Barack Obama, briefly in Austin, has kept 45 percent of his campaign promises, Obameter indicates

President Barack Obama takes questions from Evan Smith, CEO of the Texas Tribune, to kick off South by Southwest Interactive in Austin March 11, 2016 (Screenshot of White House livestream).
President Barack Obama takes questions from Evan Smith, CEO of the Texas Tribune, to kick off South by Southwest Interactive in Austin March 11, 2016 (Screenshot of White House livestream).

With less than a year remaining in his two terms as president, Barack Obama has fully kept 45 percent of his promises, according to the PolitiFact Obameter.

Obama, who gave a public interview Friday to kick off South by Southwest Interactive in Austin, has achieved compromises on 25 percent of his promises -- and broken 22 percent of those promises, the Obameter suggests.

See the full Obameter here. And here's how all his promises lately break out:

How much a particular promise means is an eye-of-the-beholder question.

For the moment, here are a few of the latest promises rated Broken by PolitiFact:

--On the stump in 2008, Obama promised to eliminate "special tax breaks for oil and gas companies, including repealing special expensing rules, foreign tax credit benefits and manufacturing deductions for oil and gas firms." Obama made calls for doing so through much of his time as president, but there was no progress.

--Obama vowed as a candidate to expand and make refundable child care, such as babysitting or day care expenses. That didn't happen.

--As a candidate, Obama  vowed to "require publicly traded financial partnerships to pay the corporate income tax." This promise was one of several Obama made that would result in increasing taxes on the wealthy. No such law resulted, however.

Obama promises most recently rated Kept on the Obameter:

--On the campaign trail, Obama promised to extend aspects of  tax cuts passed under President George W. Bush, including child credit expansions and changes to marriage bonuses and penalties. In late 2010, President Obama signed legislation extending such for two years. In 2013, he signed legislation delivering the credits for another five years.

--Candidate Obama called for strengthening Small Business Administration programs that "provide capital to minority-owned businesses, support outreach programs that help minority business owners apply for loans, and work to encourage the growth and capacity of minority firms." The federal stimulus package passed into law in 2009 did that.