Friday, August 29th, 2014
CNN reported that veterans were dying due to delays at VA hospitals. But an inspector general's report released this week found that allegation unsubstantiated.

CNN reported that veterans were dying due to delays at VA hospitals. But an inspector general's report released this week found that allegation unsubstantiated.

The VA story the networks didn't cover this week

Back in May, anyone who tuned in to almost any news show was guaranteed to hear about administrative delays that caused the deaths of 40 veterans at a VA hospital in Phoenix. A significant development in that story happened this week, but you likely missed it.

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The Latest from PunditFact

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Al Sharpton went to Ferguson, Mo., and is "declaring as a matter of fact that ... Michael Brown didn't use any deadly force or posed no deadly threat to the officer."

Says he holds the record for "most appearances on 'Meet the Press'."

"Every 28 hours" an unarmed black person is shot by a cop.

"I was able to go and buy an automatic weapon … Most people can go out and buy an automatic weapon."

Says President Barack Obama released a statement on the "death of brother Robin Williams before ... a statement on brother Michael Brown."

"Over the last 40 years, real wage growth has been flatlined because of the policies of the Federal Reserve ... It was all driven by the Federal Reserve."  

The Obama administration originally "wanted 10,000 troops to remain in Iraq -- not combat troops, but military advisers, special operations forces, to watch the counterterrorism effort."

The No. 1 cause of death for African-Americans 15-34 is murder.

"More whites than blacks are victims of deadly police shootings."

Because of President Barack Obama’s failure to "push job creation," the black unemployment rate in Ferguson, Mo., is three times higher than the white unemployment rate.  

When news broke that Ferguson 18-year-old Michael Brown was a suspect in a robbery, "MSNBC practically went off the air for a while to have behind-closed-doors meetings to figure out how to deal with this new revelation."

Says Keene, N.H., requested a "military-grade armored personnel truck," citing their annual Pumpkin Festival as "a possible target" for terrorists.

A "regulatory thing" means you can’t show someone drinking beer on camera.

Documents released by Edward Snowden reveal that American, British and Israeli intelligence agencies worked together to create the Islamic State.  

"The number of SWAT raids have gone up by 1,400 percent since the 1980s."

In Ferguson, Mo., "you've got three black officers and 50 white officers with a town that is 67 percent African-American."  

"Far more children died last year drowning in their bathtubs than were killed accidentally by guns."

The wife of the Ferguson, Mo., police chief said African-Americans in Ferguson "are feral and violent."  

The Islamic State, or ISIS, was "cast off by al-Qaida because" it was "considered too extreme."  

"Having a baby is a leading cause of poverty spells in the United States."

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