Wednesday, August 27th, 2014

An ad from Republican U.S. Rep. Tom Cotton attacks Democratic Sen. Mark Pryor in the 2014 race for Senate in Arkansas.

The Arkansas U.S. Senate race: the fact-checks so far

With summer almost over, we kick off a series looking at our fact-checks in some of the key races. Today's installment: Arkansas.

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The Latest from PolitiFact

A scorecard separating fact from fiction

"Every 28 hours" an unarmed black person is shot by a cop.

"I was able to go and buy an automatic weapon … Most people can go out and buy an automatic weapon."

Says Thom Tillis "gives tax breaks to yacht and jet owners."

Police in the United States are allowed to use tear gas even though it "has been classified as a chemical weapon and banned in international conflict since 1993."

"The growth rate of women-owned businesses in Texas has nearly doubled that of the nation since President Obama has taken office."

Ponzi schemer Scott Rothstein "gave hundreds of thousands of campaign cash to control Crist’s appointments of key state judges."

Says of Mitch McConnell, "What can happen in 30 years? A senator can become a multi-millionaire in public office."

The Obama administration originally "wanted 10,000 troops to remain in Iraq -- not combat troops, but military advisers, special operations forces, to watch the counterterrorism effort."

The No. 1 cause of death for African-Americans 15-34 is murder.

Says he "invested over $100 million in worker training."

"Nazi imagery [was used] by the Block for Governor campaign to describe supporters of Allan Fung for Governor."

Says drug cartels are using social media to offer rebates so more children from Central America get smuggled to the United States.

Wisconsin is "38th in the country in terms of proficiency standards" in student testing.

Says Iowa Republican Senate candidate Joni Ernst "would privatize Social Security."

"More whites than blacks are victims of deadly police shootings."

"Washington has incentivized the militarization of local police precincts."

Under Rosemary Lehmberg, the "Travis County D.A.’s office" convened the grand jury that indicted Rick Perry.

Texas prosecutor Rosemary Lehmberg purchased "72 bottles of vodka in just one store alone, in just over a year."

While "Arkansas seniors depend on Social Security and Medicare," Sen. Mark Pryor supports an overhaul so they "couldn’t get Social Security until they turn 68 or 69."

Inside the Meter

Get the PolitiFact app, now optimized for iOs 7

Need the Truth when you’re on the go? Our PolitiFact Mobile app is now optimized for the new iOs 7 on your iPhone or ...
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Aaron Sharockman named PunditFact Editor

PunditFact.com needs an editor as cool as the idea and that’s Aaron Sharockman. Aaron will be the PunditFact editor, charting a course for ...
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New fact-checking study looks at local officials' reactions to fact-checks

More fact-checking -- especially at the state and local level -- could make politicians think twice before they decide to stretch the truth. That’s the interesting ...
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See more Inside the Meter posts

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