycle.

Did the U.S. embassy in Cairo make an apology?

Returning to a frequent theme of his campaign, Mitt Romney on Wednesday charged that the Obama administration, through a statement released by the U.S. embassy in Cairo, made an "apology" to Islamic radicals. We take a closer look. Want to comment on our rulings? Go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia) or find us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga). And check our Facebook page throughout the day. We update it with new fact checks morning, noon and night.

Is 'In God We Trust' still on U.S. coins?

On the campaign trail recently, Mitt Romney brought up an issue that sounded familiar to us: the question of whether "In God We Trust" has been removed from U.S. coins. PolitiFact looked into it. Want to comment on our rulings? Go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia) or find us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga). And check our Facebook page throughout the day. We update it with new fact checks morning, noon and night.

On final night in Charlotte, Obama takes the stage

We fact-check the speeches by President Obama (and his warm-up acts). We’ll be fact-checking speeches throughout the night and will update this story as we do.

Democrats wrap up convention with Obama re-election appeal

President Barack Obama took the stage at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte Thursday to make his case for re-election. PolitiFact, PolitiFact Georgia and the AJC Truth-O-Meter tested some claims by the President and others on the convention’s final day. We will complete a full fact-check of claims made by Obama in Saturday’s paper, and a roundup of claims made throughout the convention on Sunday. Want to comment on our rulings? Go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia) or find us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga). And check our Facebook page throughout the day. We update it with new convention fact-checks morning, noon and night.

Democrats make case for Obama re-election

The Democrats wrapped up their convention Thursday night in Charlotte with President Barack Obama making his case for four more years on the job. Prior to the president’s culminating speech, PolitiFact, PolitiFact Georgia and the AJC Truth-O-Meter tested some claims made by former President Bill Clinton and political leaders during convention appearances. We will complete a full fact-check of claims made by Obama in Saturday’s paper, and a roundup of claims made throughout the convention on Sunday. Want to comment on our rulings? Go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia) or find us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga). And check our Facebook page throughout the day. We update it with new convention fact-checks morning, noon and night.

Bill Clinton sets the stage for President Obama

Former President Bill Clinton made the case for President Barack Obama’s re-election Wednesday night in Charlotte at the Democratic National Convention. The AJC Truth-O-Meter tested some claims made by Clinton and others during the convention’s second day. We will continue monitoring speakers throughout the Charlotte gathering, just like we did for the Republicans in Tampa. Want to comment on our rulings? Go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia) or find us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga). And check our Facebook page throughout the day. We update it with new convention fact checks morning, noon and night.

Democrats on offensive before President Obama’s convention speech

President Barack Obama makes his case tonight for four more years in office during the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte. Before he takes the stage, PolitiFact, PolitiFact Georgia and the AJC Truth-O-Meter tested a few more claims made this week during the convention by Democratic leaders. We will continue monitoring speakers throughout the Charlotte gathering, just like we did for the Republicans in Tampa. Want to comment on our rulings? Go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia) or find us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga). And check our Facebook page throughout the day. We update it with new convention fact checks morning, noon and night.  

Political issues revisited as Democrats convene in Charlotte

Democrats head into the second day of their convention in Charlotte, trying to convince voters that President Barack Obama deserves another four-year term. PolitiFact and PolitiFact Georgia and the AJC Truth-O-Meter will be monitoring speakers throughout the Charlotte gathering, just like we did for the Republicans in Tampa. Want to comment on our rulings? Go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia) or find us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga). And check our Facebook page throughout the day. We update it with new convention fact-checks morning, noon and night.

The lists: Barack Obama's Top 10 Broken and Kept promises

Has the president kept his promises?

Convention speakers throw verbal jabs at Obama

President Barack Obama quipped that Republicans have said some "wonderful" things about him during this week’s national convention in Tampa. Speakers contrasted the president’s record to GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney’s. Others claimed Obama has never worked in business and doesn’t want farm kids to do basic chores. PolitiFact looked at those claims and others. Want to comment on our rulings? Go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia) or find us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga). And check our Facebook page throughout the day. We update it with new convention fact-checks morning and night. Read summaries of some of our latest checks below. Look for a roundup of our fact-checks of Romney’s speech in Saturday’s newspaper.

Truth-O-Meter keeps rolling

The speeches keep coming and our Truth-O-Meter keeps rolling. The Republican National Convention in Tampa scheduled hours of back-to-back speeches pounding President Barack Obama on what they say is his inability to bring about change we can believe in. Who can get the job done? We’ll let you guess the GOP’s answer. And here’s a hint: The theme of Wednesday's session was "We Can Change It." GOP luminaries focused on fiscal responsibility and the economy, which was good news for PolitiFact. Those are two of our favorite subjects. And speaking of the economy, we added a fact-check of a top Obama campaign official who made a claim about Mitt Romney’s position on a popular tax policy. Read these summaries of our latest checks below. Want to comment? Go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia) or find us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga). And check our Facebook page throughout the day. We update it with new convention fact checks morning and night.

Republican convention: Talking about money

Presidential candidate Mitt Romney took center stage Tuesday on PolitiFact and the Truth-O-Meter as Republicans geared up to nominate him at their Tampa convention. First, we tested a talking point GOP leaders are using to cast Mitt Romney as a self-made man: That Romney "gave away his father's inheritance." We also checked Romney’s critique of the economy and its effects on young people. The economy is perhaps the Obama campaign’s biggest hurdle, and Democrats know it. One of his top campaign aides tried to defend him by saying that the recovery during President Barack Obama’s term is stronger than President Ronald Reagan’s. Wrong. We also checked an attack on Obama by Romney’s vice presidential pick U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan about declining household incomes. He was wrong, too. Read these summaries of our findings below. Want to comment on our rulings? Go to our Facebook page, or find us on Twitter. And watch for us during the conventions. We’re providing daily Truth-O-Meter updates for this week’s Republican convention in Tampa and next week’s Democratic convention in Charlotte.

Truth-O-Meter unstoppable amid GOP convention shutdown

Hurricane Isaac may have shut down the Republican National Convention on Monday. But the Truth-O-Meter was unstoppable. PolitiFact arrived in Tampa just as former Florida Gov. Charlie Crist made a surprise endorsement of President Barack Obama in The Tampa Bay Times. He served as governor as a Republican, then ran an unsuccessful bid for the U.S. Senate as an independent. We completed two fact-checks that touched on Crist’s endorsement. Medicare remained a chief concern as the festivities began. Presumptive GOP nominee Mitt Romney accused Obama of hypocrisy, while his vice presidential pick, U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan, said the Romney-Ryan plan "does not affect" benefits for anyone 55 or older. Read these summaries of our findings below. Want to comment on our rulings? Go to our Facebook page or find us on Twitter. PolitiFact will provide daily Truth-O-Meter updates on the GOP before moving on to Charlotte next week to keep tabs on the Democrats.

As the GOP convention kicks off, we review the GOP Pledge-O-Meter

PolitiFact and PolitiFact Georgia will be using the Truth-O-Meter to rate statements made by politicians and power brokers at the Republican and Democratic conventions. To kick off the GOP convention,  we review the "GOP Pledge-O-Meter," which tracks promises made by Republicans during the 2010 midterm election cycle.

