Ahead of her Milwaukee appearance, recent Hillary Clinton fact checks

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton takes part in the PBS NewsHour Democratic presidential candidate debate at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee on Feb. 11, 2016. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton takes part in the PBS NewsHour Democratic presidential candidate debate at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee on Feb. 11, 2016. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)
The first White House chief of staff for President Donald Trump (left) was Wisconsinite Reince Priebus, former head of the Wisconsin and national Republican parties. (Getty Images)
The first White House chief of staff for President Donald Trump (left) was Wisconsinite Reince Priebus, former head of the Wisconsin and national Republican parties. (Getty Images)

The scheduled appearance of Hillary Clinton in Milwaukee on Nov. 9, 2017, a year and a day after she lost the presidential election to Donald Trump, leads us to review fact checks we’ve done involving Clinton that have remained in the news in recent months.

Clinton is on a speaking tour to explain "What Happened," her newest political memoir.

Claims by Clinton

"The best estimate is that 200,000 people in Wisconsin were either denied or chilled in their efforts to vote" in the 2016 presidential election.

Our rating: Mostly False.

A report Clinton relied on from a group that supports Democratic candidates said a decline in voter turnout between the 2012 and 2016 presidential elections in Wisconsin was entirely due to the state’s new photo identification requirement for voting.

But experts said that while the photo ID requirement may reduce turnout to some extent, they question the methodology of the report and said there is no way to put a number on how many people in Wisconsin didn’t vote because of the ID requirement.

About "1 percent of all the gun sellers are responsible for more than half of the guns that are used in crimes."

Our rating: Half True.

The best data available at the time essentially backed up the claim, but it was from 1998. It was also worth noting that the gun traces go back to the original seller of a crime gun and don’t take into account whether there were other transactions before a particular gun was used in a crime.

Claims by Priebus

These statements were made by Wisconsinite Reince Priebus, the former Republican National Committee chairman and Trump’s former White House chief of staff.

Clinton took "money from kings of Saudi Arabia and Morocco and Oman and Yemen."

Our rating: Half True.

The monarchies of Saudi Arabia, Morocco and Oman had contributed to the Clinton Foundation; but Yemen, which does not have a king, had not, as of this April 2015 fact check. And although Priebus’ claim was made during a discussion of the foundation as well as contributions to political candidates, his phrasing could have left the impression that Clinton herself, rather than the foundation, received the money.

Clinton's Iran nuclear deal "lined the pockets of the world's number one state sponsor of terrorism with your money."

Our rating: Mostly False.

The United States labels Iran as the top state sponsor of terrorism. But the deal aimed at making it harder for Iran to get a nuclear weapon was struck 2.5 years after Clinton left the Obama administration as secretary of state. And the vast majority of the tens of billions of dollars that Iran gets is not American money, but its own assets, which were frozen by the United States and other countries that imposed sanctions on Iran.

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