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Louis Jacobson
By Louis Jacobson January 3, 2013
Molly Moorhead
By Molly Moorhead January 3, 2013

No change to tax rules for publicly traded partnerships

During the 2008 presidential campaign, Barack Obama promised to "require publicly traded financial partnerships to pay the corporate income tax."

As we noted the last time we looked at this promise, partnerships function a little differently than a traditional corporation.

Partnerships have co-owners as opposed to stockholders, for example, and they are treated differently under the tax code. This promise was one of several Obama made that would result in increasing taxes on the wealthy.

In the bill that avoided the fiscal cliff, Obama did enact higher taxes on richer Americans, but not in the way outlined in this promise.

Like a related promise -- to tax "carried interest" as ordinary income rather than capital gains -- this one was not enacted, said Mary Lyman, executive director of the National Association of Publicly Traded Partnerships.

We rate this a Promise Broken.

Our Sources

Text of H.R. 8 ("fiscal cliff" bill)

House Republican Conference, summary of H.R. 8 ("fiscal cliff" bill), Jan. 1, 2013

Interview with Mary Lyman, executive director of the National Association of Publicly Traded Partnerships, Jan. 3, 2013

Angie Drobnic Holan
By Angie Drobnic Holan December 28, 2009

Tax promise goes by the wayside

Yes, this promise is a little obscure. During the campaign, President Barack Obama promised to require financial partnerships to pay the same tax rates as corporations. Partnerships function a little differently than a traditional corporation -- partnerships have co-owners as opposed to stockholders, for example -- and they are treated differently under the tax code. This promise was one of several Obama made that would result in increasing taxes on the wealthy.

We have been able to find no evidence that any movement has been made on this promise. We checked with the experts at the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center, and they didn't find any proposals either. So we rate this promise Stalled.

Our Sources

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