Fact-checking the TV game of connect the dots

The Obama and Romney campaigns are engaged in a fierce battle of connect the dots. Faced with incomplete and sometimes skimpy details to attack their opponents, the campaigns are making some overly generous assumptions and -- sometimes -- drawing some wildly inaccurate conclusions. Here are some of our recent fact-checks on campaign ads that try to connect the dots:

Checking the facts on the $700 billion Medicare 'cut'

Seems like just yesterday that the big Republican talking point was that Obamacare cuts $500 billion from Medicare. Now, it's $700 billion. That's the number -- $716 billion to be precise -- that's gotten tossed around this week.

Fact-checking Paul Ryan, vice presidential candidate

Mitt Romney has picked U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., as his vice presidential running mate for the Republican ticket. Here's how Ryan has fared on the Truth-O-Meter.

As Olympics open, a super PAC attack against Romney

Priorities USA Action, a super PAC supporting President Barack Obama, released an ad that uses the trappings of the Olympics to attack Mitt Romney.

The Transportation Tax – Truth, Lies and Gridlock

As the referendum on a tax to fund transportation projects for metro Atlanta nears, our fact check tally rises.  Your PolitiFact Georgia scribes have completed nearly two dozen fact checks on Tuesday's referendum, which has made bedfellows out of earstwhile enemies.  The Sierra Club has joined forces with members of Georgia's Tea Party to oppose the measure, while Chamber of Commerce-types have allied with sustainability advocates to rally for it. Want to comment on our findings? It's easy. Just go to our Facebook page and hit the "like" button. And you are free to express yourself, pro or con. Those for and against the one-percent tax increase say that the facts and figures are on their side. Sometimes they are. Other times they aren’t. We'll tell you who's right in this roundup of our rulings. And check back soon. We'll post more as we write new stories. Here’s how both sides have fared so far:

Transportation Tax: The Best of the Truths, Rumors and Gridlock

The road to Tuesday’s monumental transportation tax vote is paved with truths, rumors and innuendoes. Leave it to the Truth-O-Meter to inspect every bump and crack in the pavement. Since spring, PolitiFact published nearly two dozen stories checking statements about the 10-year, 1 percent sales tax, otherwise known as T-SPLOST. It could raise $8.5 billion over 10 years, after inflation. Want to comment on our transportation tax rulings? Just go to our Facebook page or find us on Twitter. Both sides got it wrong some of the time. Statements by supporters and opponents often fell short of True. And once Election Day is over, we expect the rhetoric to continue. Metro Atlantans love to gripe about traffic. Bring it on. We could go for miles and miles. Read these summaries of our transportation tax rulings below.

PolitiFact a distillery for truth

This story, written by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s managing editor and senior editorial director, ran in the Sunday July 22 edition of the newspaper. There’s something about PolitiFact. Maybe it’s the clarity it forces on public discourse. Perhaps it’s the eye-catching Truth-O-Meter with its brutal simplicity. Or could it be its distaste for nuance in a world grown comfortable with wiggle room? Or maybe people just like when it cheerfully calls out politicians who mangle the truth. Whatever it is, in the just over two years that we have produced it, PolitiFact Georgia has become a force. When people praise the newspaper, they almost always mention PolitiFact.

The PolitiFact guide to Medicare attack lines

Barack Obama has slashed Medicare by $500 billion. Mitt Romney and House Republicans want to end Medicare. And a new board is going to ration care so Washington can waste more money.  Believe any of that? You shouldn’t.  But it’s what the political ads likely will be saying between now and Election Day in November. We have some advice for voters sorting out the claims: Believe nothing you hear in a 30-second TV ad.

Bidding farewell to Newt: our five favorite fact-checks

Few candidates provided more colorful claims to check than former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, who's finally leaving the Republican primary contest. Here are our favorite Newt-centric fact-checks.

Did these marijuana claims go up in smoke?

The Truth-O-Meter takes a look back at some recent fact-checks concerning marijuana.

A history of taxing claims

Is your head spinning from filing your income taxes? Over the last year, we've fact-checked some dizzying claims about the tax system, who pays more and less. Here are some goodies that have been crunched by the Truth-O-Meter.

No shortage of energy claims -- true or otherwise

Politicians won't let you forget that you're paying more for gasoline. Voters are feeling the pinch, and leaders at the top are eager to point the finger. We explore a few of their claims.

Supreme Court debate: Switching sides on the individual mandate

As the U.S. Supreme Court hears oral arguments on the health care law, we recall the flip-flops behind the debate. Some Republicans used to love it; Barack Obama was against it.

In Context: Bill Maher on women

(Want to comment? Go on, mouth off on our Facebook page.) Conservatives are trying to paint liberal comedian Bill Maher as the same kind of public relations hazard for Democrats that Rush Limbaugh has become for Republicans. Limbaugh ignited a firestorm when he called a Georgetown law student a "slut" and "prostitute" after she testified in Congress about health insurance and birth control. (To see her complete comments, read "In Context: In Context: Sandra Fluke on contraceptives and women's health.") Essentially, Limbaugh used misogynistic terms to attack a woman whose political view he opposes. Conservatives point out that at least one politician's daughter has not been off-limits to Maher. How similar are Maher’s and Limbaugh’s comments? We thought this would be a good subject for PolitiFact’s "In Context" series, where we publish controversial statements in their original context.  

Is the U.S. suffering an epidemic of rolling blackouts?

The nation's electrical grid faces long-term challenges. But have President Barack Obama's policies prompted widespread rolling blackouts?

Groggy? Daylight saving may be hazardous to your health

Still recovering from daylight saving time? Brace yourself. PolitiFact Georgia research shows that the time change may be hazardous to your health.

On the Stump: Checking Santorum’s Knoxville speech

PolitiFact is checking the GOP presidential candidates' stump speeches as they battle for the nomination. Now it's time for former Pennsylvania U.S. Senator Rick Santorum to face the Truth-O-Meter. These checks are based on statements he made in Tennessee.

In Context: Sandra Fluke on contraceptives and women's health

Georgetown University law student Sandra Fluke told an unofficial hearing of the Democratic Steering and Policy Committee on Feb. 23, 2012, that the omission of contraceptive coverage by her Jesuit school created "financial, emotional and medical burdens" for students. Her comments caught the ear of conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh, who called Fluke a "slut" and a "prostitute" demanding that taxpayers pay for her to have sex. You've probably heard Limbaugh's words (for which he later said he apologized) repeated plenty. Here's what Fluke said that ignited his ire.

Super Tuesday guide: Finding truth in the attacks

It's Super Tuesday, and Georgians are heading to the polls. Here’s PolitiFact’s guide to the multimillion-dollar ad blitz. With the field down to four Republican contenders, campaigns and super PACs are attacking their opponents with hot-button allegations about supporting Planned Parenthood, Obamacare and even Nancy Pelosi that are designed to strike fear in the hearts of Republican voters. There's been some piling on. We've seen several examples where two (or more) candidates have made the same attack. The one candidate who hasn't been attacked much: Ron Paul. He's has been busy attacking others — but we didn’t find ads attacking him. (If you see one, send it our way!) Want to comment on our findings? Hit the "like" button on our Facebook page to post your thoughts. You can also follow us on Twitter.

