Duncan Hunter's file:
Hunter

Republican from California

Duncan Hunter is a former U.S. representative from California, first elected to the post in 1980. He was born in California in 1948 and went to Western State University for undergraduate and law degrees. He served in Vietnam and practiced law before running for Congress. He is married and has two children. He withdrew from the presidential race on Jan. 19, 2008.

Recent statements involving Duncan Hunter

"We waterboard, incidentally, hundreds of our own military personnel. They waterboard themselves in training to toughen themselves up."

"And, you know, our first president and our first commander in chief prayed every day. He had a field manual of prayers."

"This (SCHIP) is socialized medicine. It is going to go to families that make $60,000 a year. Those aren't poor children."

Guantanamo detainees "get taxpayer-paid-for prayer rugs…they had honey-glazed chicken and rice pilaf."

"I built that border fence in San Diego...and it reduced the smuggling of people and drugs...by 90 percent."

Recent stories featuring Duncan Hunter

Getting the facts straight about the Founding Fathers:

Pundits and politicians get things wrong time and time again when they use the Founding Fathers to support their political views. In honor of the Fourth of July holiday, we review fact-checks from our archives and set the record straight.

Rudy's Florida pitch: In a TV ad aimed at voters in Florida, Rudy Giuliani makes claims about cutting taxes, welfare reform and a national insurance fund. We find he's mostly right on two, but wrong on the other.

FACT SHEET: Immigration: A breakdown of the immigration issue, including candidate-by-candidate positions.

FACT SHEET: Who was in military?: They want to be commander in chief, but most of the presidential candidates have not served in the military. Our survey of their resumes finds that five of the 15 candidates have military experience.

History is not their best subject:

Presidential candidates often make historical references to emphasize points or justify positions. A lot of the time, though, they get their facts wrong -- to the dismay of historians.

Advertisement
How to contact us:

Email comments and suggestions for fact-checks to truthometer@politifact.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter and Google+. (If you send us a comment, we'll assume you don't mind us publishing it unless you tell us otherwise.)

We're especially interested in any chain emails or social media memes that you would like us to check out.

Browse The Truth-O-MeterTM:
Subscribe: