Monday, September 22nd, 2014

The most recent articles on PolitiFact Georgia

A new look for PolitiFact Georgia

Just in time for easier reads during campaign season, we give you a new design for our fact checks. (Want to see how easy? Check us out on your mobile device!) The Deal-O-Meter: Tracking the 2010 campaign promises of Gov. Nathan Deal Statements that earn the ruling Pants on Fire  

Examining the Israel angle to the Georgia governor's race

Nothing says state politics in Georgia like foreign policy issues, right? That's at least the case in the governor's race this year between incumbent Republican Nathan Deal and Democratic challenger Jason Carter. As the two candidates duel over education and the economy, the question of support for Israel has come up more than once. PolitiFact Georgia looks at one recent case - and explains why the complicated matter has surfaced.  

A closer look at Michelle Nunn

Which political party controls the U.S.. Senate could hinge on Georgia's battle for the seat being left open with Saxby Chambliss' retirement. Voters, and fact checkers, got a long look at GOP nominee David Perdue after the nine-week runoff campaign that ended last month. Democrat Michelle Nunn found herself in the spotlight shortly after that vote, with the accidental leak of a 144-page strategy memo from her campaign. Below are some of the fact checks connected to that memo and Nunn's bid for the seat.    

Local claims in the Truth-O-Meter spotlight

Fact-checks about tax savings and staffing cuts focus on decidedly local claims.

Getting schooled on education in governor's race

With Tuesday's runoff in the rearview mirror, election watchers now turn their attention to November. One of the most highly contested rates will be that of governor, with incumbent Republican Nathan Deal facing Jason Carter, a Democrat from Atlanta. PolitiFact Georgia is keeping close tabs on the close race. Already we have checked some claims in the race, especially on the key battleground issue of education.  

Fact-checking Georgia's U.S. Senate runoff

PolitiFact Georgia has kept a close eye on a statewide race capturing national attention, the GOP runoff for the U.S. Senate nomination. With the election between U.S. Rep. Jack Kingston and businessman David Perdue Tuesday, we've put some of the claims we couldn't resist fact-checking in one spot.

Fact-checks about FIFA and the World Cup

PolitiFact and PunditFact have been seized with World Cup fever, so we've directed our enthusiasm into a few fact-checks.

Tempest over a presidential text?

Says he just sent his first text message 

Fact-checking recent claims about climate change

As new studies shined a spotlight on rising sea levels and global warming, politicians and pundits made several statements we fact-checked.

Candidates take a ride on the Truth-O-Meter as May 20 primaries approach

PolitiFact Georgia is the non-partisan fact-checking operation of The Atlanta Journal Constitution, which attempts to parse political truth from political fiction. Our fact-checkers have been keeping a close eye on Georgia’s candidates for office as the May 20 Primary Election nears.

Top 10 most fact-checked people on the Truth-O-Meter

Curious about who -- other than President Barack Obama -- has been fact-checked on the Truth-O-Meter most often? We were, too. So we created a list.

On eve of the State of the Union address, a look at income inequality

Income inequality is an issue that PolitiFact has analyzed frequently since we started fact-checking political claims in 2007. So as President Barack Obama prepares to focus on income inequality in the State of the Union address, we thought it was a good time to review some of these claims, from both sides.

The 500 fact-checks of President Barack Obama

It was 2007 when a young senator from Illinois arrived on the national scene and launched a campaign for president. By coincidence, that’s the same year PolitiFact launched. We’ve been fact-checking the man who became President Barack Obama ever since. Recently we published our 500th fact-check on Obama.

Claims about MLK often go astray

In the four-plus decades since his death, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. has become, perhaps, the most quoted and misquoted figured in America. With today being King’s birthday, PolitiFact Georgia thought it would be timely to look at some claims concerning the Atlanta native and civil rights legend. Not surprisingly, many of these claims needed some context or were flat-out wrong. Here is a round-up on a few fact-checks involving King. Want to to comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own? Just go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). You can also follow us on Twitter on @politifactga.

Obamacare claims rarely get clean bill of health

If you wanted to ignite an argument in Georgia, and the rest of the nation, in 2013, you just had to say one word: Obamacare. The Affordable Care Act -- its official name -- became a lightning rod of controversy and a springboard for political pontificating. President Barack Obama’s assurance that if you like your health care plan you can keep it was named PolitiFact’s "Lie of the Year" by PolitiFact editors. PolitiFact readers also selected it as their "Lie of the Year" with 59 percent of the vote. It was a landslide. The next highest vote total went to Republican U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas for his contention that Congress is exempt from the health care law. But that only got 8 percent of the vote. Summaries of a few of our favorite Obamacare fact checks from 2013 can be found below. To comment on our rulings or suggest one of your own, go to our Facebook page  (www.facebook.com/politifact.georgia). You can also follow us on Twitter through our Twitter handle @politifactga. Full versions, including full coverage of the Lie of the Year, can be found at  www.politifact.com/georgia/.