Fact-checking pre-Super Tuesday campaign appearances

GOP presidential candidates stormed Georgia and the airwaves Sunday, buffeting voters with one more powerful gust of rhetoric during the final weekend before Super Tuesday Although the appearances were new, the talking points were largely the same. We’ve checked a few of them before. Here’s a look at statements from the three leading candidates: Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich, and former U.S. Senator Rick Santorum.  Want to comment? Go to our Facebook page. You can also try us on Twitter.

Fact-checking the new pro-Mitt Romney ad

The GOP presidential primary campaign may still be in mid-season, but at least one campaign TV ad is already in reruns. Restore our Future, a pro-Mitt Romney super PAC, is slated to air a commercial in Georgia beginning Thursday that, save for a few visuals, is identical to one that ran during the former Massachusetts governor’s failed 2008 presidential campaign.   It’s also similar to a viral Internet story that PolitiFact National checked Jan. 30. Both television ads feature former business partner Robert Gay crediting Romney with helping reunite Gay with his daughter after she went missing. "Mitt’s done a lot of things that people say are nearly impossible," Gay says in both ads. "But for me, the most important thing he’s ever done is to help save my daughter." Did Mitt "help save" Gay’s daughter?

Checking pro-Romney group's new campaign ad

You’ve heard the bashing. Now see the commercial. On Wednesday, Pro-Mitt Romney super PAC Restore Our Future was slated to unveil ads in Georgia arguing that rival Newt Gingrich is too risky a pick for GOP presidential nominee.  Primary day is March 6. We’ve seen it, and it has all the hallmarks of your typical attack ad. Unflattering images, menacing music, and dire claims. Claims that PolitiFact National and other fact-checking outlets happen to have vetted.  

Checking Romney's campaign speech in Atlanta

Super Tuesday is only one month away, which means it’s showtime in Georgia for the GOP’s presidential candidates. GOP candidate Mitt Romney stumped at a small Atlanta business Wednesday to persuade Georgians to choose him in the March 6 primary. PolitiFact Georgia was there, too. And we happened to bring our Truth-O-Meter.

Fact-checking the Republican response

Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels offered the Republican Party's response to Tuesday night's State of the Union address. We checked it for accuracy.

Fact-checking the State of the Union address

President Barack Obama's State of the Union address Tuesday night seemed to be as much about political positioning as it was a report on his progress.

Fact-checking the CNN debate in South Carolina

The presidential debates are shrinking, but they're just as lively as ever. With Rick Perry now out of the race, there were four candidates on stage Thursday night for the CNN debate in Charleston, S.C. We'll be posting new fact-checks later today, but here's a recap of some of the claims we've addressed before.

Fact-checking the Republican debate in Michigan

Republican presidential candidates clashed over the economy Wednesday night on on CNBC — and we're checking the facts.

U.S. Rep. Ron Paul remix

(Editor’s note: With the Iowa caucuses only two months away, PolitiFact Georgia will dedicate this week to summaries of key fact-checks on the leading GOP candidates as well as President Barack Obama’s performance on his 500 campaign promises. Today we look at Ron Paul.) Want to comment on our findings? Visit us on Facebook. Every month since 9/11, there have been as many suicide attacks against the United States and its allies as there were in all the years leading up to 9/11. Paul made this remark Sept. 30 at a forum in Manchester, N.H., to criticize the U.S. for playing "policeman of the world." Whether Paul meant al-Qaida suicide attacks only or all groups who have executed suicide campaigns against the U.S. and its allies was unclear. Either way, the number of suicide attacks against the U.S. and its allies since 9/11 is not "equivalent" to the total before 9/11. The average number each month is actually greater than the total number that predated that day, so Paul is actually understating the magnitude. And the data support his underlying point that the number of attacks since Sept. 11, 2001, has grown. We rate Paul's claim Mostly True.

Herman Cain's golden oldies

(Editor’s note: With the Iowa caucuses only two months away, PolitiFact Georgia will dedicate this week to summaries of key fact-checks on the leading GOP candidates as well as President Barack Obama’s performance on his 500 campaign promises. Today we look at Herman Cain.) Want to comment on our findings? Visit us on Facebook. The 9-9-9 plan "does not raise taxes on those that are making the least." Herman Cain made this claim to defend his tax plan against accusations it would raise taxes on the middle class and poor during the Oct. 18 Republican presidential primary debate in Las Vegas. His plan includes a 9 percent income tax, a 9 percent sales tax and a 9 percent business tax. Based on what Cain’s campaign has said about the plan, the only exemptions on the income tax will be for charitable deductions and for undefined "empowerment" zones that would encourage development in inner cities. The 9 percent sales tax would exclude used goods. Payroll taxes on workers would go away. The Tax Policy Center, an independent policy group that includes tax analysts who have worked in both Democratic and Republican administrations, found that high percentages of lower-income tax filers would see tax increases. Cain’s campaign may release more details on his plan that could change this picture, but knowing what we know now, his claim is False.  

PolitiFact Georgia reviews Gingrich's classics

(Editor’s note: With the Iowa caucuses only two months away, PolitiFact Georgia will dedicate this week to summaries of key fact-checks on the leading GOP candidates as well as President Barack Obama’s performance on his 500 campaign promises. Today we look at Newt Gingrich.) Want to comment on our findings? Visit us on Facebook.

The Best of Texas Gov. Rick Perry

Editor’s note: With the Iowa caucuses only two months away, PolitiFact Georgia will dedicate this week to summaries of key fact-checks on the leading GOP candidates as well as President Barack Obama’s performance on his 500 campaign promises. Today we look at Texas Gov. Rick Perry. Want to comment on our findings? Visit us on Facebook.  "We cut property taxes by one-third in the state of Texas while I’ve been governor." On the campaign trail in New Hampshire Oct. 1, Perry repeated this common battle cry in his campaign for the Republican nomination. He’s referring to House Bill 1, which he signed into law in 2006. It’s intended to reduce property taxes paid to local school districts. The overhaul effectively lowered the maintenance and operation segment of the school tax, from $1.50 to $1.00 per $100 of assessed property value, or about one-third. But it didn’t translate to 33 percent lower bills for taxpayers. If you look at total property tax revenue, Texans paid about the same amount in 2010 as they did in 2005. If you adjust for inflation, he's closer (it's about 9 percent less), but it's still far short of one-third. We find his claim Mostly False.

PolitiFact Georgia recounts Mitt Romney's Greatest Hits

Editor’s note: With the Iowa caucuses only two months away, PolitiFact Georgia will dedicate this week to summaries of key fact-checks on the leading GOP candidates as well as President Barack Obama’s performance on his 500 campaign promises. Today we look at Mitt Romney. Want to comment on our findings? Visit us on Facebook. "The people in Massachusetts like [the state health care plan] by about a 3-1 margin." This was a defense of his record on health care -- when he was governor of Massachusetts -- during an Oct. 11, 2011, debate in Hanover, N.H., where he took heat for signing into law a health care program similar to the reforms passed nationally in 2010. Romney has strong support for this claim. A recent survey by a credible pollster found the ratio of support to opposition for the Massachusetts law at 3 to 1, and other polls suggest levels of support even higher. So we rate Romney’s statement True.

Some new broken promises on the Obameter

With Republicans controlling the House, many of Obama's promises have been rated Stalled or Broken.

Yes he Cain?

Who would have thought that presidential long shot Herman Cain would become the sweetheart of the Republican field? On Friday, the Georgian appeared on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno. Sunday, he was on ABC’s "This Week" with Christiane Amanpour. Monday he hobnobbed with developer Donald Trump. He even gabbed with the ladies of The View.   His new memoir "This is Herman Cain! My Journey to the White House" cracked Amazon’s top 10 list. This political Cinderella tale might not be a fantasy. A CBS poll released Tuesday shows Cain tied with front runner former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney for first place.  Support for the political newbie more than tripled to 17 percent of likely Republican voters in only two weeks. Other polls have also placed him at or near the top of the race. 

Truth-O-Meter passes on claim about 10th Amendment

Fans of limited government, put down those pompoms and get off the sidelines. GOP presidential hopeful Newt Gingrich wants you to join Team 10. Long a rallying point for those who want to curtail the power of federal government, the 10th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution describes the powers held by states and people. It’s been neglected for too long, Gingrich said in a conference call announcing the effort. That’s why Gingrich launched Team 10, an Internet crowd-sourcing initiative, to brainstorm ideas to end big government and get the federal government to "enforce the 10th Amendment," the effort’s Facebook page says.   

Readers chew over ruling on Clinton's vegan diet

A number of readers stood up for crustaceans and other creatures, saying our ruling on a claim by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals didn't pay them enough heed.

Truth-O-Meter takes a bite out of politics. And pit bulls.

Thank goodness the Truth-O-Meter’s a polymath. PolitiFact Georgia relied on its encyclopedic knowledge to tackle subjects as utterly unrelated as pit bull aggression and health care reform. Rulings varied. La Raza, a Hispanic issues advocacy group, earned a True for its claim on the percent of Latino children on Medicaid. U.S. Rep. Phil Gingrey earned a False for his claims that a federal health care board can kill you. A DeKalb County commissioner earned a Mostly True on those controversial canines. Former Atlanta Public Schools Superintendent Beverly Hall earned a False. Curious? Here are shortened versions of our extensive fact-checks. To comment on our findings, hit the "like" button on our Facebook page. You can also follow us on Twitter.

Truth-O-Meter gets tuneup

The Truth-O-Meter endures. But we occasionally give it a tuneup. Due to overwhelming response from our readers, we’re making a slight tweak to our ratings. We are changing our Barely True to Mostly False. Many readers complained the Barely True rating put too much emphasis on "true" when the rating actually describes something without much truth. The definition will remain the same -- "The statement contains an element of truth but ignores critical facts that would give a different impression." Sadly, last week, politicians did not give us the chance to shift the Truth-O-Meter to Mostly False mode. They earned two False ratings one Pants on Fire, and a single True. There’s always next week. To comment on our findings, hit the "like" button on our Facebook page. You can also follow us on Twitter.  

A change in the meter: Barely True is now Mostly False

After an overwhelming response from readers, we're changing the Truth-O-Meter. Barely True will now be called Mostly False.

Good week for truthiness at PolitiFact Georgia

Politicians kept the truth close at hand at PolitiFact Georgia last week. Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp earned a True on a claim about election law violations. So did Johns Creek Mayor Mike Bodker, who talked about the region’s transportation needs. A criminal justice expert earned a Mostly True when he questioned the effectiveness of Atlanta’s curfew law. State Sen. Jack Murphy strayed the furthest from the truth with a statement on immigration. Half True, we ruled. All in all, not a bad week for Truthiness. To comment on our findings, hit the "like" button on our Facebook page.You can also follow us on Twitter.

Barely True, Mostly False: Our readers speak out

When we asked for reader opinion about whether to change our Barely True rating to Mostly False, the floodgates opened. And the comments went heavily in one direction.

Truth-O-Meter gets education on education

A state investigation that confirmed reports of widespread cheating at Atlanta Public Schools sent politicians into full spin mode. Last week, PolitiFact Georgia found some of those pols were well worth a fact check -- or two. The Truth-O-Meter first put former Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin to the test. She said ex- Superintendent Beverly Hall, who was implicated in the scandal, left APS better than she found it. Franklin earned another check when she said that only a small percentage of district educators were involved in cheating.    Midweek, PolitiFact Georgia took a break from education matters to see whether Gov. Nathan Deal fulfilled a promise on zero-based budgeting. Then we aimed the Truth-O-Meter at state Rep. Ralph Long, who laid some of the blame for APS cheating at the feet of Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed. How did politicians fare? Read shortened versions of these fact checks below. To comment on our findings, hit the "like" button on our Facebook page. You can also follow us on Twitter.

Apple honors PolitiFact app

Apple is highlighting the PolitiFact app on the iTunes home page, calling it "New and Noteworthy." We rate that statement True.

Meters tackle history, landfill waste

Trust your Truth-O-Meter and Deal-O-Meter to master topics as different as fiscal responsibility, President Ronald Reagan and landfill waste. Last week, the Truth-O-Meter examined an attack that blamed two Democratic congressmen from Georgia for the nation’s fiscal problems.   It also performed a second check of former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich’s knowledge of Reagan history. The Republican presidential candidate keeps name-dropping the conservative hero. Now, he’s comparing himself to him. To top it off, the Deal-O-Meter rated a promise by Gov. Nathan Deal that he will reduce landfill waste.   Watch out. PolitiFact Georgia’s a quick study. To comment on our findings, hit the "like" button on our Facebook page. You can also follow us on Twitter.

Tireless Truth-O-Meter travels time

PolitiFact Georgia sent the Truth-O-Meter on assignment last week. Its destination: the past. It traveled to the civil rights era to assess whether Birmingham was truly the "cradle of the civil rights movement." It visited President Ronald Reagan’s successful 1980 campaign to check a claim by former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich, and stopped during Reconstruction’s early days to look at similarities between current Georgia immigration laws and the infamous Black Codes. Then our gizmo, ever tireless, roved the fields of current-day South Georgia to check out a pilot program that uses probationers to ease a labor shortage. Abbreviated versions of those fact-checks can be found below. Want to comment on our findings? Just hit the "like" button on our Facebook page. You can also follow us on Twitter.

Presidential politics keeps Truth-O-Meter busy

Presidential campaign politics put the Truth-O-Meter on overdrive. Two of Georgia’s sons are angling for the 2012 Republican nomination for president, and they  gave us plenty of fodder last week. We took on statements by former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich on government waste and right-to-work states, and former radio host and Godfather’s  Pizza CEO Herman Cain on Islamic law. We also marked a milestone. The Deal-O-Meter handed Gov. Nathan Deal his first "Promise Broken." Deal accepted a perk from Delta airline, which broke his policy on accepting gifts. Hit the "like" button on our Facebook page to comment on our rulings. You can also follow us on Twitter.

Gingrich repeats Half True "food stamp" claim

Former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich keeps on calling President Barack Obama the "food stamp president." Never mind that the Truth-O-Meter rated this label Half True in May.

Fact checking Newt Gingrich's speech at the Atlanta Press Club

PolitiFact Georgia kept our Truth-O-Meter handy for Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich’s appearance at the Atlanta Press Club Wednesday. It served us well. The former U.S. House speaker made claims during the breakfast talk that the Truth-O-Meter previously checked.

Kingston re-uses Barely True talking point

U.S. Rep. Jack Kingston of Savannah recently dusted off an old talking point to argue for cuts to the Food and Drug Administration's budget. Unfortunately for him, that talking point nearly flunked the Truth-O-Meter test back in January. Opponents think the cuts Kingston supports will set back a historic tightening of food safety rules, said a Washington Post article published Thursday. Kingston argued that federal budget cuts are necessary, but the safety rules are not.

Truth-O-Meter's business is business

From the pizza trade to sports management, the Truth-O-Meter was up to all sorts of business last week. We began with a fact check on the corporate track record of Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain at Godfather’s Pizza. We followed with checks on wages in Georgia’s agriculture business and economic recovery data. To wrap up the workweek, we covered crime and the business of football. Baltimore Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis, welcome to the Truth-O-Meter.  Want to comment on our findings? Hit the "like" button on our Facebook page to join the discussion. You can also follow us on Twitter.

With truth scarce, pants burn

The truth was scarce in Georgia politics last week. PolitiFact Georgia’s scribes struggled to find scraps of truth in statements on the reapportionment process, Gwinnett schools, Muslims in a potential Cabinet for presidential candidate Herman Cain, and trauma centers. But it was nearly for naught. We gave three Barely Trues and one Pants on Fire. It was the second time Cain’s britches have burned since he began hinting at his presidential ambitions. Want to comment on our findings? Hit the "like" button on our Facebook page to join the discussion. You can also follow us on Twitter.

Happy Birthday to Us!

Break out the bubbly. Despite the best efforts of politicians, PolitiFact Georgia has made it to its first birthday. The Truth-O-Meter had a colorful inaugural year. We covered 2010 midterm election high jinks, the struggling economy, the Georgia immigration debate and even a claim about zombies at the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. Political luminaries such as former Gov. Roy Barnes registered their discontent publicly. You were kind enough to read our work- - especially on zombies and presidential candidate Herman Cain, according to our top five list of fact checks by Web page views: 1. The Walking Dead: In the case of a catastrophic event, the Atlanta-area offices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will self-destruct. Dec. 5, 2010 2.  NFL Players Association: A National Football League lockout would cost Atlanta $160 million in lost jobs and revenue. Nov. 22, 2010 3. U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano: "Very, very, very few people get a pat-down" when they go through airport security, May 7, 2011 4. Herman Cain: In the U.S. Constitution, "there’s a little section in there that talks about life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness." May 21, 2011 5. Herman Cain: Said Planned Parenthood’s early objective was to "help kill black babies before they came into the world." March 15, 2011 And now, to celebrate, here’s a sampling of a few of our more memorable fact-checks.  Want to comment on our findings? Hit the "like" button on our Facebook page to join the discussion. You can also follow us on Twitter.

Run, Georgia, Run!

With the entry of former pizza CEO and talk show host Herman Cain into the 2012 presidential race, our fair state now boasts two presidential prospects. This means PolitiFact Georgia has the pleasure of checking both of them. Newt Gingrich, whose campaign offices are in Buckhead, earned a True on health care. Cain scored a Mostly True on his claim about food stamp use and False on a gaffe about the U.S. Constitution.  Not to ignore national politics, we gave U.S. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi a Pants on Fire for a chart she posted about the national debt. Her Republican counterpart, U.S. House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, earned a Mostly True for a statement he made on U.S. coal to the Atlanta Press Club. Run, Georgia, run! Want to comment on our findings? Hit the "like" button on our Facebook page to join the discussion. You can also follow us on Twitter.

Truth-O-Meter patrols the border

PolitiFact Georgia has you covered on homeland security. The Obama administration trumpeted its reputation on border security recently, so last week, we checked claims about Transportation and Security Administration pat-downs and the border fence. We also switched on our Deal-O-Meter to check whether Gov. Nathan Deal’s signature on Arizona-style immigration enforcement legislation means he kept a campaign promise. For variety, we checked Deal on a claim about the cost of childhood obesity and presidential prospect Newt Gingrich on President Barack Obama and food stamps. Want to comment on our findings? Hit the "like" button on our Facebook page to join the discussion. You can also follow us on Twitter.

Gingrich: One web video, two false claims

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich announced his run for the presidency in a web video. But he was less than accurate in two of his claims.

Call the doctor! Truthiness in critical condition

Truthiness was in critical condition at PolitiFact Georgia last week. Our team published three fact checks in a row on health care. The first from presidential hopeful Herman Cain on CT scans flat-lined. One by U.S. Sen. Saxby Chambliss of Georgia on Internal Revenue Service agents and the health care overhaul was DOA. Another by U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius about hospital care survived and is in good condition. Even on issues outside of health care, truthiness looked at least a little bit puny. A claim by Donald Trump that the U.S. no longer builds bridges needed major surgery, as did a statement by MARTA’s chairman that the transit system is getting safer. Want to comment on our findings? Hit the "like" button on our Facebook page to join the discussion. You can also follow us on Twitter.

Curious about Herman Cain? Consult the Truth-O-Meter

The performance of Georgia's own Herman Cain during last night’s Republican presidential debate is sending political opinionators buzzing. After the debate, Fox News aired discussion between veteran political consultant and pollster Frank Luntz and a focus group. Members said that before last night, they didn’t know much about Cain. Afterwards, most of them loved him. Luntz was bowled over. "Something very special happened this evening," he concluded. 

Obama gets Promise Kept for bin Laden campaign vow

With the announcement that Osama Bin Laden is dead, many PolitiFact readers have pointed out President Obama's vow to kill him from October 2008. Is it the president's most significant Promise Kept?

PolitiFact checks run gamut

Last week, the trusty Truth-O-Meter took on everyone from President Barack Obama to a metro Atlanta Republican flirting with a presidential run to a University of Georgia student activist. And we threw in the governor for good measure. You can find our fearless engine of truthiness Sunday through Friday in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and online. Want to comment on our findings? Find our Facebook page and hit the "like" button to join the discussion. You can also follow us on Twitter.

It's getting hot in here!

Things got hot at PolitiFact Georgia, thanks to Josef Stalin, an aging stripper and a Cobb County school board member. Some days, there was nary a whiff of burning pants in the newsroom air. Atlanta Police Chief George Turner and U.S. Rep. Tom Graves earned Trues on crime statistics and taxes, respectively. It all changed when U.S. Rep. Paul Broun cranked up the heat with a False claim about President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Stalin. A Cobb County school board member made a weak claim about the school calendar.    Democrats earned a Pants on Fire for an ad that claimed seniors might have to find work mowing lawns or running lemonade stands to pay for Medicare because of Republicans. In one scenario, an elderly man resorted to stripping. Hot! Want to comment on our findings? Go to our Facebook page and hit the "like" button to join the discussion. You can also follow us on Twitter.

PolitiFact Georgia goes for broke on the national debt

Thanks to recent battles over federal spending, the Truth-O-Meter hit a jackpot of claims that need checking. U.S. Sens. Saxby Chambliss of Georgia and Mark Warner of Virginia barnstormed the Atlanta area Monday to drum up support for reducing the national debt, so PolitiFact Georgia went for broke. We greeted them with rapid-fire fact checks. The budget hawks were mostly on the money. Warner won a True on Social Security data. Chambliss scored a Mostly True on debt growth figures and a Half True on how tax cuts impact tax revenue. MoveOn.org and U.S. Rep. Paul Broun of Athens shortchanged us on the facts. Both earned False rulings on the budget debate. Want to comment on our findings? Go to our Facebook page and hit the "like" button to join the discussion. You can also follow us on Twitter.

Some claims held water. Others needed to be flushed.

PolitiFact Georgia had a week of extremes.   The Truth-O-Meter dished out one Mostly True and a True to the head of a conservation group on water issues and prospective GOP presidential candidate Newt Gingrich on prisons. The Deal-O-Meter ruled Gov. Nathan Deal was making progress on a promise he made about the Race to the Top education program. Then the Truth-O-Meter lit Georgia presidential prospect Herman Cain’s Pants on Fire. He claimed Planned Parenthood was started to kill black babies before they were born. The Obameter gave a "Promise Broken" to President Barack Obama’s on foreclosure prevention. Want to comment on our findings? Go to our Facebook page and hit the "like" button to join the discussion. You can also follow us on Twitter.

Losing sleep? Think of the Truth-O-Meter as a night light

Between the national debt, the nuclear crisis in Japan, labor unrest and U.S. intervention in Libya, current events give us plenty of reasons to lose sleep. Rest assured. Like the trustiest of night lights, the Truth-O-Meter is here to comfort you. Last week, it sussed out the truth on statements about all those subjects. And if you’re losing sleep over lost sleep -- well, knock it off. The Truth-O-Meter found that lost sleep can be hazardous to your health. Want to comment on our findings? Go to our Facebook page and hit the "like" button to join the discussion. You can also follow us on Twitter.

Did Obama, Gingrich flip-flop on Libya?

We put President Barack Obama and one of his potential challengers in 2012, Newt Gingrich, to the Flip-O-Meter to gauge the consistency of their views on military action in Libya.

Truth-O-Meter cares about your health. And gas prices.

By Willoughby Mariano PolitiFact Georgia cares about your health. Our proof is this week’s Truth-O-Meter rulings, which covered a promise by Gov. Nathan Deal on health insurance, federal funding for reproductive health services and a statement conservative pundit Ann Coulter made on whether radiation can be good for you.    Thinking about sticking your head into the nearest X-ray machine?  Read our roundup first. And for variety’s sake, read our items about rising gas prices and whether the HOPE scholarship helped improve Georgia’s public universities, too. Want to comment on our findings? Just go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia) and hit the "like" button to join in the discussion. You can also follow us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/politifactga). You can find the entire fact-checks at our PolitiFact Georgia online site.

From booze to schools, Truth-O-Meter does it all

From Sunday booze to overpriced oil, from streetcars to schools, PolitiFact Georgia’s Truth-O-Meter covered it all last week. Were you curious whether loosening restrictions on Sunday alcohol sales would lead to more drunken driving? Did Gov. Nathan Deal’s changes to the popular HOPE scholarship make Georgia stingy on education?  Is President Barack Obama doing enough to keep oil prices down? Is there anything the Truth-O-Meter can’t do? Want to comment on our findings? Just go to our Facebook page and hit the "like" button to join in the discussion. You can also follow us on Twitter.

Remembering David Broder and his passion for fact-checking

The legendary Washington Post political writer was an early promoter of fact-checking.

PolitiFact checks out toll roads, chickens

Last week, PolitiFact Georgia did its fair share of cluck-clucking. Claims about a proposed immigration measure, a reading of the U.S. Constitution by the backer of a "birther" bill and a take on federal law about the U.S. Supreme Court all ruffled the Truth-O-Meter’s feathers. We also updated the progress Gov. Nathan Deal made on his promise to end the Ga. 400 tolls and discerned whether a candidate for Gwinnett County chairman was a faux chicken farmer -- the accuser laid an egg on that one.   Have something to say about our rulings? Squawk away on our Facebook page or tweet our successes or failings on Twitter.

Polifact Georgia tickled by Elmo, truthiness

Move over, Elmo. After last week’s outbreak of truthiness, no one can be more tickled than PolitiFact Georgia. Partisans were on target about subjects as disparate as county budget cuts and "Sesame Street," which launched the career of the Muppet that inspired the Tickle Me Elmo doll. They even fared well on the contentious issues of illegal immigration and abortion. The sole exception was President Barack Obama on Social Security checks. Have something to say about our rulings? Speak your mind on our Facebook page or tweet our failings on Twitter.

Truth-O-Meter sniffs out cheesy claims

The Truth-O-Meter spent last week searching for holes in politicians’ statements. And boy, did we find some cheesy ones. In fact, we found one about Swiss cheese from U.S. Rep. Lynn Westmoreland. It paired nicely with a Mostly True statement about alcohol that we ran the following day. It was a PolitiFact Georgia version of a cocktail party. The festivities were brief. We marched on to cover statements on immigration and federal fiances. One from President Barack Obama stank like a slab of Limburger cheese. Join us on Twitter and Facebook to comment and read our latest updates.

A senator gets it right, a president gets it wrong

U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson got an A in math, but President Obama scrambled the facts

Truth-O-Meter burrows for the truth

Trust PolitiFact Georgia to burrow for the darkest and fuzziest of truths. Last week, we tested a DeKalb County congressman on the economy, an Athens congressman on one of his tweets, boosterish claims about Atlanta tourism, and whether Egypt’s ambassador has his facts straight. Most importantly, we uncovered that metro Atlanta’s groundhog General Beauregard Lee, long overshadowed by the more famous Punxsutawney Phil, is better at predicting the weather. Scandalous. Join us on Twitter and Facebook to comment and read our latest updates.

Truth-O-Meter points needle at state politics

Georgia’s political engine is revved up for this year’s legislative session, and the Truth-O-Meter and Deal-O-Meter are, too. Last week’s focus was on state issues -- ethics laws, health insurance and a major overhaul of the tax system. There was good and bad news. New Gov. Nathan Deal made headway on two campaign promises. Others’ claims on taxes and ethics lacked truthiness.  Join us on Twitter and Facebook to comment and read our latest updates.

Fact-checking Obama's State of the Union

Obama struck a centrist tone in his second State of the Union speech, arguing for corporate tax cuts and fewer government regulations.

The Truth-O-Meter's got your number

Politicians, the Truth-O-Meter’s got your number. Or rather, numbers. Georgia’s leaders use all kinds of statistics to shore up their stances. Some mean exactly what politicians claim. Others? Not so much. Last week, we analyzed numbers on Snowpocalypse 2011, the safety of the nation’s food supply, immigration and health care. For extra measure, we added up President Barack Obama’s batting average. Join us on Twitter and Facebook to comment and read our latest updates.

The Obama halftime report

At the mid-point in Obama's four-year term, PolitiFact reviews how he's done with his campaign promises.

PolitiFact Georgia cranks up the Deal-O-Meter

Like the Truth-O-Meter? Then meet the Deal-O-Meter. AJC PolitiFact Georgia's new gizmo detects whether our freshly minted governor, Nathan Deal, lives up to his campaign promises. We rolled it out just in time for Inauguration Day on Monday. It has already ruled on promises Deal made on ethics, personal finances and a slew of other issues.  Not that the Truth-O-Meter is idle. We sent it to south central Georgia to learn about wild hogs, then to D.C. for an item on the national debt. Join us on Twitter and Facebook to comment and read our latest updates.

Truth-O-Meter rattles saber, burns britches

Last week, AJC PolitiFact Georgia's Truth-O-Meter emerged from its holiday slumber and rattled its saber.   First, it made quick work of claims on subjects including corporate tax rates, Atlanta's budget and whether DeKalb is the "greenest" county in America. Then, in honor of the Civil War's sesquicentennial, it burned some britches for a group's claim that blacks fought in droves for the Confederacy. The Truth-O-Meter takes no prisoners. Join us on Twitter and Facebook to comment and read our latest updates.

PolitiFact readers tell us what they think

Six months of truth-seeking by PolitiFact Georgia has left our mailbags bulging. We wanted to share some of those missives as we prepare to give the AJC Truth-O-Meter a rest until Jan. 3. Don't worry. The AJC truth squad returns just in time to get ready for the state Legislature and a new governor. We'll introduce a new feature in early January to keep track of Gov.-elect Nathan Deal's campaign promises. And we'll be paying close attention to what your lawmakers -- and other power brokers -- in the state House of Representatives and Senate are saying. In the meantime, here's what some of you had to say about our efforts since we first cranked up the Truth-O-Meter back in early June:

2010: The Year in Misrepresentations

The new year approaches, and your AJC PolitiFact Georgia team is growing misty-eyed.  Although we launched only six months ago, we already have cherished memories of pants we've burned, or slightly singed. As the AJC Truth-O-Meter winds down for the year, we thought we would share a few of those moments when we smelled flames. Here, in chronological order, are the summaries of some of our favorite untruths and misrepresentations of 2010:

Holidays prompt outbreak of truthiness

Folks must be feeling goodwill toward their fellow man this holiday season. Last week, AJC PolitiFact Georgia experienced an outbreak of truthiness. Washington lawmakers found some accurate things to say about federal programs on the homeless and President Barack Obama's proposed tax compromise that just worked its way through Congress. We also uncovered some truths about Georgia public higher education and our beloved Atlanta Braves. We're shocked. And relieved. Happy Holidays.  Join us on Twitter and Facebook to comment and read our latest updates.

PolitiFact Georgia roasts pants, brightens lives

Nothing beats a good, warm fire to brighten our lives during these frigid winter days. So last week, AJC PolitiFact Georgia set two pairs of pants ablaze. The first Pants On Fire ruling belonged to TV and radio host Glenn Beck, who compared a real Ohio town to fictional Bedford Falls of the classic holiday movie "It's a Wonderful Life." The second belonged to AMC hit show "The Walking Dead," which blew up Atlanta's Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as part of the Zombie Apocalypse. Some pairs survived intact. President Barack Obama did OK and a crime ranking earned a Half True, but the britches of the National Football League Players Association got singed. Join us on Twitter and Facebook to comment and read our latest updates.

No pants burned, but toilets did flush

No Pants caught On Fire last week, but AJC PolitiFact Georgia did flush a few claims down the toilet. One claim was literally about commodes. A DeKalb County pol said low-flow versions can cost up to $1,000. Sometimes yes, often no, we found. Half True. But after reading others on red-light cameras and unemployment benefits, we reached for the handle and flushed several times.  Want to comment on our rulings? Join us on Twitter and Facebook. You can also get our latest updates there.

Last week's themes: Money and Power

Last week's themes were money and power. AJC PolitiFact Georgia used the Truth-O-Meter on General Assembly Republicans, who stripped power from Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle and cheerily called it a "power-sharing agreement.” We tested former President George W. Bush on his record on the national debt. And to mark the start of Atlanta's fledgling bid to bring back the Super Bowl, we looked at the last time the game came to town. The Atlanta Sports Council said its economic impact was $292 million. Was it really that much? Join us on Twitter and Facebook for our latest updates.

With the election's end, 'truthiness' improves

The election cycle might have ended, but the old Truth-O-Meter kept spinning last week at AJC PolitiFact Georgia. Topics ranged from animal abuse to the national debt to high school graduation rates. And just about the time Georgians were finishing off the last of the Halloween candy and beginning to plan for the Thanksgiving feast, we took a look at childhood obesity. It was an unusually "truthy" week, as it turned out. We'd like to take some credit for keeping the power brokers a little more honest. But then we'd probably have to give ourselves a "Pants on Fire." We hear the state Legislature will be returning to Atlanta in a few months. So it's fitting, we had a bit of a break from the usual mendacity. The Truth-O-Meter needs all the rest it can get before the General Assembly's calamitous return. In the meantime, we'll keep the Truth-O-Meter primed. Join us on Twitter and Facebook for our latest updates.

Elections are over, but the Truth-O-Meter abides

Memories of the 2010 election may be fading, but the Truth-O-Meter abides. Politicians take liberties with the truth in all seasons. Reporters at AJC PolitiFact Georgia will test their truthiness through the winter holidays and beyond. Last week we paused to make room for other election coverage. This means today's roundup includes only three items. Enjoy. And join us on Twitter and Facebook for our latest updates.

Don't panic. Use your Truth-O-Meter.

Election Day is tomorrow. Don't panic. Your Truth-O-Meter is here to help. It's been working hard all election season, which means that AJC PolitiFact Georgia can now present to you a roundup of some of our rulings on the governor's race. Our findings aren't pretty. Experts told us the rivalry between Democrat Roy Barnes, a former governor, and Republican Nathan Deal, a former U.S. congressman, will go down as one of the ugliest in recent history. The state's biggest congressional race, which is in a district that snakes through the center of the state, also took a stroll through the mud. And the Atlanta area's toughest General Assembly race is in flames. Brace yourselves. And don't forget your Truth-O-Meter. Join us on Twitter and Facebook for our latest updates.

Final days of election: Dynamite!

We're in the election's final stretch, and politicians have dynamite in their hands. As our sister site PolitiFact National noted in an analysis of this election season's claims, "campaigns often begin with a kernel of truth. But then they stretch it, twist it and blow it up." In Georgia, politicians went nuclear with claims on jobs, legislation on child abuse and ethics violations. This week's wreckage could have been far worse. We ruled Mostly True on a claim by Democratic candidate for governor Roy Barnes. But our overall analysis of the gubernatorial campaign shows that if we had a Nastymeter, it would have spun like the Wheelie ride at Six Flags Over Georgia. Don't try this on an empty stomach, ladies and gentlemen. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for our latest updates.

Labor commissioner hopeful Butler accused of trying to "bully" educators

We've heard a lot of name-calling and accusations this political season. Democrat Darryl Hicks added a word to the lexicon in a recent commercial about his main rival, Republican Mark Butler, in the race for Georgia labor commissioner. Bully. "Mark Butler has tried to bully Georgia educators and now he's trying to bully Georgia voters," Hicks said. So what is Hicks talking about? Hicks has accused Butler, a former state representative, of trying to "strong-arm" University of West Georgia officials into rehiring a woman he dated.

As election approaches, Truth-o-Meter whirls

With only days to go until Election Day, candidates kept the Truth-O-Meter whirling last week. Our trusty meter ventured overseas and back again for claims on Mexican workers, Chinese wind turbines and Washington health care. Homegrown controversies over political TV ads on the rape shield law and education funding were also up for inspection.  No one fared well. All our rulings were Half True or worse. Election Day is Nov. 2. Want to comment? Try us on Facebook or Twitter.

Truth-O-Meter stuck on Half True

The Truth-O-Meter spent much of the past week stuck on Half True. Hope as we might that politicians and pundits would be beacons of truth, they struggled to get things right on everything from mammograms to the federal budget. In one case, both Democrats and Republicans fumbled on the same issue: foreign money in U.S. elections. And in one case -- taxes -- a Republican got it mostly right. Want to comment on our rulings? Try us on Facebook or Twitter. Here's how things went down: 

Truth-O-Meter spent week detecting exaggerations

This week's AJC PolitiFact Georgia was brought to you by the word "exaggeration." Politicians exaggerated their successes, stated remote possibilities as fact, overreached with their logic, and in one case, overstated the lengths of other nations' school years by a couple of weeks.  Politicians of all levels of renown diverged from the truth. This week, the Truth-O-Meter tested Nobel Peace Prize winner and former President Jimmy Carter, President Barack Obama, U.S. House Rep. Phil Gingrey and state House Rep. Jill Chambers.   Want to tell us we're wrong? Comment on our Facebook page or Twitter feed. Here's how the politicians fared last week:

Obama exaggerates his record on campaign promises

The president says he's kept 70 percent. We check his claim on our Obameter and find it's actually only 24 percent.

They flipped. They flopped. We wrote.

The Flip-O-Meter spun like a top last week. And once the Truth-O-Meter burned. We owe this to the State Road and Tollway Authority, which voted to extend the toll on Ga. 400 to 2020. And Democrat candidate for governor Roy Barnes, who mentioned he'd like to run a "civil and polite" campaign to win back his old job. And there's House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., whose office took a quote out of context. Hence the smoke. Others fared better. Citizens of the Republic, a group run by veterans of President Ronald Reagan's administration, stuck to the facts. And a Libertarian candidate for U.S. Senate got things half right. We invite you to join our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter. You keep reading, and we'll keep the old Truth-O-Meter churning. Here's how we ruled last week:

Truth-O-Meter travels back in time

AJC PolitiFact Georgia went back in history last week on its search for the truth. Way back. Like a century ago -- the dawn of our nation's dependence on fossil fuel. That's when wooden pipelines were used to transport natural gas. We found out whether they're still in use today. And two decades ago, when Georgians debated whether to institute the lottery that now funds the popular HOPE Scholarship for college-bound high schoolers. Did former Gov. Roy Barnes, who's trying to reclaim his seat, oppose the scholarship? The Truth-O-Meter's other jaunts into the past had to do with more recent history. Think five years ago, when the state argued over whether to toughen its voter ID laws. Or the turn of the millennium, when Barnes, a Democrat, was governor. Republicans claimed he was weak on education and jobs back then. It's also when a DeKalb County school board member said she started handing over to the county what totaled $30,000 in unused travel money. Did she? This is how we ruled.

Stakes high for AJC PolitiFact Georgia

The stakes were high for AJC PolitiFact Georgia last week. Two U.S. senators and a Clayton County official made claims on one of this state's hottest topics: jobs. The White House sparred with U.S. House Republican leader John Boehner over tax cuts that could have a major impact on the struggling economy. Republican governors tried to thwart the efforts of Democrat Roy Barnes to reclaim the governor's seat. And a candidate for agriculture commissioner bet about $1 billion in economic benefit would rain down if we let Georgians gamble on ponies. Here's a roundup of this week's rulings:  

Ghosts of politics past and future haunt Truth-O-Meter

The ghosts of politics past and future haunted the Truth-O-Meter last week. AJC PolitiFact Georgia went back in time to explore unemployment during the era of President Ronald Reagan and looked at decades of GOP gubernatorial candidate Nathan Deal's tax returns. We also looked into the future. Deal's opponent former Gov. Roy Barnes promised one where an energy-efficiency retrofitting project brings 10,000 jobs to Georgia. An environmentalist predicted one of oil dependence. And President Barack Obama raised the specter of a country where Social Security is privatized. Here's how we ruled:

Politicians (and Glenn Beck) had money on their minds

Politicos had money and a mosque on their minds last week. We covered statements on the federal government's money woes, casinos, a tax break for low-income families, and the mosque near ground zero. A diverse crew including conservative TV host Glenn Beck and Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Michael Thurmond graced our pages.   Some did better than others on the Truth-O-Meter and its cousin, the Flip-O-Meter, which measures flip-flops, but all escaped our worst rating: Pants On Fire. Maybe next week. Here's a roundup of our rulings.

Politicians had a rough time with the truth

The truth and politicos were strangers last week. The Truth-O-Meter ruled Half True and worse on statements about "dirty" campaign contributions, stimulus spending, the community center and mosque near ground zero, and sexual deviance. And our Flip-O-Meter, which detects whether politicians have shifted their opinions, found that a gubernatorial candidate inched away from his ideal of running a "civil and polite" campaign. Here's how the politicos fared:

PolitiFact Georgia has week of relative truthiness

PolitiFact Georgia had a week of relative truthiness. We tackled a potpourri of subjects in the past seven days. They included whether federal employees bring home more bacon than your average private-sector employee and a juicy article in Esquire magazine on Newt Gingrich that said his fundraising outshone even that of Republican superstar Sarah Palin.  Two were statements made on national networks: One on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on NBC's "Today" and a second from NBC's "Meet the Press" on stimulus spending. The week's tally: one False, two Half Trues, two Mostly Trues and one True. Here's how the Truth-O-Meter ruled:

It's primary runoff time. Don't forget your Truth-O-Meter

Are you voting in Tuesday's runoff election? Don't forget your Truth-O-Meter. Runoffs can be ugly, and this political season is no exception. In the 19 days since the primary, PolitiFact Georgia has debunked enough attacks to fill an entire election season.  In the Republican gubernatorial runoff alone, we've covered attacks on abortion, negative campaigning, and one candidate's voting record from 17 years ago. Even Trig, former vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin's toddler son, became a point of contention in that race. We've written items on four elections for statewide office in the past two months: the Republican race for governor, the Democratic race for secretary of state, the Republican race for attorney general, and the Republican race for commissioner of insurance. Here's how they fared against the Truth-O-Meter.

It's election time. Have you read your Truth-O-Meter?

Are you voting in Tuesday's primary election? The Truth-O-Meter has caught Georgia's gubernatorial candidates uttering Truths, Half Truths and worse this political season. Here's a round-up of what they said and how we ruled.

Was candidate excluded because of her race?

Republican congressional candidate Liz Carter said she was excluded from a candidate forum last week because she is white. The forum's organizers, who are black, said that's not true. In the complex and often controversial world of Atlanta-area racial politics, such issues are never easy to simplify. PolitiFact jumps into the fray to sort it all out.